The Latest Academic Boycott Attempts

10.03.22

Editorial Note

The BDS campaign against Israeli institutes and individuals has been rolling full steam.  Last week, Gerry Leisman, Professor & Research Fellow at the University of Haifa, disclosed a BDS attempt against him. He explained that he recently published a call for paper for the Journal Brain Sciences special issue entitled, “The Brain Goes to School,” where he is a guest editor. He added that they are recruiting “reviews and results of experimental studies relating to human learning, its difficulties, remediation strategies, models, cognitive science, cognitive neuropsychology all essentially attempting to translate 150 years of cognitive neuroscience into classroom applications.” Leisman sent his call to a mailing list in this field where he is a member.

Shortly after, all members of the list received an email from Dr. Karen Froud, Program Director, Neuroscience & Education Columbia University Teachers College, who urged to boycott Leisman: “Dear colleagues – I urge you to consider this request in light of the Boycotts, Divestments and Sanctions Movement for freedom and justice in Palestine. Like many / most academic institutions in Israel, Haifa University is an apartheid institution.” Froud inserted a link to the BDS movement’s website that discusses the University of Haifa. She stated that “I recognize that many of you work within this institution and hope you are also doing your part for academic freedom.” Froud is a member of the Arabic Linguistics Society who also researches Palestinian Arabic.

Clearly, Froud forgot that the BDS movement central command repeated time and again that BDS does not target individual Israelis but rather Israeli institutions.

This is not surprising, given that Froud is a pro-Palestinian activist.  She was a signatory of a 2016 petition, “Columbia University in the City of New York Faculty Petition. The signatories stated that they “stand with Columbia University Apartheid Divest, Columbia Students for Justice in Palestine as well as with Jewish Voice for Peace in calling upon the University to take a moral stance against Israel’s violence in all its forms. We demand that the University divest from corporations that supply, perpetuate, and profit… associated with the State of Israel’s military occupation.”

Trace Miller, the managing editor of the NYU student newspaper Washington Square News wrote an opinion piece titled “NYU, shut down the Tel Aviv study abroad site.” He argued that since Amnesty International released a report last month concluding that Israel is guilty of perpetrating apartheid against the Palestinians, NYU’s Tel Aviv University academic center partnership is nothing short of complicity. Miller also provided photos of the security wall between Israel and Palestine that he took, raising the question whether he was given a trip in exchange for articles. Miller self-admittedly stated that “He likes Marx,” so those familiar with the topic would assume he could be Lenin’s “Useful Idiot.”

The other BDS case pertains to an academic conference at the University of Bahrain last week. The faculty of business administration hosted “the Middle East Conference of Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business” on the 2nd and 3rd of March 2022. An Israeli scholar from the Tel Aviv University Coller School of Management presented a paper when a Kuwaiti academic delegation left the conference in protest to the Israeli presenter. The Kuwaiti delegation forgot that BDS does not target individual Israeli scholars.

The announcement of the Kuwaiti delegation leaving the conference was published by the Iranian press and was hailed by Hamas.

The three cases are all connected. BDS should be taken as a threat to Israel’s national security since the Palestinians, with the help of Iran, Qatar and Kuwait, try to mobilize the international community to delegitimize Israel. The Jerusalem Post just published an article “The long-term strategy of those seeking to destroy Israel,” a review of the recently published book Soft Threats to National Security:  Antisemitism, BDS, and the De-legitimization of Israel, co-edited by IAM’s CEO, Dr. Dana Barnett, together with Bar-Ilan University BESA Center’s former director, Prof. Efraim Karsh.

The reviewer, David Stone, wrote that the book is a “long-overdue academic review of a relatively neglected phenomenon of the soft threats to Israel’s security.” Stone has argued that Israel is facing a formidable challenge, a “long-term strategy to obliterate the Jewish state’s existence. Her enemies launched their project with conventional warfare (hard power), proceeded to the intifadas (terrorism), and – in light of the limited impact of these approaches – a global campaign of delegitimization (soft power).”  According to Stone, “This book should be compulsory reading for every Israeli politician and official with a remit for Israel’s security. By mapping out in forensic detail a growing source of serious danger to the country, one that has been quietly incubating for many decades in the shadows, these authors are sounding the alarm loudly and urgently.” 

IAM has been reporting on these issues since 2004. It is important to reiterate Stone’s pleading, “Is anyone listening?” 

References

https://www.jpost.com/opinion/article-699226

Jerusalem Post  Opinion
The long-term strategy of those seeking to destroy Israel

Editors Dana Barnett and Efraim Karsh have curated a long-overdue academic review of a relatively neglected phenomenon of the soft threats to Israel’s security.

By DAVID STONE Published: MARCH 3, 2022 15:10



Soft Threats to National Security
(photo credit: ROUTLEDGE)

Israel is currently facing a formidable challenge – the latest (third) phase of the long-term strategy to obliterate the Jewish state’s existence.

Her enemies launched their project with conventional warfare (hard power), proceeded to the intifadas (terrorism), and – in light of the limited impact of these approaches – a global campaign of delegitimization (soft power). All three phases overlap and are synergistic.

Originally published as a collection of articles in Israel Affairs (volume 27, issue 21, 2021), editors Dana Barnett and Efraim Karsh have curated a long-overdue academic review of a relatively neglected phenomenon of the soft threats to Israel’s security. These include the Boycott, Divestment and Sanctions (BDS) movement and its associated tactics of demonization and lawfare.

Gelber sets the scene by describing Israel’s failed struggle to win the propaganda war following the 1967 victory. Two weeks after the war, prime minister Eshkol called a meeting to discuss Israel’s rapidly deteriorating position in world opinion. Director-General of the PM’s Office Yaakov Herzog noted in his diary that the event had been “a totally depressing get-together.” In the ensuing years, state-initiated hasbara efforts were equally dispiriting.

Kramer warns that BDS is at least as much of a problem for diaspora (particularly American) Jews as for Israel. US Jews are a key target of BDS as they are perceived as “over-represented” in American academic specialties that are downsizing. Many Jewish scholars now have to pass a litmus test of acceptability by denouncing Israel and approving of BDS. This is classic antisemitic scapegoating in the guise of human rights.

In a dispassionate but devastating dissection, Steinberg exposes the anti-Israeli agenda of Human Rights Watch with its eye-watering $92 million annual budget. This highly influential NGO, led by Kenneth Roth since 1993, regularly hurls bile-laden accusations against Israel at the expense of far more egregious human rights violators in the MENA region and elsewhere. Roth denies accusations of antisemitism, yet his behavior suggests otherwise, such as his deployment of the old antisemitic eye for an eye trope in condemning Israeli actions.

Friesel’s chapter on Jewish (including Israeli) anti-Israelism is especially disturbing. It demonstrates the extent to which traditional Christian-based Western Jew-hatred has been internalized by many Jewish intellectuals. These self-proclaimed “progressives” appear to have lost the capacity for critical, evidence-based analysis of Zionist history and lack insight into the way their own insecurities are exploited by non-Jewish antisemites. Their negative Jewish identity borders on a collective psychopathology that is neither classically antisemitic nor adequately characterized as Jewish self-hatred.

In three chapters that cluster conveniently together, Gilboa, Mandler and Lutmar, and Derri offer powerful critiques of the ruthless methods Israel’s detractors have employed to misappropriate the foundational values of key international agencies such as the United Nations (notably its Human Rights Council) and the International Criminal Court in pursuit of their relentless and highly productive effort to vilify Israel.

Yahel – in describing the exploitation of Bedouin grievances by a variety of NGOs – reveals the multifaceted drive to portray Israel as a brutal settler apartheid state that purposely discriminates against indigenous residents and systematically violates international law. This has proved so useful to anti-Israel activists that one suspects that the Bedouin issue (now rebranded as Palestinian), like that of the 1948 Palestinian refugees, has been deliberately sustained as a running sore through the rejection of successive attempts by the Israeli government to find an equitable solution.

Stellman’s overview of the various strands of modern antisemitism – far Left, far Right, Islamist – describes how strange bedfellows bury their differences to prioritize their hostility to Jewish sovereignty. He proposes a counter strategy, namely, to turn the age-old accusation of a global Jewish conspiracy on its head by highlighting the synergy and collaboration that disparate groups of antisemitic anti-Zionists pursue in their common goal of defeating Israel through demonization.

In the penultimate chapter, Torpor suggests that those waging this covert war on Israel are attempting to tighten the noose, not only around Israel, but the Jewish world as a whole. The inevitable convergence of BDS with delegitimization and antisemitism completes the circle of hostility to the Zionist roots of the Jewish state at precisely the point at which it began: unbridled hatred of Jews both individually and collectively. Torpor calls for the dark underbelly of the BDS movement to be exposed and for further research into the transformation of legitimate criticism of Israel into antisemitism.

Atlan rounds off proceedings by tracing the history of the modern BDS phenomenon to Russian and then Soviet political warfare that laid the ideological groundwork for much subsequent anti-Israeli propaganda, particularly from the political Left, which is so familiar to us today.

This book should be compulsory reading for every Israeli politician and official with a remit for Israel’s security. By mapping out in forensic detail a growing source of serious danger to the country, one that has been quietly incubating for many decades in the shadows, these authors are sounding the alarm loudly and urgently. Is anyone listening? ■

Soft Threats to National Security
Antisemitism, BDS, and the De-legitimization of Israel

Editors: Dana Barnett, Efraim Karsh

Routledge

==================================================

Gerry Leisman

26 February at 09:41

It is not just tyrannical Russia, “wokism” and “cancel culture” that is creating the decline and fall of western civilization. It is also the tyranny of loss of freedom to think and conclusions drawn on the basis of media soundbites, political agendas, and a general lack of intellectual integrity. I share with you an email sent by a faculty person at Teacher’s College of Columbia University to numerous colleagues of mine who are potential contributors to a project in Neuroeducation. I also include my response to her. I would suggest that each of my friends understand the gravity of this event. As you know, I am Professor & Research Fellow at the University of Haifa and Professor of Restorative Neurology at Universidad de Ciencias Médicas in Cuba.

GL:

Hi,

I am the guest editor of a special issue of the Journal Brain Sciences and we are producing a special issue of the journal entitled, “The Brain Goes to School, details for which can be found at the following link:

https://www.mdpi.com/…/brai…/special_issues/brain_school

We are recruiting both reviews and results of experimental studies that relate to human learning, its difficulties, remediation strategies, models, cognitive science, cognitive neuropsychology all essentially attempting to translate 150 years of cognitive neuroscience into classroom applications…….

Karen Froud, PhD (Columbia University Teacher’s College):

“Dear colleagues –

I urge you to consider this request in light of the Boycotts, Divestments and Sanctions Movement for freedom and justice in Palestine. Like many / most academic institutions in Israel, Haifa University is an apartheid institution. https://bdsmovement.net/tags/haifa-university

I recognize that many of you work within this institution and hope you are also doing your part for academic freedom.

Warm wishes for a peaceful and just world – which after all is where educational neuroscience as a field points us.

Karen Froud, Ph.D.

Program Director, Neuroscience & Education

Columbia University Teachers College”

GL Response:

Dear Karen and the rest of the addressees on the contact list.

You, Karen, have every right to your opinion. Unfortunately, you are playing politics with science and as a science-based individual, you are making a number of assumptions based on something other than fact.

I will deal with your misconceptions in seriatim.

1. Firstly, it is quite audacious of you to claim that you support academic freedom by requesting others to shut down academic freedom. Before I begin, may I call your attention to the UN Declaration of Human Rights (1949) Article 19, which you obviously have not read, that states, “Everyone has the right to freedom of opinion and expression: this right includes freedom to hold opinions without interference and to seek, receive and impart information and ideas through any media and regardless of frontiers.” (So much for your understanding of Human Rights and Academic Freedom).

2. What you want is not a boycott but rather political pressure on second parties to pressure third parties to affect policy-change by that third party (i.e. the government the State of Israel). That is not even a secondary boycott but rather just simply bullying. So much for academic discourse on your part on an issue that has nothing to do with the project in Neuroeducation. What makes your opinions valid and those of others not? Some website? Do you base your actions on an order on a website? Your actions are inconsistent with the notion of Academic Freedom, but rather with an opinionated individual raming his/her political agenda down the throats of academics on a mailing list. This behavior does not seem to me to be supportive of Academic Freedom, but rather more consistent with the behavior of German schools and Universities of 1930’s. Would you like to ban books too – I think certain school districts in the United States already have (e.g. Maus). This is surely not how we proceed in the world of science and ideas. Now to the facts.

3. Israel is not an “Apartheid” state as you claim. Well over 40 percent of the students at the University of Haifa are of Arab descent. The Arab population of Israel is 21 percent. The enrollment of Arab minorities in higher education is approximately 17 percent – pretty close to the proportion in the population. Had you had the intellectual integrity to fact-check, you might have found that out yourself from OECD data. The same data shows that the number of students who work toward undergraduate and master’s degrees is rising. Does that sound like Apartheid to you? You should probably read a about what happened to non-“white” South Africans under Apartheid before you employ that term.

4. The recently appointed justice to the Supreme Court, Tel Aviv District Court Judge Khaled Kabub, is a Muslim. Bedouins, Israel’s indigenous Arab population, serve in the Army and many have given their lives in that regard. Israel’s population is a tapestry of Arab Muslims, Maronites, Coptics, Arameans, Assyrians, Druse, Caucasians (not the one’s on your university’s diversity forms), Circassians, Samaritans, Vietnamese, not to mention refugees from Eritrea, South Sudan, as well as refugees (non-Jewish) from Bosnia and Kosovo, besides the Jewish population, 60 percent of whom derive from Arab lands and Egypt as well as from non-Arab Muslim countries. Did you not know that?

4. The present government consists of a coalition that includes Dr. Mansour Abbas, leader of the Ra’am party and who de facto serves as a “kingmaker” and could easily bring the government down in a no-confidence vote.

5. Rana Raslan is an Israeli Muslim Arab woman who in 2021 became Miss Israel – that, Karen, does not happen in an Apartheid state.

6. Arab Israeli’s Hossam Haick has successfully developed technologies for sniffing out disease; Kossay Omary and Rabeeh Khoury developed miniature computers; Jamil R. Mazzawi founded Optima Design Automation, a startup developing software for self-driving cars and Mahmoud Huleihel made a breakthrough in the field of male infertility. Oh I could wax on, but investigate yourself.

7. Israel is a multi-ethnic society with its citizens sharing equal rights and hopefully equal opportunity.

8. Sixty percent of the Jewish population were heave-hoed from Arab lands. What do you have to say about that?

9. In 1948 the UN partitioned the area into a Palestinian and Jewish State, the West Bank was occupied by Jordan. I guess you had no problem with that. A year prior, 25 August 1947, the UN did the same when it created West and East Pakistan (later Bangaladesh), Muslim countries, and separated them from India. The largest population move in human history occurred as result. The partition displaced between 10 and 20 million people along religious lines, creating overwhelming refugee crises in the newly constituted dominions. The result of that is still ongoing and violent and it is the Punjab. Got nothing to say?

9. Maybe I should boycott your institution for suppressing the voices and academic freedom of people who oppose your views. Maybe I should boycott US universities because your government has lied since its inception about the ideals of equality to wit, 3/5 human being, Alien and Sedition Act, Jew quotas in universities (including yours), lynchings of ethnic undesirables oh, and slavery. Maybe the USA should start thinking about giving back the Kingdom of Hawaii. Maybe you should boycott the University of Hawaii and all other American universities to pressure the US government to give it back.

10. More importantly right now, you have the audacity to attempt to shut down the free exchange of scientific ideas assuming that I am a full-time member of the faculty of the University of Haifa in Israel. Had you even bothered to look at my affiliation you might have noted that I hold a dual appointment at the University of the Medical Science of Havana in Cuba (appointment letter attached). Please read it and you will note that although Cuba and Israel do not have diplomatic relations, I was appointed by the Cuban Ministry of Health and by the Rectorate of Universidad de Ciencias Médicas de la Habana, of the Communist Republic of Cuba AS AN ISRAELI ACADEMIC (see link). Seems that the Cubans who understand embargo and have tough life largely owing to political forces in the USA, of which you seem to have no interest, especially understand the importance of Academic Freedom and the notion of the need to, “receive and impart information and ideas through any media and regardless of frontiers.”

11. With the world in the present state that it is in and possibly heading to WW III and nuclear threats coming from Russia, please relate to the concept of proportional thinking.

12. I don’t know if I can change your thinking as it seems that you have fomented opinions already. However, you need to apologize, at the very least, to the individuals on this list, for not dealing with me directly so that you could voice your concerns and I could listen and discuss ideas with you and you with me. That is what we do in academia. I expect nothing less.

Sincerely, Gerry Leisman

===========================================

Opinion: NYU, shut down the Tel Aviv study abroad site

Amnesty International released a report last month concluding that Israel is guilty of perpetrating apartheid and other violations of international law against Palestinians. NYU’s Tel Aviv academic center and partnership with Tel Aviv University is nothing short of complacency and, by extension, complicity.

By Trace Miller, Managing Editor
March 1, 2022

NYU should shut down its Tel Aviv study abroad site. Maintaining an academic center in Israel signals complacency toward — and, thereby, complicity in — the apartheid, crimes against humanity and other violations of international law that the state of Israel perpetrates against Palestinians.

On Feb. 1, Amnesty International joined a U.N. special rapporteurHuman Rights Watch, and the Israeli human rights organizations Yesh Din and B’Tselem in concluding that the state of Israel is guilty of perpetrating these crimes.

This is not a groundbreaking revelation. Palestinians have been detailing the realities of Israeli apartheid and calling for its recognition as such for more than two decades, according to the Amnesty report. In November 2019, a coalition of Palestinian human rights organizations submitted a report to the U.N. Committee on the Elimination of Racial Discrimination concluding that Israel “has created and maintained an apartheid regime.”

More recently, in April 2021, the Palestinian Human Rights Organizations Council submitted an amicus brief to the CERD arguing that Israel’s violations of the U.N. International Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Racial Discrimination must be analyzed in the context of the convention’s third article, which condemns apartheid and racial segregation and undertakes “to prevent, prohibit and eradicate all practices of this nature in territories under [the signatories’] jurisdiction.” Israel signed ICERD in 1966 and ratified it in 1979. Its infringement of ICERD’s third article — as well as multiple other articles — was reported with concern by the CERD in 20072012 and 2020

A system of violence and discrimination

The nature and specifics of Israel’s crimes against Palestinians is detailed in all these reports. To summarize these crimes is to pass judgment on which particulars of a totalizing — and arguably totalitarian — system of violence and discrimination are most worthy of mentioning. But summarize we must in order to condemn.

Jerusalem-based author and journalist Nathan Thrall reports in the “London Review of Books,” that “Israelis and Palestinians in the same territory … are tried in different courts, one military, one civilian, for the same crime committed on the same street.” Israel denies Palestinians the freedoms of expression, assembly, movement and habeas corpus. 

“The discrimination is not just national — by Israelis against Palestinians who lack citizenship — but ethnic, by Jews against Palestinian subjects and citizens alike,” Thrall writes.

The state of Israel is guilty of grave violations of Palestinians’ most basic human and civil rights: Palestinians are subjected to discriminationviolenceforced displacement and ethnic cleansing. Israel’s status as an apartheid state has been recognized by numerous national and international human rights organizations. Moreover, Israel reserves the right to ban activists involved in Jewish Voice for Peace or the Boycott, Divestment and Sanctions movement — and even to deny entry to foreigners who have called for a boycott of Israel or its settlements. These actions are illegal under international law. 

NYU cannot, in good conscience, operate an academic center in an apartheid state while claiming in its non-discrimination and anti-harassment policy to be committed to creating an environment free of harassment and discrimination based on race, color, creed, religion, national origin, ethnicity or citizenship status.

