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Tel Aviv University
TAU Anat Matar to speak at "Israeli Apartheid Week" in Helsinki, March 11, 2016

10.3.16

Editorial Note

Dr. Anat Matar is a member of faculty at Tel Aviv University philosophy department. IAM has written extensively on her extensive political activism, which apparently prevented her from publishing enough to be promoted above the position of senior lecturer.
Matar is one of the first Israelis to endorse BDS against Israel and a long proponent of army refusal. She was quoted in a 2011 book as stating, “but the army gets away with murder in this country. And when a kid puts his head on the guillotine, sometimes people wake up and smell their own shit." 

In spite of a law against BDS she has been engaged in recent BDS activities. In a conference on BDS that took place in Nazareth in February, Matar spoke about the role of the academia. "She said that Israeli academia was integral to the oppression of Palestinians, with strong ties between the universities and Israel’s various security industries... she said sympathetic academics should refuse to organise international conferences in Israel."   Omar Barghouti the founder of the BDS movement, has "highlighted the successes of the BDS campaign since it was launched by Palestinian civil society in 2005, and the importance of keeping the movement open to all, including Israeli Jews."

Matar is quite proud of her role as an anti-Israel activist, as can be seen by a note she wrote for a journalist: "As a Jewish Israeli opposed to the state’s policies of occupation and discrimination, I know what it’s like to be smeared with claims I am a ‘traitor’ or ’self-hating Jew’."

As part of the Israeli Apartheid Week, Matar is scheduled to appear on the 11th of March 2016 in an event in Helsinki, Finland, "The world behind bars: the occupation of the laws and political prisoners," where she will be speaking in an "expert discussion". The organizers explained that the debate "Included an Israeli philosopher and activist Anat Matar."  The organizers also stated that "Turkey and Israel/Palestinian political turmoil are in the headlines, and the Western Sahara occupation continues in silence. The dead receive attention in the media, but rarely remembered the political prisoners who are languishing in jails for years. Israel, Morocco and Turkey, all of the EU's allies, using the judiciary to political power, as a tool."  

In a 2012 article in Kivunim Hadashim, Professor Ziva Shamir, the former head of the School of History at TAU, revealed that some faculty have turned their university offices into extensions of their political party bureaus. "An advice to those faculty, a small but vocal minority that call for a boycott of Israeli academia - please move abroad, so you would not have to teach in the institutions of higher education which you so despise. The law allows firing workers who advocates boycotting their own factory, on the grounds that he or she causes damage to the factory. Academics who call for boycott cause tremendous damage not just in financial terms but also in terms of legitimacy." 

Evidently, Matar has not taken this advise to heart. While being a TAU employee she is still travelling and speaking for BDS when it is illegal.


Emerging from a ‘reign of terror’: Palestinians in Israel hold first BDS conference
 on March 2, 2016
Israel’s large Palestinian minority held its first-ever conference on BDS – boycott, divestment and sanctions – this past weekend in spite of anti-boycott legislation introduced five years ago that exposes activists in Israel to harsh financial penalties.
One participant called it a sign that the Palestinian minority was slowly emerging from the law’s “reign of terror”.
The dangers of promoting BDS inside Israel were highlighted by the difficulties of finding a venue. A private cinema in Nazareth agreed to host the event after several public venues in Haifa backed out, apparently fearful that they risked being punished by the Israeli government.
The question of how feasible it is for Israel’s 1.6 million Palestinian citizens to promote BDS was high on the conference agenda, with speakers addressing issues of legality and strategy.
In a sign of a tentative shift towards political support for BDS by the Palestinian leadership in Israel, the opening statement was made by Mohammed Barakeh, head of the High Follow-Up Committee, an umbrella body representing all the political factions.
Barakeh said BDS was “an important form of solidarity with Palestinians” and was causing increasing panic among the Israeli leadership.
He said there was a link between “support for BDS and our survival in the current conditions” of rising Israeli racism, the killing of Palestinians by security forces, the expansion of the settlements and entrenchment of the occupation.
He noted arguments, echoing those of apartheid’s supporters in South Africa, that BDS would chiefly hurt Palestinian workers. “The anti-apartheid struggle in South Africa had a simple retort: ‘Apartheid hurts us more’.”
Barakeh admitted BDS posed unique problems for Palestinians in Israel. “We cannot boycott everything. We need schools, passports, social security. We have the right to be citizens and live in our homeland.”

