Home
Search
עברית
Board & Mission Statement
Why IAM?
About Us
Articles by IAM Associates
On the Brighter Side
Ben-Gurion University
Hebrew University
University of Haifa
Tel Aviv University
Other Institutions
Boycott Calls Against Israel
Israelis in Non-Israeli Universities
Anti-Israel Petitions Supported by Israeli Academics
General Articles
Lawfare
Activists Profiles
Readers Forum
Photographs
Anti-Israel Conferences
How can I complain?
Contact Us / Subscribe
Donate
Number of visitors to IAM
General Articles
Is the Government Diminished Funding for Higher Education Causing the Slide in Ratings?
21.10.13

Editorial Note


As noted in previous postings, the Times rating elicited a large number of responses, mostly by academics accusing the Israeli government of defunding higher education and thus causing the slide in ratings. 
 
As the following article indicates, faculty trying to obtain a bigger piece of the government pie, have misrepresented the complex reality behind the figures. 


Is Scientific Research in Israel Retrogrades?

Yakir Plessner

For several years we have been exposed frequently to statements (brain drain, budget cuts), their purpose is one: to cause anxiety about the future of scientific research in Israel. Many have addressed the subject, including Israel Nobel laureates and, most recently, the Hebrew University President Prof. Menahem Ben-Sasson and chairman of the Planning and Budgeting Committee of the Council for Higher Education, Prof. Manuel Trachtenberg, a professor of economics specializing in economics of research and development (R&D).

Prof. Ben-Sasson was quoted in an article in TheMarker (6.1.13), following the publication by Neaman Institute of a report entitled Israeli R&D Output: International Comparison of Scientific Publications. The research is based on data from an institute named ISI, which indicates that Israel’s international ranking fell in two decades preceding the average of 2004-2008 categories except in the study of molecular biology and genetics, where it has increased. For our purposes, the important point here is that the rating is based on the number of publications in scientific journals. Since research done in the business sector does not normally result in articles in scientific journals, the study pertains to research done in universities and research institutes (such as the Weizmann Institute of Science).

Rating research on the basis of scientific articles is a great starting point, since it clearly doesn’t deal with the question "Why research?" That is, what does research aim to accomplish. There are several possible answers:

(1)  Prestige or international acclaim.

(2) Contribution to the quality of the society.

(3) Contribution to education by increasing the number of higher-education students.

(4) Contribution to the economy, both in the short and the long term.

This essay does not address issues (1) and (2) but there is some doubt whether most tax payers would fund activities directly linked to such goals.  The following will deal with the remaining two objectives.

Higher Education

Start with the contribution to education. Figure 1 reports the number of undergraduate students in the 17 years prior to 2010/11 (not including students at the Open University). It could have been possible to argue that the decline in Israel's standing, in terms of a number of scientific publications, harms the standards of education, had there been a connection between the decline and the number of students attending universities. Figure 1 shows that there is no such connection. The increase in the number of students in the 16 years from 1995/96 is almost linear. The average annual growth of the number of students is 5,400. The years in which growth was significantly lower are 2000/2001 (3,800), 2004 /5 (approximately 3,650) and 2010/11 (3,700). Obviously, there is no clear trend here.


 

 Source: Council for Higher Education .

It seems no less important that the number of postgraduate students is more than doubled between 1994/5 and 2010/11: from 30,500 to 62,562 students. Is this deterioration? There has been a doubling in the number of students in academic institutions for teacher training - from about 10,000 in 1994/5 to 21,000 in 2010/11. And in 2009-10 at the Open University,  more than 43,000 students attended (CBS: Yearbook 2012 , Table 8.58). Of course, all these numbers do not attest to the quality of education that students have been subjected to. This writer believes that we have long ago surpassed the optimum of higher education - higher education has become an obsession.

An international comparison- focusing on the proportion of those holding higher education degree as percentage of the population - seems to bolster this assertion. Figure 2 shows the data for the 35-44 cohort in OECD countries; it should be pointed out that no country with a higher rate than Israel is omitted.  As can be seen, the rate of highly educated in Israel in the said age group exceeds the OECD average by 15.6 percentage points. And classic "backward" countries such as Denmark, Sweden and Switzerland trail far behind Israel. We shall return to this point later. Meanwhile, what about other age groups? Israel's 25-34 age group ranks slightly lower, but still exceeds the OECD average by 6.6 percentage points. One would think that this is a result of the long compulsory military service in Israel, which postpones higher education, so only a few in the 25-26 age group will have attained a bachelor's degree. In contrast, the 45-54 age group in Israel is in first place among the OECD countries in terms of the proportion of highly educated people.