Anti-apartheid action at the university

Taking action against apartheid within NYU is not unprecedented. The NYU Student Senators Council voted unanimously in 1985 to divest from corporations doing business with the state of South Africa “in recognition of the abhorrent discriminatory practices of the government of South Africa.” The Graduate Student Organizing Committee — the graduate student worker union at NYU — voted to join the BDS movement and called for the university to shut down its Tel Aviv campus in 2016. 

NYU president Andrew Hamilton responded to the GSOC vote with a statement reading “a boycott of Israeli academics and institutions is contrary to our core principles of academic freedom, [and] antithetical to the free exchange of ideas.” Hamilton flatly stated that “divestment from Israeli-related investments is not under consideration.”

Two years later, in 2018, the NYU student government passed a resolution to divest from corporations “involved in the violation of Palestinian human rights,” including Caterpillar and General Electric, which still equip NYU with power, and Lockheed Martin, a corporate partner of the Tandon School of Engineering. Later that year, the Department of Social and Cultural Analysis pledged non-cooperation with NYU Tel Aviv until Israel grants academic freedom to all regardless of ancestry or political speech. Non-cooperation means the department neither sponsors faculty teaching at the Tel Aviv campus nor utilizes “any of its resources to facilitate faculty exchanges between the department and the [study abroad] program.”

In response to the student government vote, the university administration stated that it would not divest because “the endowment should not be used for making political statements.” Nevertheless, faculty and student groups have continued organizing against the Tel Aviv study away site. Faculty of Color for an Anti-Racist NYU pledged non-cooperation with NYU Tel Aviv in June 2021; their open letter was signed by hundreds of faculty, alumni, staff, and undergraduate and graduate students, as well as multiple student organizations. Just this past year, the NYU Review of Law & Social Change committed to BDS. And in mid-2020, GSOC condemned NYU’s decision to include the academic center in its list of Go Local sites and called for its closure. 

GSOC called for the academic center’s closure in 2016, not only because of Israel’s discriminatory entry laws, but also because of NYU Tel Aviv’s partnership with Tel Aviv University, which is built atop the razed Palestinian village of Shaykh Muwannis. This partnership involves internships at TAU’s medical and scientific laboratories for NYU students as well as access to the university’s library. TAU is a well-regarded research university. Not well-reported, however, is the university’s role in collaborating with the Israel Defense Forces and perpetrating the state of Israel’s war crimes against Palestinians.

The Palestine Society at SOAS University of London published a report in February 2009 detailing TAU’s complicity in Israel’s invasions of Lebanon in 2006 and Gaza in 2008, the role of university institutes in writing Israel’s security policies and war tactics, and the involvement of university faculty and researchers in military research and development. According to the Palestine Society, TAU professor Asa Kasher wrote the IDF code of ethics justifying torture and assassination of soldiers and TAU researchers have called for the IDF to target civilians and civilian infrastructure rather than militants and military infrastructure in its wars against Hamas and Hezbollah.

The number of NYU faculty and student organizations and university institutions that have organized against the Tel Aviv academic center is inspiring and indicative. Thousands of members of the NYU community oppose their university’s presence in an apartheid state and its collaboration with an institution complicit in war crimes and other crimes against humanity.

The NYU administration, however, continues to reject petitions to boycott or shutter NYU Tel Aviv because the demands are “at odds with the tenets of academic freedom” and would suppress free speech, debate and exchange of ideas. Regrettably, our university president and spokespeople have failed to recognize that there neither is, nor can be, so-called academic freedom in a nation that denies the freedoms of expression, assembly, movement and habeas corpus to portions of its population because of their race, color, creed, religion, national origin, ethnicity or citizenship status. 

Hamilton, like most liberal U.S. academics, has no qualms denouncing violence and violations of human rights when they come from further right on the political spectrum or are directed at white Europeans. However, he draws the line at denouncing this instance of Western imperialist violence against people of color. The words “occupation in Palestine” seemingly fill him with nothing close to dread or sorrow — otherwise he might denounce Israeli apartheid.

The state of Israel is guilty of apartheid, crimes against humanity and other violations of international law. TAU is complicit in war crimes. And yet, NYU maintains an academic center in Israel — thereby discriminating against Palestinians and supporters of BDS — in partnership with TAU, tacitly endorsing the violence of the nation’s colonial project. Such a situation begs the question: Would NYU have maintained a campus in South Africa in the 1980s as its students protested it?

Enough is enough. To NYU senior leadership and the board of trustees, I say, bring the university in line with its own ideals and policies. End the university’s implicit endorsement of apartheid and war crimes. Shut down the Tel Aviv academic center.

Views expressed in the Opinion section do not necessarily reflect those of WSN, and our publication of opinions is not an endorsement of them.

Contact Trace Miller at tmiller@nyunews.com.

Trace Miller is a CAS sophomore studying comparative literature and libidinal economics. He likes Marx, hates writing and loves Hegelian sauce. 

============================================

https://www.middleeastmonitor.com/20220305-kuwait-leaves-bahrain-conference-due-to-israels-attendance/Kuwait leaves Bahrain conference due to Israel’s attendance

March 5, 2022 at 11:06 am

A Kuwaiti academic delegation left a scientific conference held at the University of Bahrain in protest against the attendance of an Israeli delegation, Al Khaleej reported on Friday.

The Kuwaiti Youth League for Jerusalem posted on Twitter: “The delegation of Kuwaiti universities leaves a lecture delivered by an Israeli from Tel Aviv University held at Bahrain University.”

It added: “All salute to the delegation… Normalisation has been and will continue to be tyranny.”

Head of Kuwaiti Youth League for Jerusalem Mosaab Al-Motawaa stated: “The withdrawal of the Kuwaiti delegation reiterated the official Kuwaiti stance which is clear towards rejecting all forms of normalisation with the occupation.”

Al-Motawaa added: “Such a stance became one of the weapons that hurt the Israeli occupation entity that causes harm to it.”

The faculty of business administration at the University of Bahrain announced holding a conference on 2 and 3 March, without noting that an Israeli delegation was participating in the event.

In January, a Kuwaiti cultural delegation boycotted the Emirates Airline Festival of Literature due to the participation of an Israeli writer.

The United Arab Emirates and Bahrain signed normalisation deals with Israel in September 2020. Former US President Donald Trump brokered the deal.

==========================================

https://english.alahednews.com.lb/64363/390
Kuwaiti Delegation Withdraws from Bahrain Conference over “Israeli” Participation

06.03.22
By Staff, Agencies

An academic delegation from Kuwait decided to pull out of a conference hosted by the University of Bahrain after finding out that an “Israeli” delegation would participate in the event.
The move comes as Kuwait has frequently reiterated its support for Palestine.
The Kuwaiti Youth Association for Al-Quds announced in a post published on Twitter that organizers of the conference at the largest public university in Bahrain had announced the occasion, but had not included the “Israeli” participants in the delegates page.
“The withdrawal of the Kuwaiti academics from the conference reflects Kuwait’s official position as to rejection of any form of normalization of relations with the Zionist regime,” Musab Al-Mutawa, head of the association, said.
He further told Al-Quds Press News Agency that such positions serve as a lever of pressure against the occupying Tel Aviv regime.
Al-Mutawa also underscored that Kuwait’s support for the Palestinian cause and Palestinians’ struggle for liberation from the “Israeli” occupation will remain fairly solid and unswerving.
Meanwhile, the Palestinian Hamas resistance movement has praised the decision by a Kuwaiti academic delegation to pull out of a conference in Bahrain because of the “Israeli” participation.
“Such valued positions by the Kuwaiti leadership and people go in harmony with the Muslim world’s conscience, and are recorded in the lists of honor and pride,” Hamas spokesman Hazem Qasem said in a statement on Saturday.
In parallel, he added that the decision to withdraw from an academic event attended by “Israeli” delegates reflected Kuwait’s unflagging support for the Palestinian nation, and their struggle to free their lands and holy sites.
In May last year, Kuwait’s National Assembly unanimously approved bills that outlaw any deals or normalization of ties with Tel Aviv.

=========================================

http://bahrainmirror.com/en/news/61265.html
Al-Wefaq Commends Kuwaiti Professors who Withdrew from Bahrain University Conference due to Israel’s Participation

2022-03-06

Bahrain Mirror: The Al-Wefaq National Islamic Society greeted the Kuwaiti delegation that withdrew from a conference hosted by the University of Bahrain in protest against the participation of an Israeli delegation.

Al-Wefaq said via its Twitter account that it “salutes the authentic Arab stance taken by Kuwaiti educators in their honorable withdrawal, refraining from taking part in the crime of normalization committed at the University of Bahrain, and their refusal to participate in the scientific conference in which academics from the usurping entity are taking part in, expressing the principled position of all the peoples of the free Arab and Islamic world that reject all forms of normalization with the temporary entity on the land of Palestine.”

The faculty of business administration at the University of Bahrain announced holding “The Middle East Conference for the Development of Business Administration Colleges” on the 2nd and 3rd of March, without noting that an Israeli delegation will be participating in the event.

The Kuwaiti Youth League for Jerusalem confirmed via Twitter that the withdrawal of the Kuwaiti academic delegation confirms Kuwait’s clear and official position towards rejecting normalization with Israel in all its forms.

=========================================

https://www.tasnimnews.com/he/news/2022/03/06/2677231/%D7%9E%D7%A9%D7%9C%D7%97%D7%AA-%D7%90%D7%A7%D7%93%D7%9E%D7%99%D7%AA-%D7%9B%D7%95%D7%95%D7%99%D7%AA-%D7%A4%D7%95%D7%A8%D7%A9%D7%AA-%D7%9E%D7%95%D7%95%D7%A2%D7%99%D7%93%D7%AA-%D7%91%D7%97%D7%A8%D7%99%D7%99%D7%9F-%D7%91%D7%A9%D7%9C-%D7%94%D7%A9%D7%AA%D7%AA%D7%A4%D7%95%D7%AA-%D7%99%D7%A9%D7%A8%D7%90%D7%9C%D7%99%D7%AA

Iranian Tasnim News

משלחת אקדמית כווית פורשת מוועידת בחריין בשל השתתפות ישראלית

March, 06, 2022 – 10:05 חדשות עולם

משלחת אקדמית של כווית החליטה לפרוש מכנס בהנחיית אוניברסיטת בחריין לאחר שגילתה כי משלחת ישראלית תשתתף באירוע, שכן ממלכת המפרץ הפרסי חזרה על תמיכתה בפלסטין.

אגודת הנוער הכוויתי למען אל-קודס הודיעה בפוסט שפורסם בטוויטר כי מארגני הכנס באוניברסיטה הציבורית הגדולה בבחריין הכריזו על האירוע, אך לא כללו את המשתתפים הישראלים בדף הנציגים.

“הנסיגה של האקדמאים הכוויתים מהוועידה משקפת את עמדתה הרשמית של כווית באשר לדחייה של כל צורה של נורמליזציה של היחסים עם המשטר הציוני”, אמר מוסעב אל-מוטווה, ראש האגודה.

הוא אמר לסוכנות הידיעות קודס פרס כי תפקידים כאלה משמשים מנוף לחץ נגד המשטר התל אביבי הכובש.

מוטווה גם הדגיש כי תמיכתה של כווית בעניין הפלסטיני ומאבק הפלסטינים לשחרור מהכיבוש הישראלי יישארו מוצקים למדי ובלתי מעורערים.

חמאס מברך על פרישת כווית מהוועידה בה השתתפו נציגים ישראלים

בינתיים, תנועת ההתנגדות הפלסטינית של חמאס שיבחה את החלטתה של משלחת אקדמית כווית לפרוש מכנס בבחריין בגלל השתתפותם של ישראלים.

“עמדות מוערכות כאלה של ההנהגה והאנשים הכוויתים הולכות בהרמוניה עם מצפונו של העולם המוסלמי, ומתועדות ברשימות של כבוד וגאווה”, אמר דובר חמאס חאזם קאסם בהצהרה ביום שבת.

הוא הוסיף כי ההחלטה לפרוש מאירוע אקדמי בהשתתפות נציגים ישראלים משקפת את תמיכתה הבלתי פוסקת של כווית באומה הפלסטינית, ואת מאבקה לשחרר את אדמותיה ואת האתרים הקדושים שלה.

כווית מתנגדת נחרצות לנורמליזציה של הקשרים עם ישראל, בניגוד לכמה מדינות ערביות באזור, שחתמו בשנים האחרונות על הסכמי נורמליזציה עם משטר הכיבוש.

במאי אשתקד אישרה האסיפה הלאומית של כווית פה אחד הצעות חוק המוציאות מחוץ לחוק כל עסקה או נורמליזציה של קשרים עם המשטר בתל אביב.

ב-18 באוגוסט 2020, 37 מחוקקים בכווית קראו לממשלתם לדחות הסכם נורמליזציה בין ישראל לאיחוד האמירויות הערביות (איחוד האמירויות).

הסנטימנטים האנטי-ישראליים גבוהים בכווית. סקר שנערך בשנת 2019 על ידי מכון וושינגטון למדיניות המזרח הקרוב, צוות חשיבה אמריקאי, הראה כי 85% מהכוויתים מתנגדים לנורמליזציה של הקשרים עם ישראל.

עוד בספטמבר 2020, איחוד האמירויות של ארם ובחריין חתמו על הסכמי נורמליזציה עם ישראל. מאוחר יותר חתמו מרוקו וסודאן על הסכמים דומים גם עם המשטר הישראלי.

מה שנקרא הסכם אברהם נדחף על ידי ארצות הברית תחת הנשיא לשעבר דונלד טראמפ.

הפלסטינים גינו את עסקאות הנורמליזציה, ותיארו אותן כ”דקירה בגב” ו”בגידה” במטרתם.

===========================================================

Google Translate

Youth of Jerusalem – Kuwait
@K8_4_Quds
They invite us to visit our usurped land that was occupied by their criminal entity.. Then they call them academic and scientific meetings!!
The delegation of Kuwait universities withdraws from a lecture given by an Israeli from Tel Aviv University, which was held at the University of Bahrain
Greetings to the delegation
And #normalization_betrayal was and will remain


شباب القدس- الكويت

@Q8_4_Quds

يدعوننا لزيارة أرضنا المغتصبة التي احتلها كيانهم المجرم .. ثم يسمونها لقاءات أكاديمية وعلمية !! وفد جامعات الكويت ينسحب من محاضرة يلقيها اسرائيلي من جامعة تل ابيب المنعقد في جامعة البحرين تحية للوفد و #التطبيع_خيانة كان وسيظل

========================================

https://apartheiddivest.org/faculty

COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY IN THE CITY OF NEW YORK

FACULTY PETITION

As both scholars and community members, we are professionally, intellectually, and morally invested in our University. We deem it our duty to hold our institution accountable for the ethical implications of its own actions, notably its financial investments and their implications around the world. In particular, we take issue with our financial involvements in institutions associated with the State of Israel’s military occupation of Palestinian lands, continued violations of Palestinian human rights, systematic destruction of life and property, inhumane segregation and systemic forms of discrimination.

In 2002, faculty members across various departments called for an end to our investment in all firms that supplied Israel’s military with arms and military hardware. Students, alumni, faculty, and staff agreed to attach their name to a call to remove the State of Israel’s social license in its use of asymmetrical and excessive violence against Palestinian civilians.

We now stand with Columbia University Apartheid Divest, Columbia Students for Justice in Palestine as well as with Jewish Voice for Peace in calling upon the University to take a moral stance against Israel’s violence in all its forms. We demand that the University divest from corporations that supply, perpetuate, and profit from a system that has subjugated the Palestinian people for over 68 years. We note that our position unequivocally stands in support of a non-violent movement privileging human rights as the only means toward finding a political resolution.

We call on our University to recognize its undeniable role in, and influence upon, global systems, a distinguished role that comes with a commensurately weighty measure of moral accountability.

Signatories

Nadia Abu El-Haj | Anthropology, Barnard Lila Abu Lughod | Anthropology, Columbia Gil Anidjar | Religion & MESAAS, Columbia Zainab Bahrani | Art History & Archaeology, Columbia Brian Boyd | Anthropology, Columbia Allison Busch | MESAAS, Columbia Partha Chatterjee | Anthropology & MESAAS, Columbia Hamid Dabashi | MESAAS, Columbia E. Valentine Daniel | Anthropology, Columbia Katherine Franke | Law, Columbia Victoria de Grazia | History, Columbia Robert Gooding-Williams | Philosophy & IRAAS, Columbia Stathis Gourgouris | English & Comparative Literature, Columbia Farah Griffin | English & Comparative Literature, Columbia Wael Hallaq | MESAAS, Columbia Marianne Hirsch | English & Comparative Literature, Columbia Jean Howard | English & Comparative Literature, Columbia Rashid Khalidi | History & MESAAS, Columbia Mahmood Mamdani | Anthropology & MESAAS, Columbia Joseph Massad | MESAAS, Columbia Brinkley Messick | Anthropology & MESAAS, Columbia Timothy Mitchell | MESAAS, Columbia Rosalind Morris | Anthropology, Columbia Frederick Neuhouser | Philosophy, Barnard Mae Ngai | History, Columbia Gregory Pflugfelder | History & EALAC, Columbia Sheldon Pollock | MESAAS, Columbia Elizabeth Povinelli | Anthropology, Columbia Wayne L. Proudfoot | Philosophy, Columbia Anupama Rao | History & Human Rights, Barnard Bruce Robbins | English & Comparative Literature, Columbia George Saliba | MESAAS, Columbia Dirk Salomons | SIPA, Columbia David Scott | Anthropology, Columbia Avinoam Shalem | Art History & Archaeology, Columbia Gayatri Chakravorty Spivak | English & Comparative Literature, Columbia Neferti Tadiar | Women’s, Gender & Sexuality Studies, Barnard Michael Taussig | Anthropology, Columbia Marc Van De Mieroop | History, Columbia Gauri Viswanathan | English & Comparative Literature, Columbia Paige West | Anthropology, Barnard Michael Harris | Mathematics, Columbia Jonathan Crary | Art History & Archaeology, Columbia Shamus Khan | Sociology, Columbia Zoe Crossland | Anthropology, Columbia Steven Gregory | Anthropology, Columbia James Schamus | Film, Columbia Abeer Shaheen | MESAAS, Columbia Elizabeth Bernstein | Sociology, Barnard J. Blake Turner | Psychiatry, Columbia Lydia Goehr | Philosophy, Columbia Danielle Haase-Dubosc | French & Romance Philology, Columbia Peter Marcuse | GSAPP, Columbia Gray Tuttle | EALAC, Columbia Rebecca Jordan-Young | Women’s, Gender, & Sexuality Studies, Barnard Josh Whitford | Sociology, Columbia Ross Hamilton | English, Barnard Nora Akawi | GSAPP, Columbia Taylor Carman | Philosophy, Barnard Reinhold Martin | GSAPP, Columbia Branden W. Joseph | Art History, Columbia Felicity Scott | GSAPP, Columbia Audra Simpson | Anthropology, Columbia Carol Benson | International & Comparative Education, Columbia Michael Thaddeus | Mathematics, Columbia Karen Froud | Neuroscience & Education, Columbia John Collins | Philosophy, Columbia Joshua Simon | Political Science, Columbia Muhsin al-Musawi | MESAAS, Columbia D. Max Moerman | Asian & Middle Eastern Cultures, Barnard Edgar Rivera Colón | Narrative Medicine, Columbia Gregory Mann | History, Columbia Keith Moxey | Art History, Columbia Patricia Dailey | English & Comparative Literature, Columbia Pablo A. Piccato | History, Columbia Elizabeth Irwin | Classics, Columbia Ann Douglas | English & Comparative Literature, Columbia Emmanuelle Saada | French & Romance Philology, Columbia

If you’re a member of the Columbia/Barnard faculty, click here to sign the petition.