Legal threats

The conference – titled “BDS and ‘48 Palestinians: Between International Influences and Local Contexts” – had been a long time in the making.
In 2009 Israel’s Palestinian political factions set up a working group called the Boycott Committee ’48 – in reference to the Palestinians who managed to remain on their lands in 1948 and eventually became Israel citizens – to examine the issue of support for BDS.
Although it formulated general guidelines in 2012, they were effectively buried by the so-called Anti-Boycott Law, which the Israeli parliament passed the year before.
The law exposed anyone inside Israel calling for a boycott, even of the settlements, to potential bankruptcy in Israel’s civil courts. Companies, Israeli citizens and settlers were entitled to claim unlimited damages.
The conference had been made possible now, organisers conceded, because last year the supreme court, while rejecting an appeal against the law, placed limits on how vigorously it could be applied.
The event was sponsored by three groups: the Boycott Committee ’48; Mitharkeen, a direct-action movement comprising Palestinians from Israel, the West Bank and Gaza; and Hirak Haifa, a youth group based in the northern Israeli city of Haifa.
Sawsan Zaher, a lawyer from Adalah, a legal center for Palestinians in Israel, detailed the implications for Israeli citizens of promoting BDS and how to avoid law suits.
The 2011 law, she pointed out, prevented anyone advocating BDS from getting government contracts or state budgets.
Few Palestinian citizens were eligible for the former. But bodies such as cultural associations, political parties, schools and libraries that received state funds could be targeted, making it difficult for Palestinian institutions in Israel to show solidarity.

Zionist propaganda

Last year’s supreme court ruling, however, had softened the impact on activism by civil society, creating some leeway.
The judges said a claimant for damages would need to prove that a call for BDS had resulted in quantifiable damage and there was a direct connection between the activism and the damage suffered.
Expressing general support for BDS or calling for a boycott of the settlements would not be covered by the law, she concluded, but targeting specific firms would be.
Raja Zaatry, representing the Boycott Committee 48, said a BDS struggle in Israel had to be carefully tailored to local realities.
The aim of the 2011 law had been to “terrorise Israeli society” and the biggest challenge facing the BDS campaign was to gain a place in the mainstream among Palestinians in Israel.
The first priority, he suggested, should be to stop the Palestinian minority from being implicated in Zionist propaganda against BDS.
He and other conference participants attacked Palestinians in Israel who helped to launder Israel’s image abroad. The singer Mira Awad was singled out for her appearances representing Israel in counties such as Spain and India.
In another illustration, Zaatry noted that Ariel University, located deep in the West Bank in a settlement of the same name, exploited the fact that 300 Palestinian citizens studied there to suggest it promoted coexistence.
He argued that the Palestinian minority should start by launching campaigns against Ariel University and settlement products.
Palestinians in Israel could also help bolster the international BDS movement by exposing not just the brutalities of the occupation but also the systematic racism and discrimination they faced inside Israel.
He also highlighted complexities, “We need to be careful. Many Israeli Jews already boycott Palestinian communities in Israel like Nazareth. We do not want to fuel that kind of racism with our own forms of boycott against their towns.”

Knesset boycott

The BDS campaign faced its toughest challenges in the political arena in Israel.
The committee had avoided divisive proposals, Zaatry said, especially the most contentious issue facing the Palestinian minority: whether to boycott the Israeli parliament.
The Joint List, which combines four political factions, is currently the third largest party in the Knesset. Two other parties, the secular Abnaa al-Balad and the recently outlawed northern Islamic Movement, both reject participation in national elections.
The committee’s position was backed by Omar Barghouti, one of the founders of the BDS movement. In a later panel he said a decision to boycott the Knesset should wait until a wider consensus had formed on the issue.
Although the Joint List had not adopted the BDS guidelines, Zaatry noted that one of its factions, the Communist party, had passed a resolution last year supporting a boycott of the settlements. Members of another faction, Balad, had expressed support for the same policy.
But in a sign of the pressures on the political parties, Zaatry noted that two years ago Avigdor Lieberman, then foreign minister, had lobbied Haifa University to strip Yousef Jabareen, then a lecturer and now a Knesset member, of his position for participating in a BDS debate.
An important goal, said Zaatry, was to forge a common struggle with sympathetic Israeli Jews to counter Israeli propaganda that support for BDS was anti-Semitic.