Source: OECD.

Brain drain

A constant whining on the part of higher education functionaries and others concerning the "brain drain" allegedly caused by the neglect of R&D by the state. The following data are enlightening in this regard: In 2008-9 the number of lecturers (the initial rank in regular tenure track positions) in Israel’s universities was 459 (CBS: Yearbook 2012, Table 8.46). During that year 1,373 were awarded PhD degrees in Israel, the degree needed to get an academic position at the universities (CBS: Higher Education in Israel 2008-9, Table 3.1). This means that in one year the number of new potential lecturers has almost tripled (!) the number of those serving in this position.   It should be absolutely clear that this represents a glut of supply that the existing system cannot absorb and, more importantly, even a much larger system would not have been able to absorb.  Therefore, it is only natural that some PhD holders will seek alternatives in countries where there is no such excess supply.

This phenomenon is similar to other products or services; when a country produces surplus, it exports it. The difference is that in our case there is no one "selling" the excess minds abroad and therefore it is not a typical case of foreign trade.  On the contrary, the Israeli government which funds much of the students’ tuition fee at universities, provides a subsidy to other countries which enjoy the fruits.

Education, research and development, and economics

Is the neglect of research allocations, which Israeli governments are accused of in recent years, a threat to economic growth and to the status of Israel as a high-tech nation? Ultimately, this is of course the most important question, and the answer is an emphatic no: There is no correlation between R&D within universities and R&D in Israel as a whole. Figure 3 removes all doubts about it.




 Source: Central Bureau of Statistics , Yearbook 2012, Table 28.25 

As can be seen, Israel tops OECD countries in expenditure on R&D in terms of GDP (List of countries in the figure is partial, but no other country in the OECD spends more than Israel). The weight of civil R&D in Israel's GDP is more than twice the OECD average.   An additional note in this context is in order;  (a) Israel has a substantial defense R&D spending, which is a tightly guarded secret.  It contributes significantly to the economy both in terms of enhanced security and in terms of large-scale exports.  (b) Many of the countries represented in the figure have no defense R&D. These comprise all the Euro Zone countries except of France and Spain, as well as Australia and Denmark. (c) Even the per-capita expenditure on civilian R&D in Israel is among the highest in the OECD. Only Denmark, Sweden, Finland and Switzerland exceed Israel in this respect. How, then, does Israel excel in high expenditure on R&D if the government neglects the field?

The answer lies in Table 1. The table reports the distribution of civilian R&D expenditure by source of funding and execution. To understand the table, we will focus on the business sector. It financed 18.4 % of total civilian R&D. 

TABLE 1. Financing and Operating Civilian R & D, 2009 , percent

Sector financing R&D

Sector carrying out R&D

Total

Business

Government

Academia

NGO’s

Business

18.4

  9.7

  5.4

52.2

43.6

Government

36.9

47.8

93.3

  4.3

14.5

Academia

  0.1

13.4

  0.2

-

  1.8

NGO’s

11.7

  8.7

  0.2

-

  1.6

Foreign sources

33.0

20.4

  0.9

43.5

38.5

Source: Central Bureau of Statistics , Yearbook 2012 , Table 26.2 .

 

Out of the total R&D funding in academia, it financed 52.2%, with almost all the rest of the academic research financed by foreign research foundations. The government financed 36.9 % of total R&D, but only 4.3% (marked in red) of academic R&D. And this is precisely the source of the lament about  Israel’s deterioration: university researchers, who have interests just like other individuals, want the government to fund more academic research.

But  the government seems to think that it's more important to fund R&D that may yield economic returns, which is why it funded 36.9% of all business R&D. It is highly interesting that foreign countries seem to think that business R&D in Israel has a potential to high return on investment; otherwise, foreign companies would not have financed a third of Israel’s business R&D.

Recalling that we are now deliberating the economic benefits of R&D, does the government’s unwillingness to finance more academic R&D engender economic losses? Terence Kealey deals with this question in his fascinating book The Economic Laws of Scientific Research.  He concludes - based on a wealth of data over two hundred years of history - that the answer to the question whether academic-scientific research funded by the government brings about faster economic growth - is negative. Furthermore, he states that the relationship actually reflects a reverse causal model: richer countries can allocate more resources for academic research. In other words, more growth leads to more investment in academic research, rather than the other way around. Kealy's most surprising finding is that the practical concerns usually precedes science. Thus, the steam engine was invented by a technician; only then were the physical laws describing its workings formulated.  The book also lists numerous inventions that transformed the economy and were not based on scientific research in academia.  His list include the internal combustion engine, the electric light bulb and other examples.