Alon Confino & Raef Zreik Abuse their Positions to Promote Political Agenda

03.03.22

Editorial Note

Next week, the Institute for Holocaust, Genocide, and Memory Studies at the University of Massachusetts, Amherst, is hosting a Webinar, “in conversation with Prof. Raef Zreik,” the co-director of the Minerva Center for the Humanities at Tel Aviv University, an associate Professor at Ono Academic College, and a senior researcher at the Van Leer Institute in Jerusalem. Zreik will talk about the Arab intellectuals’ letter condemning antisemitism and rejecting the IHRA working definition of antisemitism.  The Webinar organizer is Prof. Alon Confino of the University of Massachusetts Amherst and Ben Gurion University. Confino is a political activist who pushes for the equivalence of the Holocaust to the Palestinian self-inflicted Nakba.

In November 2020, a group of 122 Arab scholars, journalists and intellectuals published an open letter “unconditionally condemning antisemitism while at the same time vehemently rejecting the IHRA working definition of antisemitism.” Admittedly, Zreik was among the initiators and drafters of the letter. The group stated that, “In recent years, the fight against antisemitism has been increasingly instrumentalized by the Israeli government and its supporters in an effort to delegitimize the Palestinian cause and silence defenders of Palestinian rights. Diverting the necessary struggle against antisemitism to serve such an agenda threatens to debase this struggle and hence to discredit and weaken it,” as the invitation to the Webinar reads. During the Webinar Zreik will “elaborate on his views about antisemitism, the fight against it and it’s political instrumentalization within the context of the Palestinian-Israeli conflict.” 

Worth noting, the full text by the group condemns antisemitism on the one hand yet allows antisemitism to flourish on the other. 

The letter states that “Antisemitism must be debunked and combated. Regardless of pretext, no expression of hatred for Jews as Jews should be tolerated anywhere in the world. Antisemitism manifests itself in sweeping generalizations and stereotypes about the Jews, regarding power and money in particular, along with conspiracy theories and Holocaust denial. We regard as legitimate and necessary the fight against such attitudes. We also believe that the lessons of the Holocaust as well as those of other genocides of modern times must be part of the education of new generations against all forms of racial prejudice and hatred.”

But according to the authors, the IHRA definition “discards as antisemitic all non-Zionist visions” and “conflates Judaism with Zionism in assuming that all Jews are Zionists,” and that “the State of Israel in its current reality embodies the self-determination of all Jews.” The authors argue, “We profoundly disagree with this.” They also claim “The fight against antisemitism should not be turned into a stratagem to delegitimize the fight against the oppression of the Palestinians, the denial of their rights, and the continued occupation of their land.” The fight against antisemitism should be as part of “the fight against all forms of racism and xenophobia, including Islamophobia, anti-Arab, and anti-Palestinian racism.” And that “We believe that human values and rights are indivisible and that the fight against antisemitism should go hand in hand with the struggle on behalf of all oppressed peoples and groups for dignity, equality, and emancipation.”

The authors believe that Israel created “a Jewish majority by way of ethnic cleansing… the self-determination of a Jewish population in Palestine/Israel has been implemented in the form of an ethnic exclusivist and territorially expansionist state… the State of Israel is based on uprooting the vast majority of the natives – what Palestinians and Arabs refer to as the Nakba – and on subjugating those natives who still live on the territory of historical Palestine as either second-class citizens or people under occupation, denying them their right to self-determination.” 

They argue that “The IHRA definition of antisemitism and the related legal measures adopted in several countries have been deployed mostly against leftwing and human rights groups supporting Palestinian rights and the Boycott Divestment and Sanctions (BDS) campaign… a legitimate non-violent means of struggle for Palestinian rights.”

Specifically, the IHRA definition example of antisemitism, “Denying the Jewish people their right to self-determination, e.g., by claiming that the existence of a State of Israel is a racist endeavor,” according to the authors, is “quite odd. It does not bother to recognize that under international law the current State of Israel has been an occupying power for over half a century, as recognized by the governments of countries where the IHRA definition is being upheld.”

The authors argue that “The demand by Palestinians for their right of return to the land from which they themselves, their parents and grandparents were expelled cannot be construed as antisemitic… To level the charge of antisemitism against anyone who regards the existing State of Israel as racist, notwithstanding the actual institutional and constitutional discrimination upon which it is based, amounts to granting Israel absolute impunity… The IHRA definition and the way it has been deployed prohibit any discussion of the Israeli state as based on ethno-religious discrimination.” 

The authors claim that “The suppression of Palestinian rights in the IHRA definition betrays an attitude upholding Jewish privilege in Palestine instead of Jewish rights, and Jewish supremacy over Palestinians instead of Jewish safety.”

However, the authors of the public letter are wrong; the IHRA definition does not conflate Judaism with Zionism nor claims that all Jews are Zionists. It doesn’t even claim that Israel embodies the self-determination of all Jews. Of course, there are Jews who are anti-Zionists. The IHRA definition does not discuss them, and this is not what the IHRA definition speaks of, rather, according to the IHRA definition, negating the right of Jews to self-determination is antisemitic.

The authors are claiming that the fight against antisemitism should not delegitimize the fight against the oppression of the Palestinians, the denial of their rights, and the continued occupation of their land.   The IHRA definition of antisemitism has not denied such right but insisted that double standards exist when it comes to criticizing Israel while letting off the hook other countries in which Palestinians live and are discriminated against, swuch as Lebanon, is an example.  The situation in The Gaza Strip, which is under the violent, authoritarian rule of Hamas and Palestinian Islamic Jihad is even more perilous for the Palestinians.  Even in the relatively liberal West Bank, persecutions and even killings of opponents of Mahmoud Abbas are not extraordinary.  Supporters of the Palestinians who have never missed an opportunity to bash Israel have kept conspicuously quiet about such cases.  Until pro-Palestinian activists sound an alarm about these cases, they should be charged with practicing double standards, which is the epitome of antisemitism per the IHRA definition.

It is hardly surprising that Confino would host Zreik to discuss the alleged bias of IHRA.  Confino pushed the equivalency between the Holocaust to the Palestinian Nakba. By equating the Nakba to the Holocaust, Confino reduces the scale of the Holocaust, which is antisemitic.  For years, he and other like-minded scholars have, as IAM illustrated, produced a sizable body of literature making the outrageous claim that the Palestinians were subjected to something equivalent to the Nazi genocide that took the lives of six million Jews.   Sadly, the current state of academic discourse not only tolerates this type of “scholarship” but makes its authors eligible for positions in Western universities. Confino and Zreik are good examples of this trend.   

References

https://www.umass.edu/ihgms/event/encounters-conversation-raef-zreik

The University of Massachusetts Amherst
Institute for Holocaust, Genocide, and Memory Studies
Events

Online via ZOOM Webinar
DATE & TIME   March 8th 2022 1:00pm – 3:00pm
EMAIL:   ihgms@umass.edu
ZOOM Webinar Registration Link  https://umass-amherst.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_NYJGgn8QSWO9TC_vQAdiLQ“Encounters”: A Conversation with Raef Zreik

March 8, 2022, 1:00PM (EST) / 20:00 (Israel time)
A Conversation with Raef Zreik on the Arab intellectuals’ letter condemning antisemitism and rejecting the IHRA working definition of antisemitism

In November 2020, a group of 122 Arab scholars, journalists and intellectuals published an unprecedented open letter – in English, German, Hebrew, Arabic and French – unconditionally condemning antisemitism while at the same time vehemently rejecting the IHRA working definition of antisemitism. The letter states:

“In recent years, the fight against antisemitism has been increasingly instrumentalized by the Israeli government and its supporters in an effort to delegitimize the Palestinian cause and silence defenders of Palestinian rights. Diverting the necessary struggle against antisemitism to serve such an agenda threatens to debase this struggle and hence to discredit and weaken it.”

Dr. Raef Zreik was among the initiators and drafters of this letter. In this encounter he will elaborate on his views about antisemitism, the fight against it and it’s political instrumentalization within the context of the Palestinian-Israeli conflict.

Dr. Raef Zreik is co-director of the Minerva Center for the Humanities at Tel Aviv University, an associate Professor at Ono Academic College, and a senior researcher at the Van Leer Institute in Jerusalem. His fields of interest include legal and political theory, citizenship and identity, and legal interpretation.

Registration is required to attend this Webinar. Register in advance here:
https://umass-amherst.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_NYJGgn8QSWO9TC_vQAdiLQ

PROGRAMS

(2021-2022) “Encounters: Conversations on Racism, Antisemitism, and Islamophobia”
(2021-2022) Five College Working Group: “Race, Indigeneity, Settler Colonialism in Global Perspective”.
(2021-2022) IHGMS Seminar Workshop – Genealogies of Self-Reflection: Writing in the Wake of Trauma
Past Programs

=================================================

https://www.palestine-studies.org/en/node/1650783

Intellectuals Respond to IHRA Definition of Antisemitism

AUTHOR: IPS Washington PRESS RELEASE – November 30, 2020Prominent Palestinian and Arab intellectuals have responded in a public statement to the growing adoption of the definition of antisemitism by the International Holocaust Remembrance Alliance (IHRA), and the way it is being deployed to suppress support for Palestinian rights in several European countries and North America. They argue that the fight against antisemitism is being instrumentalized by the Israeli government and its supporters to delegitimize and silence defenders of Palestinian rights. The authors of the open letter recognize antisemitism as a real and growing problem in Europe and North America in conjunction with a general increase of all types of racism and far-right movements. They are fully committed to debunking and combating it, while believing that the struggle against antisemitism properly understood is perfectly compatible with the struggle for justice for Palestinians as an anti-colonial struggle. The deployment of antisemitism in efforts to delegitimize the Palestinian cause perverts and misdirects the fight against persistent and resurgent antisemitism. The statement’s signatories understand the struggle against antisemitism to be as much of a struggle for political and human emancipation as is Palestinian resistance against occupation and statelessness.

Statement on Antisemitism and the Question of Palestine

We, the undersigned, Palestinian and Arab academics, journalists, and intellectuals, are hereby stating our views regarding the definition of antisemitism by the International Holocaust Remembrance Alliance (IHRA), and the way this definition has been applied, interpreted and deployed in several countries of Europe and North America.

In recent years, the fight against antisemitism has been increasingly instrumentalized by the Israeli government and its supporters in an effort to delegitimize the Palestinian cause and silence defenders of Palestinian rights. Diverting the necessary struggle against antisemitism to serve such an agenda threatens to debase this struggle and hence to discredit and weaken it.

Antisemitism must be debunked and combated. Regardless of pretext, no expression of hatred for Jews as Jews should be tolerated anywhere in the world. Antisemitism manifests itself in sweeping generalizations and stereotypes about the Jews, regarding power and money in particular, along with conspiracy theories and Holocaust denial. We regard as legitimate and necessary the fight against such attitudes. We also believe that the lessons of the Holocaust as well as those of other genocides of modern times must be part of the education of new generations against all forms of racial prejudice and hatred.

The fight against antisemitism must, however, be approached in a principled manner, lest it defeat its purpose. Through “examples” that it provides, the IHRA definition conflates Judaism with Zionism in assuming that all Jews are Zionists, and that the State of Israel in its current reality embodies the self-determination of all Jews. We profoundly disagree with this. The fight against antisemitism should not be turned into a stratagem to delegitimize the fight against the oppression of the Palestinians, the denial of their rights, and the continued occupation of their land. We regard the following principles as crucial in that regard.

  1. The fight against antisemitism must be deployed within the frame of international law and human rights. It should be part and parcel of the fight against all forms of racism and xenophobia, including Islamophobia, anti-Arab, and anti-Palestinian racism. The aim of this struggle is to guarantee freedom and emancipation for all oppressed groups. It is deeply distorted when geared towards the defense of an oppressive and predatory state.
  2. There is a huge difference between a condition where Jews are singled out, oppressed and suppressed as a minority by antisemitic regimes or groups, and a condition where the self-determination of a Jewish population in Palestine/Israel has been implemented in the form of an ethnic exclusivist and territorially expansionist state. As it currently exists, the State of Israel is based on uprooting the vast majority of the natives – what Palestinians and Arabs refer to as the Nakba – and on subjugating those natives who still live on the territory of historical Palestine as either second-class citizens or people under occupation, denying them their right to self-determination.
  3. The IHRA definition of antisemitism and the related legal measures adopted in several countries have been deployed mostly against leftwing and human rights groups supporting Palestinian rights and the Boycott Divestment and Sanctions (BDS) campaign, sidelining the very real threat to Jews coming from rightwing white nationalist movements in Europe and the U.S. The portrayal of the BDS campaign as antisemitic is a gross distortion of what is fundamentally a legitimate non-violent means of struggle for Palestinian rights.
  4. The IHRA definition’s statement that an example of antisemitism is “Denying the Jewish people their right to self-determination, e.g., by claiming that the existence of a State of Israel is a racist endeavor” is quite odd. It does not bother to recognize that under international law the current State of Israel has been an occupying power for over half a century, as recognized by the governments of countries where the IHRA definition is being upheld. It does not bother to consider whether this right includes the right to create a Jewish majority by way of ethnic cleansing and whether it should be balanced against the rights of the Palestinian people. Furthermore, the IHRA definition potentially discards as antisemitic all non-Zionist visions of the future of the Israeli state, such as the advocacy of a binational state or a secular democratic one that represents all its citizens equally. Genuine support for the principle of a people’s right to self-determination cannot exclude the Palestinian nation, nor any other.
  5. We believe that no right to self-determination should include the right to uproot another people and prevent it from returning to its land, or any other means of securing a demographic majority within the state. The demand by Palestinians for their right of return to the land from which they themselves, their parents and grandparents were expelled cannot be construed as antisemitic. The fact that such a demand creates anxieties among Israelis does not prove that it is unjust, nor that it is antisemitic. It is a right recognized by international law as represented in UNGA resolution 194 of 1948.
  6. To level the charge of antisemitism against anyone who regards the existing State of Israel as racist, notwithstanding the actual institutional and constitutional discrimination upon which it is based, amounts to granting Israel absolute impunity. Israel can thus deport its Palestinian citizens, or revoke their citizenship or deny them the right to vote, and still be immune from the accusation of racism. The IHRA definition and the way it has been deployed prohibit any discussion of the Israeli state as based on ethno-religious discrimination. It thus contravenes elementary justice, and basic norms of human rights and international law.
  7. We believe that justice requires full support of the Palestinians’ right to self-determination, including the demand to end the internationally acknowledged occupation of their territories and the statelessness and deprivation of Palestinian refugees. The suppression of Palestinian rights in the IHRA definition betrays an attitude upholding Jewish privilege in Palestine instead of Jewish rights, and Jewish supremacy over Palestinians instead of Jewish safety. We believe that human values and rights are indivisible and that the fight against antisemitism should go hand in hand with the struggle on behalf of all oppressed peoples and groups for dignity, equality, and emancipation.

List of Signatories (in alphabetical order):