Role of academia

Reinforcing that point was Anat Matar, a philosopher from Tel Aviv University.
She said Israeli academia was integral to the oppression of Palestinians, with strong ties between the universities and Israel’s various security industries. Israeli universities also worked hard to forge strong bonds with overseas academics.
Echoing Zaatry’s call for the BDS campaign in Israel to be pragmatic, she said sympathetic academics should refuse to organise international conferences in Israel.
However, she said she preferred to participate in conferences overseas. “I am freer to say what I really think of BDS when I am abroad.”
Omar Barghouti highlighted the successes of the BDS campaign since it was launched by Palestinian civil society in 2005, and the importance of keeping the movement open to all, including Israeli Jews.
Barghouti said the 2011 law meant Israel’s Palestinian minority could not target specific companies, but he suggested that activists collect and publicise data about those that profit from the occupation. He urged activists to be as creative as possible.
Other activists tried to offer practical suggestions for ways Israel’s Palestinian citizens could assist the BDS movement.
Haneen Maikey, of Al-Qaws, an organisation that campaigns for sexual and gender diversity in Palestinian society, argued that the LGBT community should work hard to counter “pinkwashing” – Israel’s efforts to brand itself as gay-friendly.
Such moves were designed “to distract attention from Israel’s human rights abuses against Palestinians”.
She said LGBT movements in Israel should try to persuade overseas gay activists not to come to Israel for events like the annual Gay Pride March in Tel Aviv.
They should also have a strong presence at LGBT conferences abroad to try to challenge the narratives Israel was actively promoting.

Profiting from occupation

Hadeel Badarneh, of Who Profits?, which exposes companies that profit from the occupation, said it was important to think beyond the security industries and settlements to what she called Israel’s “infrastructure of economic control”.
Israel’s Chinese-owned dairy producer Tnuva benefited from the fact that the West Bank population was dependent on its products, creating a monopoly worth $60 million in the West Bank alone.
Similarly, the Nesher company controlled 85 per cent of all construction in the area, including providing most of the cement used to rebuild Gaza after Israel’s repeated destructive attacks on the enclave.
She noted the growing trend towards “ethical investments”, and the behind-the-scenes role activists could play in pressuring companies to pull out of Israel.
Cultural questions also featured strongly.
Suha Arraf, who outraged Israeli officials in 2014 by identifying her Israeli-funded filmVilla Touma as Palestinian, spoke of the difficulties for local Palestinian artists in finding ways to finance their work.
She said Arab states refused to finance projects, viewing it as normalisation, while the Palestinian Authority lacked funds to help. Foreign funds, meanwhile, would usually only agree to top up local funding.
She said the BDS movement needed to devise alternative funding sources if it was going to insist on artists rejecting Israeli assistance.

Cultural ties

Also addressing cultural issues was Ali Muasi, a teacher who recently made headlines too.
Muasi was fired on Saturday by his school in the central Israeli town of Baqa al-Gharbiyya for showing to his pupils a Palestinian film, Omar, about Israel’s aggressive efforts to recruit collaborators as a way to weaken Palestinian society.
Even though he appears to have broken no rules, the education ministry has so far shown no interest in supporting him against his dismissal.
Muasi spoke on the conflicting requirements of boycott and the need among Palestinians in both Israel and the occupied territories to maintain political and cultural connections to the wider Arab world.
He rejected the current position of the BDS campaign that Arab artists could visit the occupied territories but not Palestinians in Israel.
He opposed visits to both. “We have to subject such visits to a test – do they aid us in our political project of national liberation?”
He argued that most visits offered little more than entertainment, while serving chiefly to confer legitimacy on Israel. With the internet, he added, it was easy for Palestinians to maintain cultural ties to the region without visits.
“We have to ask ourselves how much do these visits help to change our situation. It is the same question we need to ask about our participation in the Knesset.”
To members of the audience who disagreed, Muasi pointed out that, if Arab artists spoke out clearly against the occupation, they would be treated like the US intellectual Noam Chomsky, who was refused entry by Israel in 2010.
However, Muasi made an exception for visits by exiled Palestinians. He said they should come – even if they needed permission from the Israeli military – because it was a priority that they strengthen their ties to the Palestinian homeland.