Which brings us back to the ranking by the proportion of highly educated people in the population.  We have seen that countries like Switzerland and Denmark lag after Israel in this regard, but lo and behold, these are very strong economies, wealthier than Israel in terms of GDP per capita.

But it is the German economy that provides the most striking contrast to Israel (Germany is marked in green in Figure 2).  As can be seen, in Germany the proportion of individuals with higher education aged 35-44 is lower than the OECD average. Yet Germany is the economic power of Europe, and in some ways of the world.  This is not to say that Israel can emulate Germany; its economic structure is unique and driven by the obsessive precision that Germans display.  One important aspect of their success is their substantial investment in high quality vocational training for high school students who do not show aptitude for higher academic learning.  In Israel, in the absence of good vocational training many students end up in colleges.  University leaders would have done an important service to the national economy had they drawn attention to the lack of proper vocational training.   As it stands, Israel has more than enough of higher education as compared to vocational one. 


*Professor Yakir Plessner is a Senior Lecturer in Economics at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem and a Fellow and member of the Steering Committee of the Jerusalem Center for Public Affairs. He was formerly Deputy Governor of the Bank of Israel and economic advisor to the Minister of Finance. He is the author of The Political Economy of Israel: From Ideology to Stagnation. He currently serves as an acting chairman of Israel Academia Monitor.

 

האם המחקר המדעי בישראל מדרדר?

יקיר פלסנר

            מזה כמה שנים אנו נחשפים לעיתים מזומנות לאמירות מסוגים שונים (בריחת מוחות, קיצוצי תקציב) שעניינן אחד: לגרום לחרדה בדבר עתידו של המחקר המדעי בישראל. התבטאו בהקשר הזה רבים, בהם חתני פרס נובל ישראלים. לאחרונה שמענו על כך מפיהם של נשיא האוניברסיטה העברית, פרופ' מנחם בן-ששון, ושל יו"ר הוועדה לתכנון ותקצוב של המועצה להשכלה גבוהה, פרופ' מנואל טרכטנברג. האחרון, יש לדעת, הוא פרופסור לכלכלה שהתמחה בכלכלת המחקר והפיתוח.

            פרופ' בן-ששון מצוטט במאמר בדה-מרקר (6.1.13), שנכתב בעקבות פרסומו ע"י מוסד נאמן של תפוקות מחקר ופיתוח בישראל: פרסומים מדעיים בהשוואה בינלאומית (מחברים ד"ר דפנה גץיאיר אבן-זוהרבלה זלמנוביץד"ר ערן לקפרופ' גדעון שפסקי). החיבור מבוסס על נתוניו של מכון בשם ISI, ומהם עולה כי ישראל ירדה בדירוג הבינ"ל בשני העשורים שעד ממוצע 2004-2008 בכל קטגוריות המחקר למעט ביולוגיה מולקולרית וגנטיקה, שם עלתה. הנקודה החשובה כאן לענייננו היא שהדירוג הזה מבוסס על מספר הפרסומים בכתבי עת מדעיים. כלומר, מדובר במחקר המתבצע במוסדות אקדמיים ומכוני מחקר (כגון מכון וייצמן למדע), שהרי מחקרים בסקטור העסקי אינם זוכים בד"כ לפרסום בכתבי עת מדעיים.

            מדידת איכות המחקר באמצעות מאמרים מדעיים היא נקודה מצוינת להתחיל בה. שכן מה שאין בדירוג הזה הוא תשובה לשאלה "למה מחקר?". כלומר, מה מחקר אמור להשיג. יש לכך כמה תשובות אפשריות:

1.פרסטיז'ה, או יוקרה בינלאומית.

2. תרומה לאיכות החברה.

3. תרומה לחינוך באמצעות הגדלת שיעורי הלומדים במוסדות להשכלה גבוהה.

4. תרומה לכלכלה, בין בטווח הקצר ובין בטווח הארוך.