Samir Abdallah Filmmaker, Paris, France Soleman Abu-Bader Professor and Director of Doctoral Program, Howard University, Washington, DC, USA Nadia Abu El-Haj Ann Olin Whitney Professor of Anthropology, Columbia University, USA Lila Abu-Lughod Joseph L. Buttenwieser Professor of Social Science, Columbia University, USA Bashir Abu-Manneh Reader in Postcolonial Literature, University of Kent, UK Gilbert Achcar Professor of Development Studies, SOAS, University of London, UK Nadia Leila Aissaoui Sociologist and Writer on Feminist Issues, Paris, France Mamdouh Aker Board of Trustees, Birzeit University, Palestine Samer Alatout Associate Professor, University of Wisconsin, Madison Khalil Alanani Associate Professor at the Doha Institute for Graduate Studies and Senior Fellow at Arab Center Washington DC, USA Mohammad Almasri Executive Director, Arab Center for Research and Policy Studies, Doha, Qatar Mohamed Alyahyai Writer and Novelist, Oman Suad Amiry Writer and Architect, Ramallah, Palestine Sinan Antoon Associate Professor, New York University, Iraq-US Talal Asad Emeritus Professor of Anthropology, Graduate Center, CUNY, USA Hanan Ashrawi Former Professor of Comparative Literature at Birzeit University, Palestine Aziz Al-Azmeh University Professor Emeritus, Central European University, Vienna, Austria Zeina Azzam Poet, writer and Publications Editor at Arab Center Washington DC, USA Abdullah Baabood Academic and Researcher in Gulf Studies, Oman Nadia Al-Bagdadi Professor of History, Central European University, Vienna, Austria Sam Bahour Writer, Al-Bireh/Ramallah, Palestine Zainab Bahrani Edith Porada Professor of Art History and Archaeology, Columbia University, USA Rana Barakat Assistant Professor of History, Birzeit University, Palestine Bashir Bashir Associate Professor of Political Theory, Open University of Israel, Raanana, State of Israel Taysir Batniji Artist-Painter, Gaza, Palestine and Paris, France Tahar Benjelloun Writer, Paris, France Mohammed Bennis Poet, Mohammedia, Morocco Mohammed Berrada Writer and Literary Critic, Rabat, Morocco Omar Berrada Writer and Curator, New York, USA Amahl Bishara Associate Professor and Chair, Department of Anthropology, Tufts University, USA Anouar Brahem Musician and Composer, Tunisia Salem Brahimi Filmmaker, Algeria-France Aboubakr Chraïbi Professor, Arabic Studies Department, INALCO, Paris, France Selma Dabbagh Writer, London, UK Izzat Darwazeh Professor of Communications Engineering, University College London, UK Marwan Darweish Associate Professor, Coventry University, UK Beshara Doumani Mahmoud Darwish Professor of Palestinian Studies and of History, Brown University, USA Haidar Eid Associate Professor of English Literature, Al-Aqsa University, Gaza, Palestine Ziad Elmarsafy Professor of Comparative Literature, King’s College London, UK Noura Erakat Assistant Professor, Africana Studies and Criminal Justice, Rutgers University, USA Samera Esmeir Associate Professor of Rhetoric, University of California, Berkeley, USA Khaled Fahmy FBA, Professor of Modern Arabic Studies, University of Cambridge, UK Ali Fakhrou Academic and Writer, Bahrain Randa Farah Associate Professor, Department of Anthropology, Western University, Canada Khaled Farraj Palestinian researcher Leila Farsakh Associate Professor of Political Science, University of Massachusetts Boston, USA Khaled Furani Associate Professor of Sociology & Anthropology, Tel-Aviv University, State of Israel Burhan Ghalioun Emeritus Professor of Sociology, Sorbonne 3, Paris, France Asad Ghanem Professor of Political Science, Haifa University, State of Israel Honaida Ghanim General Director of the Palestinian Forum for Israeli Studies Madar, Ramallah, Palestine George Giacaman Professor of Philosophy and Cultural Studies, Birzeit University, Palestine Rita Giacaman Professor, Institute of Community and Public Health, Birzeit University, Palestine Amel Grami Professor of Gender Studies, Tunisian University, Tunis Subhi Hadidi Literary Critic, Syria-France Ghassan Hage Professor of Anthropology and Social Theory, University of Melbourne, Australia Samira Haj Emeritus Professor of History, CSI/Graduate Center, CUNY, USA Yassin Al-Haj Saleh Writer, Syria Rema Hammami Associate Professor of Anthropology, Birzeit University, Palestine Dyala Hamzah Associate Professor of Arab History, Université de Montréal, Canada Sari Hanafi Professor of Sociology, American University of Beirut, Lebanon Adam Hanieh Reader in Development Studies, SOAS, University of London, UK Kadhim Jihad Hassan, Writer and translator, Professor at INALCO-Sorbonne, Paris, France Nadia Hijab Author and Human Rights Activist, London, UK Jamil Hilal Writer, Ramallah, Palestine Bensalim Himmich Academic, Novelist and Writer, Morocco Serene Hleihleh Cultural Activist, Jordan-Palestine Imad Harb Director of Research and Analysis at Arab Center Washington DC, USA Khaled Hroub Professor in Residence of Middle Eastern Studies, Northwestern University, Qatar Mahmoud Hussein Writer, Paris, France Lakhdar Ibrahimi Paris School of International Affairs, Institut d’Etudes Politiques, France Annemarie Jacir Filmmaker, Palestine Islah Jad Associate Professor of Political Science, Birzeit University, Palestine Khalil Jahshan Executive Director, Arab Center Washington DC, USA Lamia Joreige Visual Artist and Filmmaker, Beirut, Lebanon Amal Al-Jubouri Writer, Iraq Mudar Kassis Associate Professor of Philosophy, Birzeit University, Palestine Nabeel Kassis Former Professor of Physics and Former President, Birzeit University, Palestine Salam Kawakibi Director of Arab Center for Research and Policy Studies, Paris, France Ahmad Samih Khalidi Senior Associate Member at St. Antony’s College, Oxford Muhammad Ali Khalidi Presidential Professor of Philosophy, CUNY Graduate Center, USA Rashid Khalidi Edward Said Professor of Modern Arab Studies, Columbia University, USA Michel Khleifi Filmmaker, Palestine-Belgium Elias Khoury Writer, Beirut, Lebanon Nadim Khoury Associate Professor of International Studies, Lillehammer University College, Norway Rachid Koreichi Artist-Painter, Paris, France Jonathan Kuttab Human Rights Attorney, author and Nonresident Fellow at Arab Center Washington DC, USA Adila Laïdi-Hanieh Director General, The Palestinian Museum, Palestine Rabah Loucini Professor of History, Oran University, Algeria Mehdi Mabrouk Professor of Sociology, Ex-Minister of Culture, Director of Arab Center for Research and Policy Studies, Tunis, Tunisia Rabab El-Mahdi Associate Professor of Political Science, The American University in Cairo, Egypt Ziad Majed Associate Professor of Middle East Studies and IR, American University of Paris, France Jumana Manna Artist, Berlin, Germany Camille Mansour Researcher and author Farouk Mardam Bey Publisher, Paris, France Mai Masri Palestinian Filmmaker, Lebanon Mazen Masri Senior Lecturer in Law, City University of London, UK Dina Matar Reader in Political Communication and Arab Media, SOAS, University of London, UK Hisham Matar Writer, Professor at Barnard College, Columbia University, USA Khaled Mattawa Poet, William Wilhartz Professor of English Literature, University of Michigan, USA Yousef Munayyer Nonresident Senior Fellow at Arab Center Washington DC, USA Karma Nabulsi Professor of Politics and IR, University of Oxford, UK Hassan Nafaa Emeritus Professor of Political Science, Cairo University, Egypt Nadine Naber Professor, Dept of Gender and Women’s Studies, University of Illinois at Chicago, USA Issam Nassar Professor, Illinois State University, USA Maha Nassar Associate Professor, School of Middle Eastern and North African Studies, University of Arizona, USA Sari Nusseibeh Emeritus Professor of Philosophy, Al-Quds University, Palestine Najwa Al-Qattan Emeritus Professor of History, Loyola Marymount University, USA Omar Al-Qattan Filmmaker, Chair of The Palestinian Museum and the A.M. Qattan Foundation, UK Nadim N. Rouhana Professor of International Affairs, The Fletcher School, Tufts University, USA Ahmad Sa’adi Professor, Haifa, State of Israel Haider Saeed Research and Head of Research Department, Arab Center for Research and Policy Studies, Doha, Qatar Rasha Salti Independent Curator, Writer, Researcher of Art and Film, Germany-Lebanon Elias Sanbar Writer, Paris, France Farès Sassine Professor of Philosophy and Literary Critic, Beirut, Lebanon Sherene Seikaly Associate Professor of History, University of California, Santa Barbara, USA Samah Selim Associate Professor, A, ME & SA Languages & Literatures, Rutgers University, USA Leila Shahid Writer, Beirut, Lebanon Nadera Shalhoub-Kevorkian Lawrence D Biele Chair in Law, Hebrew University, State of Israel Anton Shammas Professor of Comparative Literature, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, USA Yara Sharif Senior Lecturer, Architecture and Cities, University of Westminster, UK Hanan Al-Shaykh Writer, London, UK Raja Shehadeh Lawyer and Writer, Ramallah, Palestine Gilbert Sinoué Writer, Paris, France Ahdaf Soueif Writer, Egypt-UK Mayssoun Sukarieh Senior Lecturer in Development Studies, King’s College London, UK Elia Suleiman Filmmaker, Palestine-France Nimer Sultany Reader in Public Law, SOAS, University of London, UK Jad Tabet Architect and writer, Beirut, Lebanon Jihan El-Tahri Filmmaker, Egypt Salim Tamari Emeritus Professor of Sociology, Birzeit University, Palestine Wassyla Tamzali Writer, Contemporary Art Producer, Algeria Fawwaz Traboulsi Writer, Beirut Lebanon Dominique Vidal Historian and Journalist, Palestine-France Haytham El-Wardany Writer, Egypt-Germany Said Zeedani Emeritus Associate Professor of Philosophy, Al-Quds University, Palestine Rafeef Ziadah Lecturer in Comparative Politics of the Middle East, SOAS, University of London, UK Khaled Ziade Author, historian, former diplomat and Director of Arab Center for Research and Policy Studies, Beirut, Lebanon Radwan Ziadeh Syrian Activist and Senior Fellow at Arab Center Washington DC, USA Raef Zreik Minerva Humanities Centre, Tel-Aviv University, State of Israel Elia Zureik Professor Emeritus, Queen’s University, Canada

A preliminary version of this list was published by The Guardian here.

This statement can also be found on the Arab Center for Research and Policy Studies’ website here.

==============================================================

https://www.pij.org/articles/1962/the-holocaust-and-the-nakba-memory-national-identity-and-jewisharabpartnership

The Holocaust and the Nakba: Memory, National Identity and Jewish-Arab Partnership
By Alon Confino

Vol. 24 No. 3   2019

By Alon Confino
Professor Alon Confino is Director of the Institute for Holocaust, Genocide, and Memory Studies at University of Massachusetts, Amherst.

The link between the Holocaust and the Nakba is probably the most charged for both Jews and Palestinians. To Jews, the Holocaust is a foundational past, and some would say a unique one, and thus to discuss it in conjunction with any other event may appear to banalize the extermination of the Jews and even to present a moral and political threat. To Palestinians, the Nakba is a foundational past, and since the Jews invoke the Holocaust to justify Zionism and Israel’s actions, to many Palestinians recognition of the Holocaust is tantamount to legitimizing the injustices of the Nakba and the iniquities that Israel continues to wreak upon them. To Germans as well, the juxtaposition of these two events is a sensitive matter, since they feel particularly responsible for the memory of the Holocaust.

The book “The Holocaust and Nakba: Memory, National Identity and Jewish-Arab Partnership,” edited by Bashir Bashir and Amos Goldberg, published by The Van Leer Jerusalem Institute and Hakibbutz Hameuchad Publishing House in 2015 which evolved out of a conference that was held at the Van Leer Institute in Jerusalem held in 2008, seeks to explore the link between these two events. It contains 14 articles written by Palestinian and Jewish scholars, writers, and literati, all of them citizens of Israel. This is an important book since it does not seek to persuade the reader to adopt a particular position, but presents a variety of opinions on the topic, including articles that cast doubt on the project or reject it altogether. Particularly worthy of note is the excellent introduction, with its restrained tone and its sensitivity to history and memory.

No Comparison between the Holocaust and the Nakba

What, then, does this book argue? Let us begin by what it does not do – Bashir and Goldberg do not draw comparisons between the Holocaust and the Nakba: “These are very different events that cannot be compared as far as the scope of violence and murder committed during their course are concerned […] the intention [of this book] is not to blur the tremendous differences between them.” They do invite discussion on two levels. The first addresses the memory of the Holocaust and the Nakba as traumatic events.
They are both foundational pasts that constitute an ethical and historical turning point for each people. The editors propose to bundle together the memories of these two events in order to generate “empathic unsettlement” on the part of each side toward the other. This shared empathy does not imply immediate recognition of the other’s truths or the erasure of one’s own identity, nor does it necessarily and immediately lead to practical results. It does, however, propose an alternative to the self-contained, zerosum narrative of history and memory, and to the rejection of the other and their suffering. It requires the Palestinian people “to recognize that which is most inconceivable to it – the legitimacy of the Jewish-Israeli identity that evolved in the Land of Israel / Palestine,” and requires the Jews “to recognize the catastrophe that they brought upon the Palestinians.”

The second discussion concerns our historical understanding of the two events. Bashir and Goldberg maintain that “given the potential for radical violence found in ethnic nationalism and in the modern nation-state […] both the Holocaust and the Nakba are characterized by a purifying national violence.” Relying on extensive scholarly literature, they assert that two major characteristics of the nation-state are the desire to associate citizenship with ethnic-national ascription, and the aspiration toward homogenization of society. The Jews of Europe suffered from this urge toward national homogenization. While this in itself fails to explain the Holocaust, once the Jews were marked as another that did not belong, they immediately became an object of discrimination, and frequently suffered expulsion or murder.

“This type of nationalism,” note Bashir and Goldberg, “constantly engages in defining the ethnic identity of the nation-state and its efforts at ethnic homogenization.” In this respect, the new Jewish nationalism in Palestine regarded the Palestinians as a threat to Jewish sovereignty and an ethnic other (although there were of course other imaginations of the relations between Jews and Arabs). Once the Palestinians were marked as such, they were driven out during the 1948 war on behalf of the creation of a homogenous Jewish nation-state. Bashir and Goldberg emphasize here once again that the Holocaust and the Nakba were events of a different
magnitude and of a completely different historical character, and cannot be compared. Yet they are also events that “in certain senses share the same type of political logic.”

This methodological framework contributes to our understanding of the events’ memory and history without divesting them of their particularity. Bashir and Goldberg do not seek to show that the two events are identical, but rather endeavor to understand them within a broader panoply of traumatic pasts and homogenous nation-states. This approach does not detract from the particularity of either event, on the contrary. Take the Holocaust for example. This approach is compatible with insightful approaches to the study
of the Holocaust, which comprehend the extermination of the Jews within the broad context of modern comparative genocide. This scholarly approach examines the similarities as well as the differences between the Holocaust and other instances of genocide. The notion of exterminating racial groups thus appeared some hundred years prior to the Third Reich. And yet, the persecution and annihilation of the Jews was clearly pursued with greater urgency by the Nazis and was of greater historical significance than other
acts of genocide that they perpetrated. It is precisely this approach that underscores the particularity of the Holocaust within its historical context. Similarly, the particularity of the Holocaust and of the Nakba is in no way compromised when one thinks about the two events in tandem. In terms of historical method and interpretation, it is appropriate to discuss these two events together, as well as other events which exist on a spectrum of modern mass violence. The aversion on the part of Jews and Palestinians to do so stems from concerns over the identity and political implications of such a move.

Why are the two linked together?

And still, we are entitled to ask, why should we link these events? Is this book perhaps merely the outcome of a transitory fashionable moment at which the Nakba became a catchword within Israeli culture, or is the debate on the relations between the Holocaust and the Nakba rooted in a longer tradition? Our historical imagination connects at times very different events because by joining them they tell us something important about who we are, where we came from, how we got here, and where we are going. This, to my mind, is true of the linkage between the Holocaust and the Nakba in Israeli culture from 1948 to the present. In his tale “Hirbet Hizah,” which appeared in 1949 when the echoes of battle had hardly subsided, S. Yizhar depicted the expelled Palestinians as “a frightened and compliant and silent and groaning flock,” alluding to the metaphor that served to describe the Jews who, during the Holocaust, were led as “a flock to slaughter.” Shortly thereafter, in 1952, Avot Yeshurun’s jolting poem “Passover on Caves”
appeared in Ha’aretz newspaper. He subsequently described it in the following words: “The Holocaust of European Jewry and the Holocaust of Palestinian Arabs, a single Holocaust of the Jewish People. The two gaze directly into one another’s face.” Closer to our time, in his film “Waltz With Bashir” Ari Fulman placed the Palestinian refugees alongside the victims of the Holocaust. And the list can go on and on.

The linkage between the two events in society, literature, and politics has created a cultural tradition with its own language and images that enables Israelis to think about the two events separately and in tandem. This tradition is shared by those who connect the events and those who utterly reject this connection. For the mention of the two events in the same breath has always aroused fierce opposition and profound resentment. And yet this opposition is part of the cultural tradition that by connecting the events confront their memory and give them meaning.

Insights to be gained

The significance of the link between the two events has altered over the years with the transformations undergone by Israeli society. What insights can we gain from the book’s “Introduction” with regard to the connection between the Holocaust and the Nakba these days? While the Holocaust is a foundational event in modern history, it nevertheless, as a historical event, lies in the past. Of course, Holocaust victims bear the trauma throughout their life, but the Jews as a collectivity live in a completely different historical and political time, both by virtue of the existence of the state of Israel and because Germans and Jews harbor no political or territorial claims on each other. The enduring struggle is that over memory. One remembers the Holocaust with such intensity precisely because it has passed from the domain of history into the domain of memory.

Yet while the Holocaust has become part of history, not so the Nakba, which is in some way a continuous present. Its outcome impacts almost every Palestinian wherever he or she may be, and the Palestinians’ ongoing collective weakness is linked to the uprooting of the texture of their life in 1948. Although the Nakba – the uprooting of the Palestinians in the 1948 war – was an event specific in time and place, its results – the deprivation of the Palestinians’ national rights – continue to this day. The fact that the

Holocaust belongs to the past and the Nakba to the present explains why Jews and Germans find it easier to be reconciled with regard to the memory of the Holocaust than it is for Jews and Palestinians to be reconciled with regard to the memory of the Nakba.

A Dual Asymmetry

A further point should be noted. Jews are right to assert that one cannot compare the genocide committed during the Holocaust to the Nakba. But there is another aspect of asymmetry between the two events, and Jews should do well to take note thereof: the Palestinians are in no way responsible for the Holocaust of European Jewry, whereas Israel is closely linked to the Nakba. Israel had a hand in the expulsion of the Palestinians, in the confiscation of their property, and in obstructing the return of the refugees. The question here is not who is right and who is wrong. Whether one accepts Israel’s justifications of what occurred in 1948 and continues to occur to this day or not, the state of Israel is not a neutral party with regard to the suffering of the Palestinians, in contrast to the Palestinians who had no role in the Holocaust. There is no symmetry, write correctly Bashir and Goldberg: “there is a conqueror and there are the conquered; there is a sovereign and there are subjects; there are those who drove others out and there are those who were dispossessed; there is a people that established its homeland and that caused another people to lose its homeland.” In this sense it is not sufficient for Israeli Jews to recognize the Palestinian trauma only at the level of memory; a change must come about also at the political level.

The problem of both Holocaust and Nakba Denial

Several of the articles in the book object to discuss the Holocaust and the Nakba in the same breath. Palestinian resistance to this linkage has nothing to do with Holocaust denial. Salman Natour writes of “the incomparability of the Holocaust and the Nakba” because using the Holocaust “to legitimize the occupation of Palestine and the expulsion of the Palestinian people is an immoral act.” From a Zionist perspective, Elhanan Yakira denounces the project altogether because using “the word ‘Nakba’ as if it were equivalent to the word ‘Holocaust,’ or as if the events that these two words denote belong to the same family of historical events, is completely unfounded.” I do not accept his position, but this is a legitimate opinion. Yet Yakira proceeds to claim that “what they now call the catastrophe is nothing but their defeat in war […] it is not even altogether clear who sought to drive them out and to what extent.” These are notions that derive from the Jews’ collective memory of what they wish to believe to have happened in 1948, not from the history of what actually happened during the war. The Nakba is the expulsion and uprooting of the Palestinians in the war of 1948, the confiscation of their property, and the prevention of their return; it is linked to the war, but its meaning cannot be confined to the war itself. In this sense it resembles the Holocaust. The annihilation of the Jews between 1941 and 1945 was a part of the Nazi war in Europe, but its significance cannot be restricted to the war itself. As far as the 1948 expulsion goes, scholarly studies have made it quite clear who drove out whom and to what extent.
Precisely because the Holocaust and the Nakba are foundational events, it is essential to study their history. The purpose of the national narratives of both peoples is to explain and to justify their identity in the present, and less to become familiar with and to understand the complexity of past events. We must therefore be prepared to learn the past and face it unflinchingly. This requires willingness on the part of the Palestinians to learn about the Holocaust. If one adheres to the assumption that the Zionists were no more than European settler colonialists, as many Palestinians believe, one fails to understand that Zionism was also a movement of national liberation that grew out of the persecution of the Jews in Europe prior to the Holocaust. And it requires willingness on the part of the Jews to learn about the Nakba. One of the explanations for the uprooting of the Palestinians, which appeared immediately after the 1948 war and over the years became a part of the Israeli narrative, is that the Palestinians’ leaders ordered them to leave in order to facilitate the Arabs’ military campaigns, and assured them that they would return to their homes in the wake of the armies’ victory. This is a fable; even Zionist historians no longer believe it.

As a scholar of Germany and the Holocaust, as well as of 1948 in Palestine, I find it helpful to think in association about Holocaust and Nakba memory in order to learn and apply useful methods and approaches. The term “Holocaust” came to stand for the extermination of the Jews in Europe only in the late 1950s and the beginning of 1960s, although references to “Shoah” were already made during the Second World War. The term Nakba was coined to represent the dispossession of the Palestinians by the historian
Constantine Zurayk in his small, influential book “The Meaning of Disaster” written in mid-1948. But the term did not catch on among Israeli Jews, and, as far as I could attest, was not used regularly in public space by Palestinians citizens of Israel until the 1990s. In both historical cases the term that came to stand for the event was attached to it years after it actually happened. Also of interest is that while the Holocaust and the Nakba are foundational pasts that elicit strong emotional response, the history of denying they ever
happened is part of the history of their memory. Finally, Israeli Jews can look at how Germans remembered the Holocaust–at the road they traveled from years of denial and half-hearted recognition to assuming historical responsibility–and draw important lessons for the way they should assume historical responsibility for aspects of their 1948 past.

We can think about the Nakba by telling a story of 1948 that does not seek to lay blame, score points, and divide the world into clear-cut perpetrators and victims, but that recognizes the complexity of human affairs and accepts that perpetrator and victim may coexist in the same person. Since the topic is so charged, it is insightful to begin understanding it from a broader historical perspective. Something happened in Palestine in 1948. 750,000 Palestinians were uprooted. They did not just leave of their own accord. What happened in Palestine in 1948 was part of a history of forced migrations whereby nation-states sought to create homogenous
populations by violently removing thousands and even millions of people. The 1940s were a key decade in this respect that witnessed forced migrations in Europe, in India/Pakistan, and in Palestine/Israel. In Europe, among others, eleven million Germans were uprooted from Poland, Czechoslovakia, and Hungary in a wave that began in 1944 as millions fled the advancing Red Army. In India, in 1947–1948, twelve million people were expelled from their homes in the new India and in the two parts of the new Pakistan.
Thousands of Hindis in Lahore and Muslims in Delhi left before the mass expulsions began for fear of their safety. Millions were driven out thereafter.

Two Possible Conclusions

Jews can draw two conclusions from their role in the forced migration of the Palestinians. They can emit a sigh of relief, “Well, everyone expelled people in the 1940s, that’s life, what can we do about it, let us be.” And some may even add, “it’s a pity we didn’t finish the job.” Of course, such an arrogant and disparaging attitude is inconceivable when discussing the atrocities visited upon the Jews in the 1940s, including the Holocaust. A second conclusion would be to view Zionism in general and 1948 in particular from a wider perspective; not as a unique story, but as a story of human beings acting within specific historical time, place, and circumstances. From this perspective, forced migrations took place in various locations during the first half of the twentieth century, and in particular during the 1940s. They had general causes, while they were acted out in specific historical contexts. But they did happen; they constitute a human tragedy that has to be acknowledged by those who are fully or partly responsible for them.