=====================================================

The world behind bars
02/24/2016

Israeli apartheidweek
RELEASE
The world behind bars: the occupation of the laws and political prisoners
Movie and expert discussion in Helsinki as part of the Israeli Apartheid Week
Turkey and Israel / Palestinian political turmoil in the headlines, and the Western Sahara occupation continues in silence. The dead will receive attention in the media, but rarely remembered as political prisoners who are languishing in jails for years. Israel, Morocco and Turkey, all of the EU's allies, using the judiciary to political power, the use of a tool.
This is discussed in ceremony "One World Behind Bars," on Friday, 11.3. 17.30 Andorra theater at Eerikinkatu 11.
At 17.30, will be displayed in Andorra Israeli documentary The Law in These Parts. The film deals with the Israeli-occupied Palestinian territories erection of military regulations system, through interviews, the judges have developed. The film was the first time they agreed to be interviewed. The Law in These Parts is an award-winning mm. Sundance Film Festival and the Jerusalem Film Festival.
The time is 19.30 in Andorra debate on political prisoners in Israel / Palestine, the occupied Western Sahara and Turkey. Included are an Israeli philosopher and activist Anat Matar, sahrawiaktivisti Mohamed Samid Western Sahara, as well as a journalist and activist Bruno Jäntti. Chairman of the Israeli Committee Against House Demolitions Finland Autumn Räsänen speech leads to opportunity.
The event, the film including, free of charge and requires no registration required. The film is the English texts and discussion will be in English.
The event is organized by Israeli Committee Against House Demolitions Finland and the Finnish Peace Committee. The event is part of a worldwide event, Israeli Apartheid Week, which aims to raise awareness of the Israeli apartheid system. Israeli Apartheid Week was founded in Toronto in 2005, and today has annual events in over a hundred cities around the world.
The film The Law in These Parts Trailer: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rzEy-FPw-iQ

The film The Law in These Parts Web page: https://www.thelawfilm.com/eng
Israeli Apartheid Week Web page: http://apartheidweek.org/
For more information: Autumn Räsänen, syksy.rasanen@iki.fi
For more information on the speakers
Anat Matar
Anat Matar is a senior lecturer in the Department of Philosophy at the University of Tel Aviv. His specialty is the philosophy of language and political philosophy. Matar has been an activist against military occupation of the Palestinian territories for many years. She is currently active in the Israeli committee of Palestinian prisoners and has also been active in several groups that support the objectors to army service in Israel.
Mohamed Samid
Mohamed Samid is sahrawiaktivisti Moroccan occupied Western Sahara.