ביחס לתשובות (1) ו-(2) אין לי הרבה מה לומר, למעט הטלת ספק בכך שרוב הציבור היה מוכן לשלם מיסים כדי לממן פעילות המביאה לתוצאות המתוארות בשתי התשובות הללו. מכיוון שכך, נותר לעסוק בשתי התשובות האחרונות.

 

החינוך הגבוה

            נפתח בתרומה לחינוך. ציור 1 מדווח את מספר הסטודנטים לתואר ראשון ב-17 השנים שעד 2010/11 (לא כולל לומדים באוניברסיטה הפתוחה). היה ניתן לטעון שהירידה במיקומה של ישראל מבחינת מספר הפרסומים המדעיים פוגע בחינוך אילו היה קשר בין ירידת מיקומה של ישראל למספר הסטודנטים הלומדים באוניברסיטאות. ציור 1 מלמד שאי-אפשר להבחין בקשר שכזה. הגידול במספר הסטודנטים ב-16 השנים שמ-1995/96 הוא כמעט ליניארי. הגידול השנתי הממוצע עומד על כ-5,400 סטודנטים. שנים שבהן היה הגידול נמוך במידה משמעותית מכך הן 2000/2001 (3,800), 2004/5 (כ-3,650) ו-2010/11 (כ-3,700). נהיר שאין כאן תהליך ברור.


           

 1

המקור: המועצה להשכלה גבוהה.

           

 

מה שאולי לא פחות חשוב הוא שמספר הסטודנטים לתארים מתקדמים יותר מהוכפל בין 1994/5 ו-2010/11: מ-30,500 ל-62,562. האם לזה יקרא הידרדרות אקדמית? הכפלה חלה גם במספר הלומדים במוסדות אקדמיים להכשרת מורים – מכ-10,000 ב-1994/5 לכ-21,000 ב-2010/11. ובשנת הלימודים תש"ע למדו באוניברסיטה הפתוחה יותר מ-43,000 סטודנטים (למ"ס: שנתון 2012, לוח 8.58). כמובן שכל המספרים הללו אין בהם כדי להעיד על איכות התארים בהם זוכים התלמידים. כותב שורות אלה סבור שכבר מזמן עברנו את האופטימום בתחום ההשכלה הגבוהה – לימודים במוסדות ההשכלה הגבוהה הפכו לאובססיה.

                השוואה בינלאומית מעניינת בהקשר הנוכחי היא השוואת שיעור בעלי ההשכלה הגבוהה בקרב האוכלוסיה. הנתונים לגבי שכבת הגילים 35-44 בחלק ממדינות ה-OECD, מצויים בציור 2. וצריך להוסיף מייד שלא הושמטו מדינות שבהן השיעור גבוה מאשר בישראל. כפי שניתן לראות, שיעור בעלי ההשכלה הגבוהה בישראל בקבוצת הגילים האמורה גבוה ב-15.6 נקודות אחוז ממוצע מדינות ה-OECD. ומדינות "מפגרות" קלסיות כגון דנמרק, שוודיה ושוויצריה נשרכות הרבה מאחורי ישראל. עוד נשוב לנקודה זו בהמשך, אבל בינתיים – מה ביחס לקבוצות הגיל האחרות? ובכן, בקבוצת הגילים 25-34 ישראל מדורגת מעט נמוך יותר, אבל עדיין ב-6.6 נקודות אחוז מעל ממוצע ה-OECD. יש סיבה טובה לחשוב שהדבר נובע מכך שהשירות הצבאי הממושך בישראל דוחה את הלימודים הגבוהים, כך שבקבוצת הגילים 25-26 יש בישראל מעטים שיש להם כבר תואר ראשון. ובקבוצת הגילים 45-54, ישראל עומדת במקום הראשון בין מדינות ה-OECD,  עם שעור השכלה גבוהה כמעט כפול ממוצע מדינות ה-OECD.

 


2

    המקור: OECD.