1948 is the year of the Nakba and is also the year in which the Jews founded a state of their own, with its own language, culture and vitality. The Nakba and Israel’s independence also “gaze directly into one another’s face.” Just as one cannot understand the rich history of the United States only through the prism of the genocide of the Native-Americans, so one cannot understand the rich history of the state of Israel only through the expulsion of the Palestinians. Yet it behooves the Jews to recognize the role played by their people in the Nakba, for a very simple reason. The Nakba is part of their history, and an important part: they remember the Nakba whether they deny it or relate it in prose or in poetry. The very attempt to erase the memory of the Nakba is the outcome of an immense mobilization of political, economic, and cultural effort. The erasure of memory is the outcome of an extraordinarily lively awareness. The Jews are condemned, in some sense, to remember and remember and remember the Palestinians who lost their homes and their homeland, and to tell this story in various ways because it is inextricably bound up with the way in which they themselves won their homes and their homeland. And this is one of the reasons that the defining past events of both peoples have continued to eye each other ever since 1948.

Why is this book important? Its power lies not in a quest for agreement or in an attempt to persuade, but in the act of Jews and Palestinians speaking, writing, and reading together about the Holocaust and the Nakba; this is the real event and the significant effort. This act in itself generates a jolt, without which there is no prospect of national rights and human rights for all the inhabitants of the land.

Alon Confino, review of the book: Bashir, Bashir; Goldberg, Amos (eds): The Holocaust and the Nakba. Memory, National Identity and Jewish-Arab Partnership. Jerusalem 2015. ISBN – was originally published in: H-Soz-Kult, 22.04.2016, <www.hsozkult. de/publicationreview/id/reb-24083>. [Alexander Korb]

Bashing Israel at the Harvard Divinity School Program

24.02.22

Editorial Note

The Harvard Divinity School program of Religion and Public Life is running events presenting Israel in a negative light.

The Religion and Public Life initiative was established in 2019. It integrates a number of existing Harvard Divinity School programs along with seminars, conferences, and other activities initiated by faculty, intending to “strengthen the public understanding of religion across multiple sectors, toward a more creative, just, and peaceful future.”

Instead of focusing on peace, they trash Israel. This is not surprising because Palestinian American Hilary Rantisi is the associate director. 

The radical Israeli academic activist is Atalia Omer, a senior fellow. She was interviewed in 2019 in an article by The Nation on BDS and anti-Zionist activism, where she discussed her book Days of Awe: Reimagining Jewishness in Solidarity With Palestinians. She revealed that “the radical synagogue I attend, Tzedek Chicago, invited Omar Barghouti, the cofounder of the BDS movement.”

The examples of their Israel bashing are numerous. For instance, a recent project, “Disrupting Injustice and Promoting Moral Imagination in Israel/Palestine” talked about “illuminating transnational solidarities, reimagining Jewish identity, Palestinian steadfastness (Sumoud), and cultivating moral imagination and creative possibilities for a just peace in Israel/Palestine.” In another event that took place recently, titled “Shared Resistance and Solidarity: A (Re)Newed Paradigm,” Oriel Eisner was in a conversation about “engaging in immersive solidarity work and shared resistance in the last year as a part of a renewal of efforts in joint struggle against the Occupation.”

In another event, “The Decolonizing Rubric: Modernity, Religion, and Re-imagining Palestine/Israel,” three scholars participated: Dr. Bashir Bashir, from the Israeli Open University, the co-editor of The Holocaust and the Nakba: A New Grammar of Trauma and History, in 2018 whose also authored The Arab and Jewish Questions: Geographies of Entanglement in Palestine and Beyond (2020); Dr. Mahmood Mamdani, Columbia University, who discussed his most recent book, Neither Settler nor Native: The Making and Unmaking of Permanent Minorities, in 2020. Mamdani argued that “the nation state was born of colonialism, urging us to rethink political violence and re-imagine political community beyond majorities and minorities”; Dr. Areej Sabbagh-Khoury of the Hebrew University of Jerusalem discussed her forthcoming book, which “examines encounters between kibbutz settlers and Palestinian inhabitants in northern Palestine’s Jezreel Valley before, during, and after 1948. Drawing on resources uncovered in the settler colonial archives.” It demonstrates the “coloniality of socialist Zionist settlers’ practices of purchase, expropriation, and accumulation by dispossession.”

In April, a discussion will take place on “Decolonize Now: A Conversation about Radical Love and Justice in Palestine/Israel”.  The speaker is Noura Erakat, from Rutgers University, whose anti-Israeli views are well known: “Since the signing of Oslo, or the Declaration of Principles, in 1993, the question of Palestine has been rammed into the constricting paradigms of statehood and diplomatic negotiations. The peace process framework not only eschewed the consequential dimension of power from the question of Palestine but limited its possible futures by reducing it to a matter of, at best, equitable partitions. This conversation aims to peel back those debilitating frameworks to consider how other approaches like anti-racism, feminism, and anti-imperialism can help overcome restrictive binaries and lead to decolonial futures.”

Also, in April, “Walking Through the Twilight: A Visual Exploration of Contemporary Jewish Anti-Occupation Activism.” The panel would feature “a photographic exploration of American Jewish activism in solidarity with Palestinians against the Israeli military occupation.”

Later in April, the program will feature “Expressions of Sumoud in Palestinian Higher Education,” questioning “What is the role of Palestinian universities in the struggle for freedom and justice?” Rana Khoury “shares her exploration of developing a dedicated curriculum and the experience of Dar Al-Kalima University in shaping Palestinian students as cultural activists.”

Last but not least, the event, “Yom Ha’atzmaut and the Colonization of American Judaism.” Rabbi Brant Rosen of Tzedek Chicago and Daniel Boyarin of the University of California, Berkeley, will converse on the “ways that Zionist hegemony is expressed through the Yom Ha’atzmaut (Israeli Independence Day) that has become a staple on the American Jewish holiday calendar, projecting themes of militarism, colonialism, and empire on to sacred religious tradition.” 

As can be seen, the sessions are all exercises in bashing Israel, featuring some of the more radical anti-Israel voices. More to the point, there is nothing in the Harvard program concerning the many issues the Palestinians have faced.  For instance, there is a real possibility that Hamas and the Palestinian Islamic Jihad, under the guidance of the Quds Force, the foreign division of the Iranian Islamic Revolutionary Guards, would try to take over the West Bank. Fearing such an outcome, the Palestinian Authority canceled last year the democratic elections.

The organizers of the Harvard Divinity School program would be well advised to read the article of Daniel Levin, “Iran, Hamas and Palestinian Islamic Jihad,” published by The United States Institute of Peace, in 2018, updated in May 2021.  Levin discusses the real issues the Palestinian society faces today, not the convoluted presentations in which Israelis can do no right and the Palestinians can do no wrong.

References:

https://rpl.hds.harvard.edu/news/religion-conflict-and-peace-initiative-fellows-spring-series
Religion and Public Life – Harvard Divinity School | Harvard University

Disrupting Injustice and Promoting Moral Imagination in Israel/Palestine

January 31, 2022

Conflict and Peace Fellows at Religion and Public Life (RPL) talk about their projects illuminating transnational solidarities, reimagining Jewish identity, Palestinian steadfastness (Sumoud), and cultivating moral imagination and creative possibilities for a just peace in Israel/Palestine.

Shared Resistance and Solidarity: A (Re)Newed Paradigm
Tuesday, February 15 | 12–1:00pm EST | Zoom
REGISTER FOR FEBRUARY 15
Oriel Eisner, Topol Fellow at RCPI, and on-the-ground organizer with the Center for Jewish Nonviolence
In conversation with Neomi-Nur Zahor, Activist and Arabic teacher, and Basil al-Adraa, Activist and Journalist
RCPI Fellow Oriel Eisner in conversation with a Palestinian and an Israeli activist—talking about their experience engaging in immersive solidarity work and shared resistance in the last year as a part of a renewal of efforts in joint struggle against the Occupation.
Moderator: Hilary Rantisi, Associate Director, Religion, Conflict and Peace Initiative, HDS

Breaking Walls: Historical and Contemporary Mizrahi Feminist Struggles for Housing in Israel/Palestine
Tuesday, March 1 | 12–1:00pm EST | Zoom
REGISTER FOR MARCH 1
Sapir Sluzker-Amran, RCPI Fellow; Human Rights Lawyer and Co-founder of Breaking Walls Feminist Grassroots Movement
In conversation with Yali Hashash, Head of Gender and Criminology Department, Or Yehuda College
Sapir Sluzker Amran along with Yali Hashash will explore the role of powerful civic grassroots movements in Israel/Palestine that center feminist-queer-class-race intersectionality and solidarity while challenging secular liberal thinking about feminist leadership. They will discuss the role of alternative and community archives by showcasing feminist activism from the 1950’s onwards and highlighting Mizrahi feminist struggles for housing in Israel/Palestine.
Moderator: Lihi Yona, JSD candidate at Columbia Law School focusing on employment law and race theory in Israel and the United States.

The Troubled Everyday in/of Gaza: Restoring Agency and Creative Possibility
Tuesday, March 8  | 12–1:00pm EST | Zoom
REGISTER FOR MARCH 8
Salem Al-Qudwa, RCPI Fellow and Architect
In conversation with Sara Roy, Senior Research Scholar at the Center for Middle Eastern Studies at Harvard University
Salem Al-Qudwa will showcase his work focusing on community and people with an emphasis on ethics, social injustice, and architecture in conflict zones such as the Gaza Strip. He will also introduce his work on gender and in-between spaces exploring barriers, exploitation, and the relationship of widowed women to space and architecture.
Co-sponsored by The Middle East Forum at the Center for Middle Eastern Studies at Harvard

To Eat Alone Is To Die Alone: A Voyage into the Lives of Seeds and their Communities
Tuesday, March 22 | 12–1:00pm EST | Zoom
REGISTER FOR MARCH 22
Vivien Sansour, RCPI Fellow; Founder of Palestine Heirloom Seed Library
In conversation with Riad Bahhur, Professor of History and Global Studies at Sacramento City College
Vivien Sansour will be sharing excerpts of her upcoming autobiographical book weaving a poetic narration of people, plants, and other food stories from Palestine to South America, taking us on her journey of establishing the Palestine Heirloom Seed Library and the projects that resulted from it. Professor Bahhur will explore with Vivien how stories inform our political and social realities on a global level and how they can be catalysts for a new conversation about indigenous knowledge and spirituality.

A Home for the Human Spirit: Cultural Activism and the Moral Imagination in the Inherit Art Project
Tuesday, March 29 | 12–1:00pm EST | Zoom
REGISTER FOR MARCH 29
Taurean J. Webb, RCPI Fellow; Instructor of Religion and Race at Garrett-Evangelical Theological Seminary
In conversation with Brian Bantum, Professor of Theology at Garrett-Evangelical Theological Seminary, and Lux Eterna, Australian-born Palestinian artist featured in exhibition
This presentation chronicles the evolution of the collaborative art exhibition, Ye Shall Inherit the Earth & Faces of the Divine. The exhibition featuring works of artists from the African Diasporic and Palestinian exilic communities, attempts to gesture towards some commentary about both the universality and specificity of conversations ranging from human rights, human dignity, and artistic production-as-a practice of resistance. Follow the Inherit exhibition on Instagram @inherit_exhibit22.

Decolonize Now: A Conversation about Radical Love and Justice in Palestine/Israel
*Wednesday, April 6 | 1–2:00pm EST | Zoom*
REGISTER FOR APRIL 6
Noura Erakat, RCPI Fellow; Associate Professor at Rutgers University, Department of Africana Studies
In conversation with Marshall Ganz, Rita E. Hauser Senior Lecturer in Leadership, Organizing, and Civil Society at Harvard Kennedy School
Since the signing of Oslo, or the Declaration of Principles, in 1993, the question of Palestine has been rammed into the constricting paradigms of statehood and diplomatic negotiations. The peace process framework not only eschewed the consequential dimension of power from the question of Palestine but limited its possible futures by reducing it to a matter of, at best, equitable partitions. This conversation aims to peel back those debilitating frameworks to consider how other approaches like anti-racism, feminism, and anti-imperialism can help overcome restrictive binaries and lead to decolonial futures.
*Please note that this event falls on a Wednesday at 1pm EST.

Walking Through the Twilight: A Visual Exploration of Contemporary Jewish Anti-Occupation Activism
Tuesday, April 12 | 12–1:00pm EST | Zoom
REGISTER FOR APRIL 12
Mati Milstein, RCPI Fellow; American Jewish photojournalist and documentary photographer
In conversation with Awdah Al-Hathaleen, Activist, Oriel Eisner, Activist, and Emily Glick, Activist
Walking Through the Twilight is a photographic exploration of American Jewish activism in solidarity with Palestinians against the Israeli military occupation. The project explores the interplay between Jewish religious identity and activism, discussing issues of identity, faith, and action.
Moderator: Atalia Omer, Professor of Religion, Conflict, and Peace Studies at the Kroc Institute for International Peace Studies at University of Notre Dame and T. J. Dermot Dunphy Visiting Professor of Religion, Violence, and Peacebuilding and Senior Fellow in Conflict and Peace at Harvard Divinity School

“Sumoud” by Varvara Abd al-Razeq, Dar Al-Kalima University
Expressions of Sumoud in Palestinian Higher Education
Tuesday, April 19 | 12–1:00pm EST | Zoom
REGISTER FOR APRIL 19
Rana Khoury, RCPI Fellow; Vice President for Development at Dar Al-Kalima University
In conversation with Hilary Rantisi, Associate Director, Religion, Conflict and Peace Initiative, Harvard Divinity School
What is the role of Palestinian universities in the struggle for freedom and justice? Rana shares her exploration of developing a dedicated curriculum and the experience of Dar Al-Kalima University in shaping Palestinian students as cultural activists.

Yom Ha’atzmaut and the Colonization of American Judaism
Tuesday, April 26 | 12–1:00pm EST | Zoom
REGISTER FOR APRIL 26
Brant Rosen, Topol Fellow at RCPI; Rabbi, Tzedek Chicago
In conversation with Daniel Boyarin, Hermann P. and Sophia Taubman Professor of Talmudic Culture in the Departments of Near Eastern Studies and Rhetoric at the University of California, Berkeley
In conversation with Daniel Boyarin, Rabbi Brant Rosen interrogates the ways that Zionist hegemony is expressed through the Yom Ha’atzmaut (Israeli Independence Day) that has become a staple on the American Jewish holiday calendar, projecting themes of militarism, colonialism, and empire on to sacred religious tradition. He will also present an alternative framing of this day as a religious observance – one that expresses remembrance, repentance, and reparations.
Moderator: Atalia Omer, Professor of Religion, Conflict, and Peace Studies at the Kroc Institute for International Peace Studies at University of Notre Dame and T. J. Dermot Dunphy Visiting Professor of Religion, Violence, and Peacebuilding and Senior Fellow in Conflict and Peace at Harvard Divinity School

==============================================

https://rpl.hds.harvard.edu/news/2021/11/09/video-the-decolonizing-rubric-modernity-religion-and-reimagining-palestine-israel

Video: The Decolonizing Rubric: Modernity, Religion and Re-imagining Palestine/Israel

November 9, 2021

No longer do scholarly accounts of Palestine/Israel presume the “two-state solution” as a tangible political principle, if they are realists, or accountable for historical injustice and imagining of alternative futures, if they are concerned with justice, not only peace. This panel featured a conversation among authors of recent scholarly works that grapple with the changing paradigm of analysis with decolonial sensitivities. The panelists discussed the ethical limits of a paradigm based on ethnoreligious and national segregationist logic and illuminated where religion might fit (or not) in alternative political paradigms that undo exclusionary nationalist ideological frames.

This event took place on November 9, 2021.

AUDIO TRANSCRIPT:

SPEAKER 1: Harvard Divinity School.

SPEAKER 2: The Decolonizing Rubric: Modernity, Religion, and Re-imagining Palestine/Israel, November 9th 2021.

HILARY RANTISI: Hello, everyone, and welcome to today’s Religion, Conflict, and Peace Initiative webinar, The Decolonizing Rubric: Modernity, Religion, and Re-imagining Palestine/Israel. My name is Hilary Rantisi, and I am the Associate Director of the Religion, Conflict, and Peace Initiative, a program of Religion and Public Life at Harvard Divinity School. Our work at the Religion, Conflict, and Peace Initiative centralizes an analysis of structural injustice, violence, and power, and examines how more capacious understanding of religion can yield fresh insights into contemporary challenges and opportunities for just peacebuilding.

The primary case study we’re focusing on is on Israel/Palestine. Our aim is to stretch the scholarly discourse around religion and the practices of peacebuilding and examine the decolonial potentialities of art, religion, and identity transformation. Our fall series has focused on the themes of religious terminologies and secular nationalism and political violence, and on decolonial sites of practice and theory in Israel/Palestine, and political emancipatory theologies from a comparative perspective. Today’s event addresses decolonial sensitivities and gives us a space for reimagination.

I’ll now hand off to my colleague Atalia Omer, who will introduce herself and our panelists. Atalia?

ATALIA OMER: Thank you, Hilary. So greetings, everyone. My name is Atalia Omer. I’m a Professor of Religion, Conflict, and Peace Studies at the Kroc Institute for International Peace Studies and the Keough School of Global Affairs, both at the University of Notre Dame in the United States. And I’m also, and it is in this capacity that I’m here today, I’m also the [INAUDIBLE] visiting professor in religion, violence, and peacebuilding at Harvard Divinity School’s Religion and Public Life program, which is kind of the umbrella framework of the Religion, Conflict, and Peace Initiative, which hosts and sponsors this event today.

OK, so our starting point for this panel today is that no longer do scholarly and activist accounts of Palestine/Israel presume the, quote, “two-state solution” as a tangible political principle, if they are [? realized ?] or accountable for historical injustice and imagining of alternative futures, if they are concerned with justice not only peace. This panel features a conversation among established and emerging authors of recent scholarly works that grapple with the changing paradigm of analysis with the colonial and anti-colonial sensitivities. The panelists will discuss the ethical limits of a modernist paradigm, based on ethnoreligious and national, majoritarian, segregationist logic, and will illuminate where religion might fit or not in alternative political paradigms that undo exclusionary, nationalist, ideological frames.

I’m now going to introduce the speakers extremely briefly in alphabetical order. So first, Dr. Bashir Bashir is an Associate Professor in the Department of Sociology, Political Science and Communication at the Open University of Israel. He’s also a senior research fellow at the Van Leer Jerusalem Institute. Among other numerous publications, he is the co-editor of The Holocaust and the Nakba: A New Grammar of Trauma and History, which came out with Columbia University Press in 2018. And the second book, a recent book, is The Arab and Jewish Questions: Geographies of Entanglement in Palestine and Beyond, also with Columbia University Press in 2020.

Next, Dr. Mahmood Mamdani is the Herbert Lerman Professor of Government and Professor of Anthropology at Columbia University. IN his most recent book, Neither Settler nor Native: The Making and Unmaking of Permanent Minorities that was published in 2020 with Harvard University Press, Mamdani draws valuable lessons from the history of the United States, Sudan, Palestine/Israel, Nuremberg, and South Africa, and argues that the nation state was born of colonialism, urging us to rethink political violence and re-imagine political community beyond majorities and minorities.