Bruno Jäntti
Bruno Jäntti is an investigative journalist who has worked for, inter alia, in Turkey, Northern Kurdistan and South Kurdistan. He is Vice Chairman of the Israeli Committee Against House Demolitions Finland.
For more information on the background
Israel occupied the Palestinian territories live the Palestinians are subject to military laws. These laws do not apply to Jews living in the region, but their purpose is only to maintain the occupation. Israeli jails are over 6,000 Palestinian political prisoners, of whom more than 400 are children. Torture of prisoners is common. About 600 of them are in jail without being against them would have been charged, or that they could have had a trial. One of them is more than 90 days on hunger strike was Mohammed al-QIQ. This week, members of the EU Parliament have appealed on behalf of the EU to put pressure on Israel to release the dying al-Qiqin.
Moroccan-occupied Western Sahara political trials of Saharawi activists have continued throughout the 70-century that began the occupation of the time. Occupation in the early days of mass arrests, and the liberation movement Polisario continues to have unresolved for more than six hundred Sahrawi "disappearance". According to human rights forced confessions through torture are commonplace in Morocco. In recent years, have also been reported Sahrawi activists deaths in prison due to a lack of health care. Being winning a number of Sahrawi activists have been on hunger strike in prison Tizitin in order to get fair treatment.
Turkish regime has for decades been using the broad 'anti-terrorist' legislation tens of thousands of political activists, politicians and journalists in the preparations of the prosecution of non-violent opinions or activities if they have been critical of the Government's policies, especially if they are in favor of equal rights for Turkey's Kurdish population. Maltreatment of prisoners is a Turkish prison system overall.
Further information about the organizers
Israeli Committee Against House Demolitions (Israeli Committee Against House Demolitions) was founded in 1997, an Israeli NGO. It works in cooperation with the Palestinian people to end the occupation and apartheid in Israel in a way that would comply with international law and guarantee the rights of all Israeli / Palestinian citizens in the region. ICAHDilla is the UN Economic and Social Council ECOSOC (Special Consultative Status). Israeli Committee Against House Demolitions Finland was founded in 2009, the Finnish branch. ICAHD is in addition to Israel and the Finnish branches also in Australia, the UK, Norway, Germany and the United States.
was established politically and religiously independent non-governmental organization in 1949  - Finnish Peace Committee. The organization works for peace, disarmament, tolerance, human rights and global equality.


Israeli Apartheid Week: One World Behind Bars, 11.3. Helsinki

 

26.02.2016
Perjantaina 11.3. kello 17.30 Andorra, Eerikinkatu 11, Helsinki

Israeli Apartheid Week: One World Behind Bars
Yksi maailma telkien takana: miehityksen lait ja poliittiset vangit
Turkin ja Israelin/Palestiinan poliittinen kuohunta ovat otsikoissa, ja Länsi-Saharan miehitys jatkuu hiljaisuudessa. Kuolonuhrit saavat huomiota mediassa, mutta harvemmin muistetaan poliittisia vankeja, jotka viruvat vuosikausia vankiloissa. Israel, Marokko ja Turkki, kaikki EU:n liittolaisvaltioita, käyttävät oikeuslaitosta poliittisen vallankäytön välineenä.
Kello 17.30 näytetään Andorrassa israelilainen dokumentti The Law in These Parts. Elokuva käsittelee Israelin miehittämilleen palestiinalaisalueille pystyttämää sotilaslakien järjestelmää, sen kehittäneiden tuomarien haastattelujen kautta. Elokuva oli ensimmäinen kerta kun he suostuivat haastateltaviksi. The Law in These Parts on palkittu mm. Sundance Film Festivalilla ja Jerusalem Film Festivalilla.
Kello 19.30 on keskustelu poliittisista vangeista Israelissa/Palestiinassa, miehitetyssä Länsi-Saharassa ja Turkissa. Mukana ovat israelilainen filosofi ja aktivisti Anat Matar, sahrawiaktivisti Samid Mohamed Länsi-Saharasta sekä journalisti ja aktivisti Bruno Jäntti. ICAHD Finlandin puheenjohtaja Syksy Räsänen puheenjohtaa tilaisuuden.
Tilaisuus, elokuva mukaan lukien, on maksuton eikä vaadi ennakkoilmoittautumista. Elokuvassa on englanninkieliset tekstit ja keskustelu on englanniksi.
Tilaisuuden järjestävät ICAHD Finland ja Suomen Rauhanpuolustajat. Tilaisuus on osa maailmanlaajuista tapahtumaa Israeli Apartheid Week, jonka tavoitteena on lisätä tietoisuutta Israelin apartheid-järjestelmästä. Israeli Apartheid Week sai alkunsa Torontossa vuonna 2005, ja nykyään tilaisuuksia on vuosittain yli sadassa kaupungissa ympäri maailmaa.
Elokuvan The Law in These Parts traileri: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rzEy-FPw-iQ
Elokuvan The Law in These Parts www-sivu: https://www.thelawfilm.com/eng
Israeli Apartheid Weekin www-sivu: http://apartheidweek.org/
Lisätietoja www-sivulla: http://www.icahd.fi/?p=5867
===============================================