 

בריחת המוחות

אחת מהבכיות הגדולות של עסקני ההשכלה הגבוהה היא על "בריחת המוחות", הנגרמת כביכול ע"י הזנחת המחקר והפיתוח ע"י המדינה. הנתון הבא מאיר עיניים בהקשר הזה: בשנת תשס"ט היה מספר המורים בדרגת מרצה (הדרגה ההתחלתית במסלול האקדמי הרגיל) באוניברסיטאות בישראל 459 (למ"ס: שנתון 2012, לוח 8.46). באותה השנה הוענקו בישראל 1,373 תארי דוקטור, הוא התואר הדרוש כדי לקבל משרה אקדמית באוניברסיטה (למ"ס: השכלה גבוהה בישראל תשס"ט, לוח 3.1). כלומר, התוספת בשנה אחת למי שיש להם תואר המכשיר אותם עקרונית להתחיל לשרת במשרת מרצה באוניברסיטה עמדה על כמעט פי שלושה(!) מהמכהנים במשרה כזו. ברור לחלוטין שזהו שיטפון של היצע שאין שום דרך לקלוט אותו במערכת הקיימת, ומה שחשוב יותר – גם במערכת גדולה הרבה יותר. טבעי, לפיכך, שחלק מן האנשים הזוכים בתואר דוקטור יחפשו חלופות במדינות שאין בהן עודף היצע כזה.

אין זה שונה ממה שחל על כל מוצר או שירות אחר: כשמדינה מייצרת עודף, היא מייצאת אותו. ההבדל הוא שבמקרה שלנו אין מי שמוכר את המוחות העודפים לחו"ל, ולכן אין כאן מקרה קלסי של סחר חוץ. נהפוך הוא: ממשלת ישראל, המממנת חלק ניכר משכר הלימוד של הסטודנטים באוניברסיטאות, מעניקה סובסידיה למדינות אחרות הנהנות מפירות ההוצאה בישראל.

 

 

השכלה, מחקר ופיתוח, וכלכלה.

            האם הזנחת ההקצאות למחקר שבה מואשמות ממשלות ישראל בשנים האחרונות מסכנת את הצמיחה הכלכלית ואת מעמדה של ישראל כאומת טכנולוגיה עלית? בסופו של יום, זו כמובן השאלה החשובה ביותר. והתשובה היא שלילית בתכלית: אין זהות בין מחקר ופיתוח בין כותלי האוניברסיטאות למחקר ופיתוח בישראל בכללותה. ציור 3 מסיר כל ספק בעניין זה. 



3

    המקור: למ"ס, שנתון 2012, לוח 28.25.

 

כפי שניתן לראות ישראל עומדת בראש מדינות ה-OECD  בהוצאה למו"פ אזרחי במונחי תוצר (רשימת המדינות בציור היא חלקית, אבל אין ב-OECD  מדינה המוציאה יותר מישראל). משקל המו"פ האזרחי בתוצר של ישראל הוא יותר מכפול מהממוצע ב-OECD. לכך יש להוסיף כדלקמן: (א) בישראל יש מו"פ בטחוני ניכר – ההוצאה עליו היא אחד הסודות היותר שמורים. ולמו"פ הבטחוני תרומה ניכרת לכלכלה הן במונחי בטחון ישראל והן במונחי יצוא בקנה מידה גדול. (ב) לרבות מן המדינות המיוצגות בציור אין כלל מו"פ בטחוני. באלה כלולות כל מדינות גוש היורו למעט צרפת וספרד, וכן אוסטרליה ודנמרק.

(ג) גם ההוצאה על מו"פ אזרחי לנפש בישראל היא מהגבוהות ב-OECD. הוצאה גבוהה יותר לנפש יש רק בדנמרק, שוודיה, פינלנד ושוויצריה. איך מצטיינת ישראל בהוצאה גבוהה כל כך למו"פ אזרחי, אם הממשלה מזניחה את התחום?

            התשובה נעוצה בלוח 1. הלוח מדווח את חלוקת ההוצאה למו"פ אזרחי לפי מקור המימון ומבצע המו"פ. כדי להבין את הלוח, נתמקד בסקטור העסקי. זה מימן 18.4% מסך המימון של מו"פ אזרחי.

 

לוח 1. מימון וביצוע מו"פ אזרחי, 2009, אחוזים

הסקטור המממן

הסקטור מבצע המחקר

ס"ה

עסקי

ממשלתי

אקדמי

מלכ"ר פרטים

עסקי

18.4 

9.7

5.4

52.2 

43.6 

ממשלתי

36.9 

47.8 

93.3 

4.3

14.5 

אקדמי

0.1

13.4 

0.2

-

1.8

מלכ"ר פרטיים

11.7

8.7

0.2

-

1.6

חו"ל

33.0

20.4 

0.9

43.5 

38.5 

המקור: למ"ס, שנתון 2012, לוח 26.2.