Next, Dr. Areej Sabbagh-Khoury is an Assistant Professor of Sociology and Anthropology at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem. Her research interests lie in political and historical sociologies, colonialism, indigenous studies, and critical social theory. Her forthcoming book with Stanford University Press examines encounters between kibbutz settlers and Palestinian inhabitants in northern Palestine’s Jezreel Valley before, during, and after 1948. Drawing on resources uncovered in the settler colonial archives, it demonstrates the coloniality of socialist Zionist settlers’ practices of purchase, expropriation, and accumulation by dispossession. She shows in the book, in the forthcoming book, how their representation of the past facilitated disavowal of the indigenous right to sovereignty. Sabbagh-Khoury received her PhD from Tel Aviv University and has held postdoctoral appointments at Columbia, New York, Brown, and Tufts University. She’s a member of the board of Mada al-Carmel Arab Center of Applied Social Studies and its academic research committee.

The format for the event is conversational. I encourage the audience to submit your questions via the Q&A function in your Zoom screen. At this point– I see that all the panelists already turned on their cameras, so that’s wonderful. So let me go ahead and just proceed with the first question to Professor Mamdani. So in your book, Neither Settler nor Native, which I just alluded to, you write toward the end of your Palestine/Israel chapter, and I quote, “De-Zionization would involve the de-politicization of Jewish and Palestinian identity so that Israel may be a rights-protecting democracy, rather than the servant of a permanent national majority”– end of quote. This is from page 55.

Would you please unpack and contextualize this statement, paying, perhaps, particular attention to your analysis of what Jews, Judaism, and Judaization, or Zionization, have to do with this case of settler colonialism? Also, if you could bring into your analysis or discussion just now the case of the [INAUDIBLE], perhaps also the Ethiopians and their, quote-unquote, “Judaization,” that would be greatly appreciated, as I’m aware that many people in the audience may be especially attuned to this issue. Thank you.

MAHMOOD MAMDANI: Thank you, Atalia. Great question. Let me just begin by saying that and Jews and Judaism have no necessary relationship to settler colonialism. The Jewish population of mandate Palestine belong to three different groups. There were those who had never left Palestine. I consider these among the natives of Palestine.

Then there were those who returned to the Holy Land on a pilgrimage, seeking a religious homeland. They were content to be part of the existing polity. They’re known in the literature and in Jewish history as the First Aliyah. They were not natives, but they were immigrants.

And then finally, in contrast, were those in the Second and the Third Aliyahs. They look to create their own exclusive polity. In other words, they look to displace the existing polity with one of their own, a Jewish nation state in place of the existing polity. These were the settlers. The settlers, from my point of view, are defined by a political project.

Both Jews and Judaism have flourished without settler colonialism. You just have to look at New York City, which is where I live. And contrasted with Israel, Jews in New York City are far safer and have a far more productive environment to create a flourishing Jewish life than they are in Israel.

Now I come to Judaization, Zionization. Unlike Jews and Judaism, Judaization is integral to settler colonialism. Underlying Judaization is the conviction that the land of Israel belongs to the Jewish people, and not necessarily to citizens of the state, and not to those who reside on the land.

A number of Jewish organizations have been historically created, the Jewish National Fund amongst them. And they’ve been established towards realizing this purpose: they historically, systematically privilege Jews, and just as systematically discriminate against Jews. They function as if they were state organizations, but are not subject to nondiscrimination laws.

Now, if Israel is to be a state for Jews only, it has to answer the question, who is a Jew? Its answer cannot avoid flattening the diversity of world Jewry into the Jewry sanctioned by the state. At the legal level, this question has bedeviled Israeli authorities since the Law of Return was passed in 1950. Is a Jew defined by religion, or by ethnicity, or both?

The state of Israel now has two legal definitions of who is a Jew: the narrow definition, provided by religious law, Halakha law, which Israel enforces in the sphere of personal affairs, and the broad definition in the amended Law of Return. Now, at the political and social level, Judaization eliminates unacceptable forms of Jewishness.

The acceptable form is associated with Ashkenazi, European Jews who trace their lineage to Yiddish-speaking parts of Europe. Ashkenazim were the founders of the state who claimed to be civilizers committed to bring other Jews into line with the national ideal. In particular, Ashkenazim have sought to civilize Mizrahim, and then later, the Falasha, Ethiopian Jews.

The Mizrahim are Jews. They present a special challenge to Zionism, for Zionism presumes that Arab and Jewish identity are both incompatible and indelibly hostile toward one another. Otherwise, there would be no need of a Jewish state in historic Palestine. Ashkenazi Israel has demanded of the Mizrahim that they denounce their Arab culture and embrace only their religion, Judaism. After several decades, the Mizrahim have paid back by standing behind a stark religious Zionism that has two targets: the Palestinians, but not only the Palestinians, also the Ashkenazi.

Judaization has two dominant aspects: Judaizing the land and Judaizing Jews, in particular Arab Jews. At the core of political Zionism is a political project to build not just a Jewish religious community in the Holy Land, but a Jewish state. Political Zionism seeks to erase the distinction between state and society. Thank you.

ATALIA OMER: Great. Thank you for getting us started already on the very depth of the grammar, the logic, that is unfolding, has unfolded, in Palestine/Israel.

So next I’ll turn to you, Dr. Sabbagh-Khoury. In recent work that I had the amazing privilege to read just recently, you have examined the production of knowledge in Israel in Israeli academia, highlighting the ideological blinders of most Jewish Israeli critical sociology, and you are listing of a few exceptions. How, in your view, has scholarship in Israeli academia persistently obscured the enduring and entrenched Jewish Zionist hegemony? And how does the field of comparative settler colonialism studies, this particular field, help to subvert this myopia? And what is the significance that such scholarship is often articulated by Palestinian Israeli scholars, such as yourself? More broadly, how do you think ’48 Palestinians fit into the colonial potential futures? Thank you.

AREEJ SABBAGH-KHOURY: Hello, everyone, and thank you for inviting me to participate today and for the [? generative ?] [INAUDIBLE] [? in ?] [? Somalia. ?] I should note the symbolism of giving a talk on decolonization as a Palestinian currently visiting in South Africa. I hope this will been an indication of the transmission of more political struggle.

In my work, I have traced [? how ?] [? much ?] [? protection ?] the Israeli scientific field has become embedded in broader regimes of power. For me, it wasn’t enough to rely on a simple formula of positionality automatically causes the production of a given discourse. In the end, it’s true that, where one feels oneself situated in social life, one’s relation not simply to the means of production in Marxist terms, but to land ownership, to the nation state via citizenship, to the [INAUDIBLE] via hierarchies of belonging. This is one important facet in understanding why discourses take shape as they do.

Sociologically, I have been interested in the practices of knowledge production, its collective nature, the attempts to the place accepted, or normative claims within movements, the diffusion of paradigms across geographies and temporalities. Doing so was particularly painstaking for me, as a Palestinian indigenous scholar citizen in Israel who received my degrees, all of my degrees, in Israeli institutions. I examine primarily why it is that national paradigms have dominated understanding of the political stakes of the Israeli-Palestinian conflict and find that such paradigm is, if it taken by itself, a mechanism of mystification that misses the fundamental settler colonial nature of Zionism, even if and when imaginations of nationalism and religion become institutionalized and [INAUDIBLE].

To be sure, Zionism fuses colonialism, nationalism, and religion, or, as [INAUDIBLE] writes, “Zionism is an articulation of all the major categories of modernity.” I examine why Israeli critical scholars may usefully take up post-colonial theory to explain constitutive inequalities between Mizrahim and Ashkenazim and the discrimination of Palestinian citizens in Israel, but omitted theories of colonization to describe the nature of relations between Zionist settlers and Palestinian officials, or why the analytic of colonialism was utilized to describe the 1967 occupation, but not the 1948. I pay attention to the formation of Israeli social theory in relation to modernization theory, where scholars [? elided ?] the state and settler violence and disposition that reshaped Palestinian social and political life.

I think about how Israeli epistemological apartheid, including the imposition of settler schemes of knowledge, shaped what the Israeli scholars came to conclude about the Arabs in their midst. I think about how one-quarter of Palestinian population that remained in Israel after 1948 was socially, politically, and economically devastated and still taking time to rebuild social life and, especially, an academic strata, following the devastating effects of the Nakba. Moreover, the very nature of the state violence in Israel, the military rule period that lasted from the emergence of the Israeli state in 1948 until ’66 and the social control that followed, alongside cultural marginalization and discrimination, precluded Palestinians from participating in Israeli institutions of knowledge production for decades.

I find that, in fact, it was primarily Palestinian scholars in the ’60s and ’70s and now who asserted that the nature of Israeli/Palestinian social relation was settler colonial. I argue that the settler colonial paradigm is an interpretative framework of [? conjugative ?] historical analogies and analytical comparisons. Settler colonialism is a series of contingent processes in which hierarchies of social kind become routinized and institutionalized in ways that advance settler claims of land and territorial sovereignty, often through encroaching violence.

The [AUDIO OUT] the [? exceptionalizes ?] Israel/Palestine. Comparative settler colonialism traces [INAUDIBLE] mechanisms across cases of colonial settlery that are shared and, thereby, also identify differences in the emergence of violence in interaction between settlers and natives. This feels direct as to what Edward Said would call a contrapuntal approach. In my work in this regard, I examine top-down processes, state actions, institutionalized practices, the gradual segmentation of structures, and also bottom-up practices, agency, [? daily ?] [? life, ?] struggle, popular resistance.

Since the Second Intifada in 2000 especially, that began the beginning of the failure, also, and the paradigm of the two states, and the repositioning of the Palestinian Israel within the Palestinian national movement, external political movement has contributed to the reanimation of Palestinian citizens of Israel in their articulation of an analytical approach to settler colonialism in Palestine. These are social actors who are by their historical situatedness in this place hold a phenomenological proximity to Jewish Israeli.

They speak Hebrew. Some live in so-called mixed cities. They may interact daily with Israeli Jews. They are educated with Israeli curriculum. But they also possess experience of exclusion. Many are subject to what Wacquant would call advanced marginality– ghettoization, spatial separation, abandonment by the welfare state.

They encounter symbolic and material violence, and they are steeped in what I theorize as a habitus of [INAUDIBLE] steadfastness, wherein they have acquired experiential knowledge to live in and navigate forms of subjugation and counteract them. They are deeply shaped by historical events, recalling the last political protest in May 2021, where Palestinian citizens organize a trans territorial strike unseen since the Great Arab Revolt in 1936-39. Importantly, the encounter between Palestinian and Israeli and Jewish Israelis is markedly different from that between Jewish Israelis and Palestinians in the 1967 occupied territories.

So in thinking about how we can theorize out of [? impasse, ?] we must consider all these accumulated features and political moments, recalling Mandela’s theorization on South Africa, [? or ?] the lenses of everyday life a Palestinian encounters in the Jewish state, but also, with a future of political liberations that Palestinian and Israel imagined for themselves, in unity with Palestinians everywhere, where they can play a major role in decolonization. In Mandela’s writing, the South African political [? moment ?] represented that transition period between apartheid and decolonization, when resistance transformed from spontaneous acts of contention to a durable force. This is what Palestinians and Israel have started to propose, organize to change, theorizing further questions of decolonizing the Jewish Israeli existence in Palestine Israel. Thank you.

ATALIA OMER: Thank you. I wonder if, Professor Mamdani, if you have an immediate reaction, since Areej is engaging with your work, or we can return to your thinking later.

MAHMOOD MAMDANI: Maybe return to me later, because I couldn’t hear very well. They’re all kind of muffled. The instrument muffles the voice.

ATALIA OMER: Yeah, we had– I also had a little bit difficulties, some difficulties, hearing. But I’m not sure what to do about that. All right, so I’ll turn to our third panelist, Dr. Bashir.

So my first question for you is really highlighting one critical thread in your scholarship in recent years has entailed the need to kind of deepen our analysis of Christian European modernity and its relevance to the three so-called questions– the Jewish question, the Muslim question, and the Palestine question. In a recent synthetic reflection that you contributed to the “Contending Modernities” blog that is housed at the University of Notre Dame– it’s kind of a synthetic reflection on the two recent publications that I mentioned, The Holocaust and the Nakba and The Arab Question and the Jewish Question.

So you write, and I quote, “The question of Palestine, the Jewish question, and the Muslim question are conceptually and historically linked, and their entanglement continues to fuel tensions in the Middle East, Europe, and the US”– end of quote. So I just would like to invite you to unpack these entanglements and their significance for a decolonial analysis of Palestine/Israel

BASHIR BASHIR: Thank you, Atalia. So let me just contextualize the unpacking that I will be shortly doing, and that is why the unpacking, or why this intertwining and intersection between these three questions are important, in the context of Israel/Palestine. And they are important for the following reason, that is that, if we interrogate these questions and reveal their intersections, we are stepping in what I call new moral and political [? agreement ?] for Israel Palestine.

And why this new moral and political [? agreement ?] is important– It’s important for the following reason. And I think there is a story to be told for us to make sense of these types of kind of sometimes even silenced connections and links and oppressed and policed types of links. And obviously, all of these links are under the banner of what I call interrogating modernity. But let me just tell the story very briefly in relation to the question of Israel/Palestine so we understand why these questions are important and how we unpack them.

And that is that for the past 30, 40 years, the question of Palestine has been imagined and articulated in a very particular type of vocabulary, imagination, concepts, and notions. And basically, this articulation and phrasing and framing of the Palestinian question, since the mid ’70s all the way to recently, about a decade ago, was shifting from emancipatory liberation discourse of anti-colonialism into peacemaking, or if you wish to, the statehood kind of discourse. And this was a remarkable shift that I am not going to assist now its strategic value. There are debates– there were debates back at the time in the Palestinian national movement. There are debates today who are reflecting back on this kind of pragmatic shift. Whatever the evaluation of that shift, that shift has been an extremely fundamental structural shift in Palestinian nationalism.

Therefore, the question of Palestine by the mainstream tendencies of it– I’m not saying that what I am proposing is exhaustive of the range of vocabularies that were displayed in order to explain Palestine, but the dominant vocabulary, the one that even embraced by the international community, so to speak, and by liberal normativity and its coordinates in that sense, has been framed around the language of peacemaking, around the language of conflict resolutions of different types. And basically, the state is, or the Palestinian state on the boundary, was basically the aim. And all of this is being articulated within the paradigm of partition because, without that, you don’t understand anything. Partition, as a colonial and imperial tool, is the paradigm within which these kind of concepts are being articulated.

Now, to cut a longer story short, there is a very serious, deep crisis when it comes to the question of Israel/Palestine in the past two decades, three decades, in light of the failure of partition epistemologically and politically to deliver any serious thing that brings us anywhere closer to what has been endorsed as a form of a possible political solution. And therefore, many scholars have been engaging in trying to understand these kind of realities through different lenses.

Some have appealed to history. Some to anthropology. Some have microhistory. Others have looked to political theology. In my contributions of my work that has been preoccupying me, my work and many other colleagues that we convene in the Kreisky Forum in Vienna, has been to attack this from a different angle. And that is actually to zoom out rather to zoom in, not in order to undermine the zooming in. The zooming in is happening– extremely critical and very inspirational for our work.

But the zooming out is very critical, in the sense that we need to understand for us to bring back the language of colonialism and settler colonialism to the equation, we need to reframe the question of Palestine in the larger global context and definitely through embedding it in the context within which it emerged. And that is political modernity. And that is– and with political modernity, I am eluding to the [? front ?] [? end ?] to several other things. And here I will start the unpacking in a few minutes.

One is the issue of the Jewish question. The Jewish question is a European question, and it is the failure of a Christian European nationalism to accommodate Jews. And therefore, by extension of the Jewish question, you have created the Palestinian question, which is basically meaning that actually we are here invited to interrogate European nationalism, because European nationalism with all– it comes with all of these– package of being very much informed by desire of homogeneity and purity as a very constitutive feature of political modernity, is something that I think we need really to understand and, surely, that the Jewish question is still burning and is still relevant. It’s not solved, from my assessment. So this is one thing to keep in mind.

But there is another feature that is very constitutive of political modernity that I think is very important to bring into the equation. Not only the drive for a purity and homogeneity, which has many manifestations, not only vis-á-vis the Palestinian questions, but also vis-á-vis many parts of Europe and beyond Europe, as many scholars have shown, and that this is within the rubric of nationalism. But if we add to that something that is intimately constitutive of that, which is a co-founding of modernity, of political modernity, that is settler colonialism, or imperialism, if you wish, with different iterations. And that is basically seeking to eliminate and exterminate natives for the purpose of creating new societies in different parts and rearranging boundaries and different technologies and different tools and practices and policies that were at the disposal of the enterprise of the nation state, when we move from the imperial order to the colonial– to the national order.

So these things all, if you wish– when we look at the question of Palestine in the contemporary times, we also see how, if you wish, we bring also anti-Semitism as a ready accusation, mobilized, weaponized, abused, used, in order to criminalize, silence Palestinians in their struggle for justice. And this is exactly the issue where, actually, in this sense, the discourse of Islamophobia has been indispensable to the articulation and reproduction of modernity and political violence, instead actually of focusing on anti-Semitism and showing how Europe hasn’t– Christian Europe hasn’t handled sufficiently the question, the Jewish question. Actually, the blame is shouldered on Muslims as racialized other in that context.

And all of these questions cannot be disconnected from each other because, in certain particular understanding, not only through the lens of Palestine– but I’m not going to make that claim now, because that is not the focus of my attention at the moment for the sake of this argument, because these questions also are related to many other spheres. So if I try to sum all of this, what we are trying to do in this kind of enterprise to this– through my work, at least, is really to interrogate European nationalism, to interrogate Zionism, and to interrogate Arab nationalism in a particular way. And I think these are very clearly intertwined and only through these kind of things, together with many other perspectives and contributions, I think we can pave the way for viable alternatives, theories and methodologies of decolonization that I think might be at our disposal in the context of Israel/Palestine.

ATALIA OMER: Great. Thank you so much for contextualizing and unpacking, and unpacking the kind of work that you are doing, in terms of thinking and articulating an alternative ethical normative grammar to think through the depths of the contextuality of the place. Before I turn to the next round of questions, I want to return to Dr. Sabbagh-Khoury and ask her to– maybe there are two– you said so many things that were so powerful and so important. And I wanted to ensure that the audience get a chance to think together with you about two points that you made, or two issues that you highlighted.

One is the cons– what you spoke about, what you understand as an epistemological apartheid. What does it mean? What are the political ramifications of an epistemological apartheid? I am highlighting this because, of course, what decoloniality is doing that is distinct, perhaps, from the anti-colonial stance, although they are interconnected, as well, is that it makes an intervention that is epistemological. So perhaps if we can kind of stay with it for a moment before we move on.

And another phrase that you use that really grabbed me was habitus of [INAUDIBLE]. And so I want to invite you to maybe say a few more words about that.

AREEJ SABBAGH-KHOURY: Thank you, Atalia. Could you hear me now more clearly?

ATALIA OMER: I hear you just fine.

AREEJ SABBAGH-KHOURY: Yes? Because I changed the setting here. I’m in a room that I am not adjusted to. So it’s clear now, more clear?

ATALIA OMER: Yes. I can hear you quite well.

AREEJ SABBAGH-KHOURY: OK. So I was talking about how the Palestinian/Israel– a very new proposal– proposing to study Israel as a settler colonial is they are trying to deconstruct the epistemological apartheid in terms that, previously, the Palestinians scholarship wasn’t part of the Israeli academia for different reasons. So for me, it was one of the things to think about and write through tracing the knowledge production in Israel, how we can think about deconstructing this epistemological apartheid. And when I examined the transformation and different paradigms through the Israeli– mainly through Israeli [? sociology ?] and history, I came to understand how proposing a different moment, a different political moment, that was first organized and articulated through political activism, through– I’ll talk more later about this– through the return of history that mobilized the Palestinian scholars to meet the nature of the Zionist movement.