Maailma telkien takana

24.2.2016
TIEDOTE
Maailma telkien takana: miehityksen lait ja poliittiset vangit
Elokuva ja asiantuntijoiden keskustelutilaisuus Helsingissä osana Israelin apartheid -viikkoa
Turkin ja Israelin/Palestiinan poliittinen kuohunta ovat otsikoissa, ja Länsi-Saharan miehitys jatkuu hiljaisuudessa. Kuolonuhrit saavat huomiota mediassa, mutta harvemmin muistetaan poliittisia vankeja, jotka viruvat vuosikausia vankiloissa. Israel, Marokko ja Turkki, kaikki EU:n liittolaisvaltioita, käyttävät oikeuslaitosta poliittisen vallankäytön välineenä.
Tätä käsitellään tilaisuudessa ”One World Behind Bars” perjantaina 11.3. kello 17.30 elokuvateatteri Andorrassa, osoitteessa Eerikinkatu 11.
Kello 17.30 näytetään Andorrassa israelilainen dokumentti The Law in These Parts. Elokuva käsittelee Israelin miehittämilleen palestiinalaisalueille pystyttämää sotilaslakien järjestelmää, sen kehittäneiden tuomarien haastattelujen kautta. Elokuva oli ensimmäinen kerta kun he suostuivat haastateltaviksi. The Law in These Parts on palkittu mm. Sundance Film Festivalilla ja Jerusalem Film Festivalilla.
Kello 19.30 on Andorrassa keskustelu poliittisista vangeista Israelissa/Palestiinassa, miehitetyssä Länsi-Saharassa ja Turkissa. Mukana ovat israelilainen filosofi ja aktivistiAnat Matar, sahrawiaktivisti Samid Mohamed Länsi-Saharasta sekä journalisti ja aktivisti Bruno Jäntti. ICAHD Finlandin puheenjohtaja Syksy Räsänen puheenjohtaa tilaisuuden.
Tilaisuus, elokuva mukaan lukien, on maksuton eikä vaadi ennakkoilmoittautumista. Elokuvassa on englanninkieliset tekstit ja keskustelu on englanniksi.
Tilaisuuden järjestävät ICAHD Finland ja Suomen Rauhanpuolustajat. Tilaisuus on osa maailmanlaajuista tapahtumaa Israeli Apartheid Week, jonka tavoitteena on lisätä tietoisuutta Israelin apartheid-järjestelmästä. Israeli Apartheid Week sai alkunsa Torontossa vuonna 2005, ja nykyään tilaisuuksia on vuosittain yli sadassa kaupungissa ympäri maailmaa.
Elokuvan The Law in These Parts traileri: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rzEy-FPw-iQ

Elokuvan The Law in These Parts www-sivu: https://www.thelawfilm.com/eng
Israeli Apartheid Weekin www-sivu: http://apartheidweek.org/
Lisätietoja: Syksy Räsänen, syksy.rasanen@iki.fi
Lisätietoa puhujista
Anat Matar
Anat Matar on vanhempi luennoitsija Tel Avivin yliopiston filosofian laitoksella. Hänen erikoisalaansa on kielen filosofia ja poliittinen filosofia. Matar on ollut palestiinalaisalueiden sotilasmiehityksen vastainen aktivisti monia vuosia. Hän on nykyään aktiivinen Israelilaisessa palestiinalaisten vankien komiteassa. Hän on myös ollut aktiivinen useissa ryhmissä, jotka tukevat armeijapalveluksesta kieltäytyviä israelilaisia.
Samid Mohamed
Samid Mohamed on sahrawiaktivisti Marokon miehittämästä Länsi-Saharasta.