               

מסך המימון של מו"פ כזה באקדמיה, היווה המימון ע"י הסקטור העסקי 52.2%, כאשר כמעט כל יתר המחקר האקדמי מומן בידי קרנות מחקר בחו"ל. הממשלה שמימנה 36.9% מסך המו"פ, מימנה רק 4.3% (מסומן באדום) מהמו"פ באוניברסיטאות. וזהו בדיוק מקור הקינה על הידרדרות ישראל: החוקרים באוניברסיטאות, שיש להם אינטרסים בדיוק כמו ליתר בני התמותה, רוצים שהממשלה תממן יותר מחקר באקדמיה.

            אלא שהממשלה חושבת כנראה שיותר חשוב לממן מו"פ שיש יותר וודאות שיניב פירות כלכליים, ולכן היא מימנה 36.9% מכל המו"פ שהתבצע בסקטור העסקי. גם בחו"ל חושבים שלמו"פ העסקי בישראל יש פוטנציאל: אחרת לא היו חברות בחו"ל מממנות שליש מההוצאה למו"פ בסקטור העסקי.

            בהיזכרנו שאנו עוסקים כעת בתועלת הכלכלית של מו"פ, האם אי-התגייסות הממשלה למימון מחקר באוניברסיטאות, יש בה משום נזק כלכלי? על השאלה הזו ענה במונחים עקרוניים Terence Kealey בספרו המרתק The Economic Laws of Scientific Research (החוקים הכלכליים של מחקר מדעי). המחבר קובע, על סמך עושר רב של נתונים לאורך כמאתיים שנות היסטוריה, שהתשובה היא שלילית. הבחינה העקרונית שלו היא של השאלה, האם מחקר מדעי אקדמי הממומן ע"י ממשלות מביא לצמיחה כלכלית מהירה יותר. תשובתו היא שלילית. יתרה מזו, הוא קובע שהקשר הוא הפוך: מדינות עשירות יותר מרשות לעצמן להקצות יותר משאבים למחקר אקדמי. לשון אחרת, כיוון הסיבתיות הוא הפוך: יותר צמיחה מביאה ליותר השקעה במחקר אקדמי. ואולם המסקנה המפתיעה ביותר שלו היא שבדרך כלל הפרקטיקה קדמה למדע. מנוע הקיטור הומצא ע"י טכנאי, ורק אח"כ נוסחו הכללים הפיסיקליים שעל-פיהם פועל המנוע. הספר גם מונה שורה ארוכה של המצאות ששינו את פני הכלכלה ולא היו מבוססות על מחקר מדעי באקדמיה. כאלה הן למשל מנוע הבערה הפנימית, נורת החשמל ועוד ועוד.

            מה שמחזיר אותנו לדירוג לפי מספר בעלי ההשכלה הגבוהה באוכלוסיה. ראינו לעיל שמדינות כמו שוויצריה ודנמרק מפגרות הרבה אחרי ישראל בעניין זה. אבל הפלא ופלא, מדובר בכלכלות חזקות מאד, עשירות מישראל במונחי תוצר לנפש.

            אבל הניגוד הבולט ביותר למצב בישראל טמון בכלכלה הגרמנית – גרמניה מסומנת בירוק בציור 2. כפי שאפשר לראות, בגרמניה שיעור בעלי ההשכלה הגבוהה בגילאי 35-44 נמוך מממוצע ה-OECD. ובכל זאת גרמניה היא המעצמה הכלכלית של אירופה, ובמובנים מסויימים של העולם.  אינני מתכוון לומר שאנחנו יכולים לחקות את גרמניה – מבנה הכלכלה שלה מיוחד במינו, ונתמך ע"י ה"יקיות" של הגרמנים – הדייקנות הכפייתית שלהם. אחד ההיבטים החשובים של הצלחתם הוא ההשקעה הרבה שלהם בהכשרה מקצועית בדרגה גבוהה של אנשים שיתרונם אינו דווקא ברכישת השכלה גבוהה. אין לי ספק שברבות מן המכללות בארץ יש לא מעט אנשים כאלה. אלא שאין להם חלופה – אין בארץ הכשרה מקצועית ראויה לשמה. אם על-כך היו מתריעים ראשי האוניברסיטאות, הם היו עושים שירות חשוב באמת לכלכלת המדינה. השכלה גבוהה יש לנו די והותר.



Back to "General Articles"Send Response
Top Page
    Developed by Sitebank & Powered by Blueweb Internet Services
    Visitors: 106127908Send to FriendAdd To FavoritesMake It HomepagePrint version
    blueweb