As to the habitus of [INAUDIBLE], I just argued that the Palestinian encounter symbolic and material violences. And they are seeped in this habitus of [INAUDIBLE] that their daily life somehow turns to be a struggle and navigating through different forms of hierarchies and discrimination. But at the same time, their agency in navigating against and working against these structures of power since the beginning of the Nakba in 1948– they had this ability to formulate and to act politically in a way that– you want an example that I can draw from the [? closet ?] period when most of the world was under military– enclosed in their houses, and et cetera. I say to myself, the– all of the world became Palestinian, in terms that we are in this framework of military rule, despite our ability to mobilize, because we are– all the time, Palestinians are [? surveillanced. ?] But they learned how to navigate against it and to propose different forms of sociality that I’ll relate later to.

ATALIA OMER: Great, thank you. So before I turn to the next round of questions, interrelated questions, I would like to invite the audience to submit your questions. And we’ll try to get to as many as possible, and the hope is to have a fruitful conversation. OK, so as I said, now round two, a set of interrelated questions for all the participants, with the recognition that each one of you will come at that question or the set of questions from a different perspective, different set of intellectual genealogies. So again, that makes the discussion deeper and more layered.

So the question is, what do you think about decolonial scholarship’s role in deepening the potential for decolonial and anti-colonial political praxis? And since this event, this panel, is happening in an academic space attentive to how religion intersects with violence in all its forms, but also, potentially, with emancipatory scripts, what space do your visions of decoloniality or the anti-colonial give to religious meanings and identities? Why and how naming the situation, using the comparative analytic of settler colonialism, or the comparison with the end of South African apartheid, or other kind of resources that you draw on to think comparatively, to de-exceptionalize, in some respects, the case, help us shift from the enthnoreligious, national, separationist, majoritarian formula that has defined the grammar of, quote-unquote, peace in that context. So maybe we’ll start with you, Dr. Bashir.

BASHIR BASHIR: Yeah, sure. Let me relate to two points here that I think are relevant for– or they captured my attention, the first regarding the scholarship. I think the scholarship has been incredibly useful for the past 20 years in pushing very seriously the discourse of settler colonialism as a relevant frame for integrating Israel/Palestine. You have to understand that the [? odds ?] were great, and you have to understand the dominance and the hegemony of the discourse that I just alluded earlier on about this peacemaking discourse. And the industry that was, or the industries, that was feeding, that were feeding these types of hegemony and paradigm were really, really remarkable.

And in that sense, there has been very remarkable achievements for the scholarship that has been persistent in the past 20, 30 years or so in penetrating these, if you wish, castle that was hermetically closed, in terms of not really allowing much these voices to come and become vocal about that. And I think what we are witnessing recently about the legitimacy of these kind of terms as lenses, vocabularies, and terms and concepts that have become more legitimate than any time before to use, even among– not only in academic circles, but also in diplomatic activist circles, including settler colonialism, apartheid et cetera. So in that sense, there is a very serious pioneering role for reviving, because this discourse has existed in Palestinian contexts in a way or another, and persisted all the way through. But it never had the attention that it is receiving recently with the help of many others, and in that sense, many, many, many contributors and in different parts of the world. So that’s really the remarkable thing.

However, I have one major reflection here that I think is a type of critique on that. And that critique has two faults. One, I think settler colonialism has been established as an interpretive analytical frame. I think it’s about time that we also not stop there, but move very much about trying to say what decolonization would entail. There is a difference between saying settler colonialism is the analytical and interpretive frame– that’s fine. That’s very helpful for diagnosis, and I think it comes against [? wild ?] [? odds. ?] And I think there are serious qualifications here that need to be very tailored very carefully.

This is my second point. The first point, nevertheless, has been that I think we need also to move to what a process of decolonization, and doing colonialism meaning decolonization, what decolonization means. This is a very critical question. And I think here the spectrum is very wide about the potentialities, the methodologies, and the alternatives, and the theories. And I think the disagreements are greater than we are willing to admit when it comes to the outcome of decolonization. This takes me to the second point.

And the second point is that I think, as much as South Africa and many other cases have been inspirational for our context– I think that has been extremely, tremendously useful and educational and informative. However, I think we need to be very careful about drawing these kind of analogies without qualifications and care of the particular type. In the context of Israel/Palestine, Zionism is definitely a settler colonial movement par excellence, in my point of view. But it also has a very powerful dimension of nationalism that I think has been remarkably successful, by the way.

Without now passing judgment about what did it do, as Professor Mamdani was alluding, reducing the potentiality of being a Jew under the rubric of Zionism has shrinked, whereas before that, things and the spectrum was wider. So that’s something that– it needs to be debated, and I think it’s very relevant. And today, I was earlier speaking to a group of Jewish leaders in this here– in Jerusalem in that perspective. I think this is something that we need to open. And Palestinians have say and have something to contribute to that. But that’s– so this is one.

And the second thing is that I think, while we are engaging– and this takes me to the second point that you raised, Atalia, about majoritarianism and what is the entry here. And I think there are really very serious clashes and tensions, way more than we are willing to admit, between constitutional liberalism as a potential way forward and post-national type of engagement, if you wish, and between national rubric and national grammar as the answer to that. And I think these are very serious clashes. There are serious contradictory tensions between them. Obviously, the spectrum is wide how you can accommodate some combinations of some sort.

And I definitely think that the way for that is what I conceptualize in my private work, and some of it is jointly with other, what I call egalitarian binationalism. And I think egalitarian binationalism, the way, at least, I theorize and conceptualize in my work, is much more promising, if you ask me, not necessarily from the perspective of ethics, but definitely from the perspective of sensitivities of the specificities of the context of Israel and Palestine and the history of the Jews and the history the Palestinians with some these kind of rubrics, with certain conditions, obviously.

And the most important condition of that– and I finish by this, because this relates also to the issue of religion, is basically dismantling and rejecting any form of exclusivity of Jewish supremacy of any sort. Under the egalitarian binationalism that I am proposing, inspired by some other who have done some important work in that respect, is to say that, under this rubric, there is no possibility, even by definition– defining egalitarian by nationalism normatively, the way I define it, doesn’t tolerate at all any form of privileges, exclusivity, and form of a Jewish supremacy of any particular type. But it does allow certain space for certain communitarian national dealing of some sort to be accommodated under the rubric of possible arrangement and possible things.

So I think, to sum this point and finish. I think it’s about time that we scholars who are engaged in that, who are, some of us, also activists in the field, to start moving also, in this very specific context of Israel/Palestine, to start moving towards unpacking and naming the visions and the contradictions, the tensions, that are involved in that, not with the hope that what you design in labs and intellectual gymnastics in libraries necessarily is going to be the platform of activism. But actually, we are inspired very much by the specificities of what we are witnessing in Israel/Palestine.

And this is precisely why I believe this is decolonizing, as well, because this goes against the fixes of political modernity, the way Zionism wanted to implicate in that through what– understanding Zionism to entail statist enterprise, statist logic, [INAUDIBLE] and, obviously, vulgar ethnonationalism of the mainstream Zionism, because Zionism is also many things. It’s not one thing. And in that sense, I think it’s the time for us who are involved in this to push a little bit forward and move from the prognosis to the– from the diagnosis also to the prognosis, and start moving out to do these visions and what it entails in decolonization process.

ATALIA OMER: Thank you. I feel very compelled by the kind of argument that you made, because you highlight the effectiveness, the analytic effectiveness, of that kind of comparative application of the lens of settler colonialism, or apartheid, or whatnot. But kind of what I heard very strongly is the call for not only the demolition, but recognizing that there need to be a– for sure, if you want to think along decolonial register, we need to destabilize and undo any kind of supremacist discourse, and within that context or that grammar of egalitarian by nationalism that you have articulated.

But it’s not only about demolition. It’s also about building. And you use the language of vision and be specific in terms of the vision and here there is a space for thinking of the positive content that will– not only on the negative, but the positive ethical meaning that will constitute this, the space or the political community. So I think this is a very important constructive intervention that is in contrast to that image that you put forward of the lab or the seminar room, that purism of the lab discourse.

So Dr. Sabbagh-Khoury, maybe we’ll turn to you now for your reactions, reflections on that question.

AREEJ SABBAGH-KHOURY: Yeah, I think, Atalia, your question also is related to what I said previously that Mahmood didn’t hear, which is– I really want to repeat, because I find his work is very illuminating while we think about decolonization. And I argue that in thinking about how we can theorize out of impasse, we must consider all the accumulated features and political moments that Mamdani talks about of the violences of everyday life, as well, and which Palestinian encounters in the Jewish state, but also, of a future political liberation that Palestinian and Israel imagine.

They are not just talking about settler colonialism or diagnosing the case as settler colonialism. But they are proposing and imagining forms of unity with Palestinians everywhere, where they can play a major role in decolonization. And again, in Mandela’s writing about the South Africa political moment represented that transition period between apartheid and decolonization, when resistance transformed from spontaneous acts of contention to a durable force– this is what Palestinians in Israel have started to propose, organize the change, theorizing for the question of decolonizing the Jewish Israeli existence in Israel/Palestine.

And referring also to the question that I didn’t address completely about the role of this Palestinian, ’48 Palestinians, we should clarify here that we are talking about two different things. One is Palestinian political action and intellectual knowledge production. The other is material decolonization. They are inseparable and co-productive. Knowledge production– and this is why it is important, also, to trace settler colonialism, is an indispensable tool for struggle.

[? Autessere ?] teaches us settler colonialism is a struggle for materialism. I argue in parallel way to Marxian thought that critical intellectuals, especially indigenous scholars, must carry out a theorizing distractive to the colonial apparatus, while it’s the political praxis, including the return of history, that is, the return of the Nakba to the public sphere and international solidarity, that allows for the intellectual change. It is the scholar role, beside the activists, to propel thoughts into political actions and contribute to the articulation of the just political projects. The settler colonial framework is an accessory tool in anti-colonial liberation praxis and decolonization. We must be capable of diagnosing and then explaining the colonial condition.

And with that, there’s a condition that makes Zionism so [INAUDIBLE], the context of European modernity and racialization, the Holocaust and more, in order to proscribe liberatory ways out for Palestinians and Jewish Israelis. Perhaps you don’t have to be a Palestinian scholar to be able to describe the colonial condition. And even social and spatial conditions shape an everyday life defined by Israeli supremacy. So theoretically, we need to continue unpacking technologies of power, in which the colonizer and colonized hierarchically construct a system of control. But we must caution ourselves against easy structuralist explanations, and instead understand how contingencies may lead to institutionalized violence.

Last, we must continue debunking the conflation of Zionism and Judaism. The intellectual is implicated as a subject with responsibility in decolonization. In this sense, Antonio Gramsci articulates the role of organic intellectual in countering cohesion, while, for him, it will always be the mass who can precipitate a revolution. And Edward Said sees a powerful role for the intellectual as someone who can contest convictions and institutions and be wholly invested in critique for public. Here, too, feminist thought and theory becomes crucial. In the tradition of feminist thought, scholarship works toward identifying structural conditions and social construction of gender, critiquing masculinist power and patriarchy and [? filtering ?] the subjectivity that has been prominently absent from much intellectual criticism.

This is a way of reflecting on additional frames that structure society– gender, sexuality, and race, which are contingent formations that interact and intersect [INAUDIBLE] across geographies and temporalities, without neglecting materialist aspects. The articulation of [INAUDIBLE] political [INAUDIBLE] we must recognize how the circulation of the settler colonial paradigm not only contributes to an indictment of power structure, but counters with a different way of being in the world, a model of relation and socially predicated on the disposal of colonial privileges and the envisioning of a just future for all.

I will not, however– that I don’t want to overestimate the role of the intellectual. Intellectual labor embeds the scholar in institutional settings that constrains certain action and delimits possibilities. And movements for decolonization don’t necessitate the forms of intellectual discourse we invest our lives in producing. The Palestinian intellectual leader, Azmi Bishara, that moved from the academy to the formal political sphere to propose the project of the state for all of its citizens, for instance, illustrate the ways material decolonization becomes intertwined with intellectual efforts.

That was decades ago. The challenge now is to rearticulate a liberationist and decolonizing project with the atmosphere of the Israeli right wing [INAUDIBLE] and the nation-state law, and to overcome the discrepancy between the decolonizing academic project [? here. ?] We all talk about, in academia, in critical academic discourses, about decolonizing academic project, on the one hand, and the present. But there is a present fractured Palestinian nationalist political movement that embraced that.

But ending with a hopeful note, Palestinian youth all over Palestine maintain a renewed hope. They sense their own volition in decolonization. I think they will be the force to propose these formulas or political project [INAUDIBLE] that will work to decolonize our epistemologies and our existence. Thank you.

ATALIA OMER: Thank you. So many points– one that I think that is so profoundly important is– among the many that you articulated, is the point about the political economy that is often, or is not always, center to the analysis, and also for thinking about the decolonial and the anti-colonial. And I was reflecting back to the initial response by Professor Mamdani about– Professor Mamdani, you mentioned in your first response the Jewish National Fund and its participation in the colonization of Palestine, preceding, of course, 1948, preceding the Nakba. And so that point about the political economy is so critical.

And also the point about the role of scholarship in political movement– of course, not to overemphasize the importance of the scholar– this is a point well taken. But it’s also in a context that is very anti-intellectual. It’s this kind of intervention that is epistemological. It is about the very framing of the discourse, like Bashir spoke, Dr. Bashir spoke about the hegemony of peace, the peacebuilding hegemony that presumes segregation, separation, ethnoreligious homogeneity. And this is where I see, also, convergences.

And I’ll turn to you, Professor Mamdani. For instance, in your book you engage very critically with the whole discourse of transitional justice. So that was kind of like one point of connections that I was thinking about when Bashir spoke about the hegemony of peacebuilding, with respect to thinking concretely about Palestine/Israel. So I’ll turn to you and what grabbed you in that set of interrelated questions.

MAHMOOD MAMDANI: Thank you. Thank you very much. Let me just say at the outset that I am inspired by the responses of my colleagues. They are very productive, and they take our discussion forward. And they take our discussion forward, I think, not as much by providing answers, but providing a set of questions which open up new areas of inquiry.

Now let me start where I agree. South Africa– what should be the status of our study of South Africa? I certainly do not think that we should be studying South Africa in order to draw from it a blueprint, not at all. I think South Africa can provide lessons. South Africa can not provide a one size fits all formula, because history is specific.

Political movements are specific. A political mobilization is lesser or greater. And it is around not always the same issue, but different issues. But she had mentioned the tremendous importance of nationalism in the Israel/Palestine case today. And I think all that has to be taken into account.

At the same time, the lessons of the same place, the history of the same place– Dr. Sabbagh-Khoury mentioned, made reference to, Azmi Bishara and the notion of a state of all the people, not a state of the majority, a state of all the people, a state of all citizens. And I will make a distinction between citizens and people. So let me go to your set of questions, including this what does it mean to be thinking on decolonial terms.

I think first of all, it means changing the frame. And I think the critical change in the frame has to be from the criminal to the political. It has to take a settler colonialism not as a collection of individual crimes, but as a political project. And there is a difference between the two. Taking settler colonialism is a collection of criminal crimes with a view to moving forward in a notion of crime and punishment, either courts or the battlefield, I think that’s the heart of transitional justice, not the battlefield, but the courts, anyway. And I think that’s hugely problematic.

I think part of the problem is that the American notion of criminal justice has become a hegemonic notion. The journey began with Nuremberg in Nazi Germany. And the problem with criminal justice is always that crime is transgression of the law. And therefore, the state cannot commit a crime, because the state makes law. Crime can only be committed by individuals. It can be committed by individual agents of the state, but not by the state.

Now, that’s a very problematic starting point. If your starting point is political, then you understand that this question cannot be addressed from the point of view of grievances of individuals. It has to be addressed from the point of view of entire groups which have been excluded from the political process. And the solution can only be political. It cannot be individual. It cannot be based on the question of crime and punishment. So that’s my first understanding.

Second, your question of religion and violence– and let me say, I, again, find it find it very interesting but educative that Bashir puts this as a problem of modernity. And I agree entirely, because modernity politicizes culture. And it politicizes particular cultural identities, right from 1492 Iberia– the claim that this land must be a land of a single people with a single religion, the trigger to the Hundred Years’ War, which followed in Europe, more or less 100 years, a war between different religions, Catholics and Protestants.

The solution to that war, whether theoretically in John Locke or politically in the series of agreements, was basically that the majority must have sovereignty. And this majority should respect the individual rights of the minority, but the minority cannot have sovereignty. Now that was the liberal state. But the Iberian state was the non-liberal one. This is the liberal one. And the liberal state has been the basis of the problem.

The problem of Israel is that it began with a claim to create a liberal state with a sovereign majority but respecting individual rights of minorities, and has now moved to the non-liberal Iberian-style state trying to ethnically cleanse the land, by hook or by crook. And from then on, you had different identifiers of civilization, civilizing mission, race being one of the most important ones.

So what about the place of religion? In my view, cultural diversity is crucial, but it has to be in the domain of culture. We need to depoliticize, or we need to think of ways of depoliticizing culture, so that politics itself can rise above these diversities and does not just duplicate and reflect these diversities. And politics itself, which has become the basis of identity formation, not culture– really, politics has become the basis of identity formation under modernity is– that’s the paradigm, we need to change.

Final question– why and how naming the situation using the competitive analytical settler colonies helps us to shift from the problem to something forward. So I go to South Africa. I said we can take lessons from it, and I’ll just take one lesson from it. In 1955, the ANC had a program called the Freedom Charter. Freedom Charter had a ringing declaration in it. It said South Africa belongs to all those who live in it. It didn’t say South Africa belongs to all its citizens. It said South Africa belongs to all those who live in it, all its residents.

In 1994, the first post-apartheid election, there was a big controversy who should be allowed to vote– citizens of South Africa or everybody who lives in South Africa? Now, the question was hugely important, because millions of people lived in South Africa who were not citizens. These were migrant workers from just outside of South Africa. And the migrant workers had been critical in trade union elections– in trade union formation, sorry. And the decision then was that anybody who lives in South Africa must have a right to vote.

But from then on, with Mangosuthu Buthelezi and inkatha Party taking over internal affairs in a post-apartheid South Africa, from then on, the rights of migrants were chipped away at step by step. And you had this confrontation between citizen and migrant with xenophobic violence in South Africa. Now, I just want to draw two lessons from it.

One lesson is, if you take this lesson for Israel/Palestine, to me it means that the question of the ’48 Palestinians, the 1948 Palestinians who lived outside the borders of Israel/Palestine is critical and crucial. How that question is resolved will decide whether any resolution will work or not.

Secondly, I don’t think the role of the intellectual– I do not think it is the business of the intellectual to come up with solutions. I don’t think intellectuals can frame a blueprint within the confines of his or her study. I think– so I’m a political theorist, but not in the liberal sense of trying to form a blueprint of what’s the good society. No, I think we take our starting point– popular struggles, a political mobilization, social mobilization, social movements, political movements, which are necessarily internally contradictory, which necessarily move– the center of gravity in these movements shifts as the movements are shaped by actual conflict on the ground.

The business of the intellectual is to take the raw material from the experiences of these movements. And then the work of the intellectual is to address the internal contradictoriness of this raw materials and to present back to the movement its own work, but in a rethought form. Thank you very much.

ATALIA OMER: Thank you. Again, so many critical issues about the concept, of course, of the decolonial is a response– it’s the other side of that construct coloniality that emerges, especially in the context of Latin American thought that understands the history and the epistemology that relates to the colonial space from Christian Europe to modernity. So to think about– so I appreciate so much how those conversations, Bashir’s particular focus on modernity with respect to the three interrelated, quote-unquote, “questions,” and Mahmood’s points that you just unpacked right now, how the recent interventions, of course, also on the epistemological apartheid– those convergences are so powerful.