Bruno Jäntti
Bruno Jäntti on tutkiva journalisti, joka on tehnyt työtä muun muassa Turkissa, Pohjois-Kurdistanissa ja Etelä-Kurdistanissa. Hän on ICAHD Finlandin varapuheenjohtaja.
Lisätietoa taustoista
Israelin miehittämillä palestiinalaisalueilla elävät palestiinalaiset ovat sotilaslakien alaisia. Näitä lakeja ei sovelleta alueella asuviin juutalaisiin, vaan niiden tarkoituksena on vain miehityksen ylläpitäminen. Israelilaisissa vankiloissa on yli 6000 poliittista palestiinalaisvankia, joista yli 400 on lapsia. Vankien kidutus on tavallista. Noin 600 heistä on vankilassa ilman, että heitä vastaan olisi nostettu syytteitä tai että he olisivat saaneet oikeudenkäynnin. Yksi heistä on yli 90 päivää nälkälakossa ollut Mohammed al-Qiq. Tällä viikolla EU-parlamentin jäsenet ovat vedonneet sen puolesta, että EU painostaisi Israelia vapauttamaan kuoleman kielissä olevan al-Qiqin.
Marokon miehittämässä Länsi-Saharassa poliittiset oikeudenkäynnit sahrawi-aktivisteja vastaan ovat jatkuneet koko 70-luvulta alkaneen miehityksen ajan. Miehityksen alkuaikoina oli joukkopidätyksiä, ja vapautusliike Polisarion mukaan edelleen on selvittämättä yli kuudensadan sahrawin ’katoaminen’. Ihmisoikeusjärjestöjen mukaan kiduttamalla pakotetut tunnustukset ovat Marokossa arkipäivää. Viime vuosina on raportoitu myös sahrawi-aktivistien kuolemista vankiloissa puutteellisen terveydenhuollon takia. Parhaillaan joukko elinkautistuomion saaneita sahrawi-aktivisteja on syömälakossa Tizitin vankilassa saadakseen oikeudenmukaisen käsittelyn.
Turkin hallinto on vuosikymmeniä käyttänyt maan laajaa ’terrorisminvastaista’ lainsäädäntöä kymmenien tuhansien poliittisten aktivistien, poliitikkojen ja journalistien laittamiseen syytteeseen lausunnoista tai väkivallattomasta toiminnasta, jos ne ovat olleet kriittisiä hallituksen politiikkaa vastaan, erityisesti jos ne ovat kannattaneet yhtäläisiä oikeuksia Turkin kurdiväestölle. Vankien kaltoin kohtelu on Turkin vankilajärjestelmässä yleistä.
Lisätietoja järjestäjistä
Israeli Committee Against House Demolitions (ICAHD) on vuonna 1997 perustettu israelilainen järjestö. Se toimii yhteistyössä palestiinalaisten kanssa Israelin miehityksen ja apartheidin lopettamiseksi tavalla, joka noudattaisi kansainvälistä oikeutta ja takaisi kaikkien Israelin/Palestiinan alueella asuvien oikeudet. ICAHDilla on YK:n Talous- ja sosiaalineuvosto ECOSOCissa erikoiskonsultaatiostatus (special consultative status). ICAHD Finland on vuonna 2009 perustettu Suomen haara. ICAHDilla on Israelin ja Suomen lisäksi haarat myös Australiassa, Iso-Britanniassa, Norjassa, Saksassa ja Yhdysvalloissa.
Suomen Rauhanpuolustajat – Fredskämparna i Finland ry on vuonna 1949 perustettu poliittisesti ja uskonnollisesti sitoutumaton kansalaisjärjestö. Järjestö toimii rauhan, aseidenriisunnan, suvaitsevaisuuden, ihmisoikeuksien ja maailmanlaajuisen tasa-arvon puolesta.
=============================


As a Jewish Israeli opposed to the state’s policies of occupation and discrimination, I know what it’s like to be smeared with claims I am a ‘traitor’ or ’self-hating Jew’. The accusation of antisemitism is also used to attack those who, like Ben, are opposed to injustice and inequality. We appreciate his work, and his focus on obtaining an inclusive, just solution for all people in this land. Dr. Anat Matar





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