And already, I think that some of the questions in the Q&A have already been alluded to in just those final reflections, especially the issue of– one question was with respect to the issue of the return of Palestinian refugees and the degree to which its criticality to that discourse of the decolonial register, the thinking through of that different frame. And that also relates to kind of a specific question addressed to Bashir, with respect to that the specificity, that concreteness, of that new ethical grammar of the egalitarian binationalism. And perhaps you can– maybe that would be– we’ll conclude with this here from you, and then maybe another word from Dr. Sabbagh-Khoury, if you want to add anything.

But, Bashir, would– basically, the question that came from the audience was about the– what’s the chance for that vision, that egalitarian binationalism to actually be– to materialize? So certainly, not within the contemporary frame, but go ahead.

BASHIR BASHIR: So I think my understanding of the question is that there is a confusion between egalitarian binationalism as an ethical principle and between binationalist state as an institution, a constitutional arrangement of some sort. I think these are very, very different things. Definitely, egalitarian binationalism, as an ethical principle and a political frame, can lead to a binational state. But it doesn’t necessarily have to be subscribing to this particular thing.

So binationalism, in that sense– the way I look at it with the help of others and for instance, my work with Amos Goldberg places, for instance, the Holocaust and the Nakba at the very core of this. And this takes us, again, to the refugees, the question of the Palestinian refugees. You have– you cannot have any decolonizing process or any imagination that is alternative to the dominant paradigm without bringing the question of the refugees to the center of this politics. The Nakba and before the Nakba, it’s definitely the case. But definitely the issue of the refugees is at the center, and the right of Palestinians, to return is at the center of this configuration. This is, potentially, by invoking that, is definitely the way to decolonize, and it has a potential of decolonization.

Now, the very concrete solution of how you really materialize the right of return is something that I think, as Professor Mamdani was alluding, the specificities of the context are really [? troublingsome ?] and changing and shifting, depending on gravity and power and arrangements. But in terms of the very basic principle, that very much of invoking the right of return has to be constitutive central thing is the most important thing, because the Palestinian question is not about statehood. Statehood is the vehicle through which Palestinians achieve rights. The rights are the [INAUDIBLE] that are much fundamental here. And the right of self-determination of return and many other rights are the fundamental core issues here.

But the last point that I want to make, nevertheless, in this context that I think one of the things that we need really to face very powerfully, and as the South African has a charter, freedom of charter, it’s true that political theorist doesn’t have necessarily to propose solutions. But nevertheless, political theorists also have some role with other activists of envisioning certain visions of some sort that can be fueled and can be platforms for political deliberations and articulation.

And that sense, I think, this is precisely where now those who are engaged in this scholarship needs and ought to start passing the way forward, through which also they will bring to the center of this attention, also, the Jewish Israeli rights to this, because the minute you start saying that the Mediterranean river between– the territory between the river and the sea is the analytical frame and you want to decolonise, part of what you need also to confront and engage with a very daring way is also bringing to the very center of attention not only the Palestinian rights, which are fundamental and the basic structural thing. But also, you will have to bring to the equation also the presence of the Israeli Jews and the success of the formation of certain national identity of a particular type.

That is not something that liberal normativity can accommodate, at least in the context of what we are trying. But definitely we will have to be very careful about the disasters and the problematic capital of ethno vulgar nationalism, the way Zionism definitely have impacted also Palestinian nationalism. We need to open up these types of questions and put for them forward and try to unpack them with [INAUDIBLE] and courage, and intellectual and political courage through which we can– now, does that commit us to a very particular institutional solution of a particular type?

No, I think these are things that will be the subject and the object and the result of a political process that is going to be very painful, because the present and the future, for the [? seen ?] future, is very bleak and very, very, very problematic in that sense, because it’s all about Jewish privilege and Jewish supremacy. And this is why we need, in that shift that we are doing, in the new paradigm or the new grammar that, at least in my work with Amos Goldberg and people who that you alluded to and others such as [INAUDIBLE] and many others who are saying, basically, that we need to shift to this language of right, but bearing in mind also aspects of political theology.

And in that sense, I have something to say about religion that I think might be a little bit too much now to bring in, because we are running out of time. But I think religion– the way it was depicted in this conversation is also very problematic. I think religion in the very specific context of Zionism needs to be unpacked very seriously, because it needs to be understood in relation to this kind of interrogating modernity, because of the question of political theory, the way Zionism is materialized in Palestine, also is something that is worth paying attention and unpacking in a very critical way.

ATALIA OMER: Perhaps you want to say just a few words since you kind of– about what you mean by how we– the ways in which religion has been portrayed in this conversation is problematic? Bashir?

BASHIR BASHIR: Sorry.

ATALIA OMER: I said perhaps you want to just say– unpack a few– say a few more words about–

BASHIR BASHIR: I don’t want to be unfair, because we didn’t pay much attention to that. But my point is that you wouldn’t understand it in isolation from political theology. Zionism is a religious thing. They make it with the language of secularism, and secularism– we slip into this kind of thing that you are very familiar and in your writings, as well, about this relationship between the secular and religious and all of that type.

But in the very specific context here I think, while we need to very much be critical about the potential of religion being conflated with nationalism, we need to be very, very seriously, also, in that kind of decolonization, also through the insistence of not– on the issues of exclusivity and issue of eliminating any form of superiority and privilege. I think we, by definition, committed to these principles, already mediate a very particular notion of religion that actually remains to be relevant for politics, but not in the way that it is actually leading to certain exclusivity and international politics of some sort.

ATALIA OMER: Yeah thank you for bringing this up. And I’ll just telegraph that we’ve had– earlier this semester, we had a panel that interrogated those issues. We also had [INAUDIBLE] as part of the panel on a new book called When Politics Are Sacralized, co-edited by Nadim Rouhana and Nadera Shalhoub-Kevorkian that really illuminates even the secular registers of Zionism as a political movement. Of course, it relies on a biblical grammar that religion, in the context of contemporary Israel, really obscures– obscures that and obscures that of the settler colonial dynamics. So thank you for bringing this up.

So perhaps a last word from Dr. Sabbagh-Khoury from South Africa.

AREEJ SABBAGH-KHOURY: Thank you, Atalia. I want to just propose that the challenge now, I think, for Palestinian is if Palestinians can convert from the Palestinian question to the Jewish question and to the existence of the Israeli Jews in Palestine. And this is how I think decolonization is possible. And I think that all of Palestinians and critical Israeli [INAUDIBLE] should combine to work together, including the intellectuals and the political activists, to propose such a political moment of transformation, because we have– again, to just accentuate the idea of diagnosing the settler colonial conditions. Most of Israelis don’t perceive themselves as settlers, because of the specificity of the relation of the Israelis, of the Jews, to Palestine or to the areas of Israel.

So this is a crucial component that proposing and asking about proposing their existence in Palestine and deconstructing the supremacy of being a Jewish Israeli is very important for this realization of– to decolonize we must bring back the question of the history of this [? existence, ?] but also enabling a different way of sociality and being in Palestine that is not supremacist, that is for all Palestinian and Israelis. And this is what I perceive as the major challenge for decolonization.

ATALIA OMER: Thank you. How to be a [? political ?] community that is not supremacist is a profound challenge. Thank you so much for this incredibly generative conversation. Thank you for staying a few extra minutes. There are so many more questions and so many more threads to unpack. And really, the hope is that this kind of decolonial engagement will just continue to deepen intellectually and also materially, in terms of praxis. So thank you. It’s such a great honor to be a part of this conversation for me. So thank you, everybody.

SPEAKER 2: Sponsor Religion, Conflict, and Peace Initiative.

SPEAKER 1: Copyright 2021, President and Fellows of Harvard College.

========================================================

https://www.thenation.com/article/archive/bds-anti-zionist-activism-atalia-omer-interview/A New Generation of Jewish Activists Is Transforming Judaism Itself

Atalia Omer’s new book considers how American Jews are making solidarity with Palestinians a central feature of their spiritual practice and identity.

By Nathan Goldman

SEPTEMBER 26, 2019

Over the past few years, especially since the 2014 Gaza war, a growing number of younger American Jews have been questioning the supposedly unquestionable bond between Jewish identity and support of Israel. Many of them have been moved to organized action to unsettle the American Jewish community’s pro-Israel consensus. In her new book, Days of Awe: Reimagining Jewishness in Solidarity With Palestinians, Atalia Omer—associate professor of religion, conflict, and peace studies at the University of Notre Dame—sets out to document and contextualize this burgeoning movement. She charts the rise of organized Jewish movements (including IfNotNow and Jewish Voice for Peace) that directly speak and act against Israel’s treatment of Palestinians, often targeting the mainstream Jewish establishment, which champions Israel and opposes dissent. She also looks at groups (such as the student group Open Hillel and the radical synagogue Tzedek Chicago) that seek to integrate more complex and critical discussions of Israel into the Jewish community. By analyzing the rhetoric, practices, and self-conceptions associated with these movements and organizations, Omer considers how a new generation of Jewish activists is making solidarity with Palestinians a central feature of their Jewish practice and identity—and is thus transforming the very meaning of contemporary Jewishness.

But how is this transformation taking place? Omer suggests that it involves a fusion of critiques of American Jewish complicity in structures of oppression and the retrieval of Jewish prophetic and ethical traditions. In Days of Awe, Omer brings together interviews with activists, historical analysis, and theoretical interventions (drawing from religious studies and social movement theory, among other disciplines), all in the service of one of the first extended studies of this growing movement of American Jews standing against the Israeli occupation, and standing up for justice for Palestinians.

Omer delves into the details of the movement’s theory and praxis, while also tracing its relationship to and intersection with other sites of struggle—for instance, against anti-Semitism, anti-black racism, and Islamophobia, and for decolonization, feminism, and queer liberation. She also probes the movement’s possible limits. She offers sophisticated, sympathetic critiques and asks what untapped intellectual resources might complicate the movement’s preconceptions while also advancing its aims.

Top ArticlesREAD MOREFlushing Democracy

I spoke with Omer by phone for this interview. Our conversation has been edited for length and clarity.

—Nathan Goldman

Nathan Goldman:What was the impetus behind the research that would become Days of Awe? How did it develop over the years you were working on it?

Atalia Omer: Initially, I wanted to do some comparative work. I was trying to get away, actually, from an exclusive focus on Israel-Palestine. But the more I started talking to American Jewish diaspora activists, the more I realized that there was a really important story there to focus on. I saw that it needed to have its own book.

RELATED ARTICLE

FROM HARVARD STUDENTS TO DIPLOMATS—THE US IS TURNING AWAY EVER MORE PALESTINIANS

Mairav Zonszein

NG: You argue that when Jewish anti-occupation and Palestine solidarity activists deploy Jewish religious ideas, liturgies, and ritual in protests, it’s not just an instrumental political tactic. Rather, by actively engaging religious practices, texts, and symbols, Jewish activists are actually transforming their meaning in a religious sense. How does that distinction manifest itself?

AO: To start with, the reinterpretation of Jewish symbols, holidays, and liturgies as forms of protest is used to shock and confront the Jewish establishment. The movements use the establishment’s language, which makes it a very effective form of protest. When, for instance, activists build a sukkah in front of the embassy on Sukkot to protest ethnic cleansing of Bedouins, it has a particular impact. That’s the instrumental impact. But also, when I talked to people who participated in those kinds of protests, some of them talked about how, for the first time, they felt welcome and at home and consistently Jewish. In that space of protest, and in the very act of protest, they also rediscovered what it meant to be Jewish. So this becomes something that moves beyond just fighting the occupation or particular policies.

NG: How is that use of the Jewish establishment’s language against itself related to rediscovering what it means to be Jewish?

AO: Jewish anti-occupation and Palestine solidarity movements, such as IfNotNow and Jewish Voice for Peace, use the language of “transforming the Jewish community.” This involves a sense of anger against the elders: the establishment, the educational institutions, the various summer camps and day schools. All that goes beyond just fighting Israeli policies, and how they pretend to represent Jews worldwide and American Jews specifically. It goes beyond the complicity of the American Jewish establishment in enabling the occupation through financial support and political lobbying. Jews in these movements come to feel and say, “My Judaism is not occupation.” But then there comes the recognition that they need to also ask, “Well, what is my Judaism?”

I missed it, but the day before Passover this year, the radical synagogue I attend, Tzedek Chicago, invited Omar Barghouti, the cofounder of the BDS movement, to speak. He was stopped by a US immigration agent in Tel Aviv, and he wasn’t allowed to come. But he still talked to us over Skype. Even though he couldn’t come physically, it was meaningful that he came to a Jewish space. He talked about liberation struggle on the eve of Passover. That moment was meaningful, beyond the question of how it can help the movement. And it’s important for us to think beyond that instrumental level, to generate some sort of constructive reimagining.

NG: In the book, sociologist James M. Jasper’s notion of “moral battery” and your own idea of “critical caretaking” are two of the key concepts you use to understand how anti-occupation and Palestine solidarity activism can lead to this reshaping of the communal definition of Jewishness. Could you briefly explain those concepts and how they function here?

AO: “Moral battery” comes from Jasper’s study of social movements and their mechanics. It describes something I saw and felt in my research, especially during the delegation to the West Bank I went on with the Center for Jewish Nonviolence. There’s the electrifying sense of that communal space. Durkheim calls it “collective effervescence.” Jasper talks about it in terms of the negative and positive of a battery. On the one hand, standing in the southern hills of Hebron, it’s devastating, it’s horrific. You have a feeling of ethical outrage and disgust, and a sense of “this is not my Judaism.” That’s the negative. But the very act of engaging in solidarity, taking directives from the other—in this case, from the Palestinian partners—that creates this electrifying sense of love, and of self-love. That’s the positive. And that combination generates a sense of force and transformative capability.

My concept of “critical caretaking,” which I started to develop in my first book, is about bringing religion into conversations about addressing and transforming violence. This always involves a process of critique—of historicizing identities, historicizing narratives, of “unlearning” (which is the language that the activists often use). But there’s also caretaking of the religious tradition, which is the constructive sense, and requires religious, cultural, and historical literacy. So I’m putting the critical lens and the constructive practices together. They need to come together. Reimagination needs both to be deeply historical and to have that opening for innovation and change. The effort of reshaping the communal self operates multidirectionally.

NG: Much of the activism you discuss in the book relies, at least to some extent, on social media. What do you see as social media’s role in contemporary Jewish anti-occupation and Palestine solidarity activism?

AO: It’s absolutely critical. So many of the activists, especially the young activists, really want to have their stories out there: their stories of transformation and change. For instance, when they go to the occupied territories and come back. It’s a tool to reach out to broader publics, and to educate, and to generate counter-narratives. Especially since in mainstream Jewish formal spaces there are so many restrictive practices, like the policing of questioning. And the movements produce a lot of the reimagining of Jewishness online. Blogs become spaces for alternative liturgies, for the weekly parashot—readings from the Torah—which often reinterpret.

NG: Are there broad lessons that the forms of political work you’ve examined in Days of Awe hold for radical political movements in general?

AO: One of the fascinating facets of these Jewish movements against the occupation and for Palestine solidarity relates to how they participate within a broader struggle for justice. The way, for instance, that Jewish Voice for Peace and IfNotNow understand that they need to fight for the interconnectedness of all the sites of struggle. That they need to fight against homophobia in the US, and that this is absolutely related to the other questions that they’re talking about.

These movements also understand the necessity of focusing on discourse and narrative. They know they need to find ways of changing the story, changing perceptions, changing narratives. Because there is a broader realization on the part of the activists that they’re not only fighting to end the Israeli occupation that is happening in their name, but also, they need to transform the community. So thinking about how to do that really brings to the fore some humanistic engagements: art and very broad coalitions, and actual alternatives—imagined alternatives  

The Return of ‘Israeli Apartheid Week’ in 2022

17.02.22 

Editorial Note

Last week, the Palestinian BDS National Committee (BNC) announced the return of ‘Israeli Apartheid Week’ to the campuses and public spaces in 2022.  

The BDS movement’s website is maintained by the BNC, “the coalition of Palestinian organizations that leads and supports the BDS movement and by the Palestinian Campaign for the Academic and Cultural Boycott of Israel (PACBI), a BNC member organization.”

For the BNC, the Israeli Apartheid Week promotes the “struggle for freedom” and shares global experiences of “countering cultural erasure and cultural imperialism.”  


This year, the BNC plans to shed light on “the role of culture, and art in particular, in decolonizing our minds in our collective struggles against cultural appropriation and oppression.”

According to the BNC, Israeli Apartheid Week is a “tool for mobilizing grassroots support on the global level for the Palestinian struggle for justice. It is a grassroots mechanism to raise awareness about Israeli apartheid and to mobilize support for strategic BDS campaigns to help bring an end to this system of oppression.” 

It claims that the Israeli Apartheid Week provides an “opportunity to network and strengthen the links between the Palestinian liberation struggle and other struggles against racism, oppression, and discrimination. In 2022, as in every year since 2005, we will once again join our voices to denounce apartheid and celebrate our diversity… From March to April, communities around the globe will come together to organize inspiring actions and events to show that now, more than ever, we are #UnitedAgainstRacism.”

The BNC notes that “Despite decades of ruthless Israeli ethnic cleansing and brutal repression, Palestinians from all parts of historic Palestine, as well as in exile, took to the streets last May to challenge Israel’s regime of occupation, apartheid and settler colonialism.” As the Palestinians have “dismantled psychological colonial walls that divide us.”

The banner used this year is “United Against Racism,” to celebrate “cultures of resistance” and explore the “intersectional ties between the Palestinian liberation struggle and global struggles for justice.”   

The dates provided for the Israeli Apartheid Week 2022 are: Europe and North America 21 – 28 March; Africa from 21 March – 4 April; Asia-Pacific 28 March – 4 April; Latin America and Arab World (incl. Palestine) 11 – 18 April.

Global Rally Against Israeli Apartheid on March 26th. “On this day, we will be joined by artists from around the world centering art and culture as critical arenas of our collective resistance to Israeli apartheid and all forms of racism and oppression. From dance, to music, to poetry, the rally will highlight the critical role that culture and art play in decolonizing our minds. This rally comes as part of the Israeli Apartheid Week (IAW), which over the last 18 years has propelled discussion of Israeli apartheid and organizing for Boycott Divestment and Sanctions (BDS) campaigns into the popular narrative in order to help bring an end to this crime against humanity.”

The BNC announces, “Fighting oppression and apartheid requires liberated minds… Only Liberated Minds Can Dismantle Apartheid… with liberated minds and souls, we embark on a radical process of hopeful, globalized resistance, transformation, and emancipation.”

The BNC claims, “Israel as an apartheid state is becoming increasingly mainstream, and we are witnessing unprecedented support for the cultural and academic boycott of Israel. Apartheid Israel is realizing that its South Africa moment is nearing.”  

However, following the recent Amnesty International report accusing the Israeli authorities of enforcing apartheid policies, the US rejected this view. Ned Price, the State Department spokesperson, moved to “reject the view that Israel’s actions constitute apartheid. The Department’s own reports have never used such terminology.” Price also added that “it is important, as the world’s only Jewish state, that the Jewish people must not be denied their right to self-determination, and we must ensure there isn’t a double standard being applied.”

It is ironic that the Palestinians espouse slogans calling the “liberated minds” to fight oppression and apartheid and urging to perform a globalized resistance and emancipation.   While such slogans may appeal to the transectional crowd on the campuses, which is a coalition of racial, ethnic minorities and LGBTQ groups. Trying to mainstream the Israeli apartheid equivalency is a hard slog.  Amnesty International was harshly criticized for its double standards.  Critics have pointed out that human rights groups have disproportionately targeted Israel while keeping silent about egregious human rights violators.  This policy does not help the Palestinians who recently protested against their own authorities in the West Bank and Gaza.   The human rights community’s unique obsession with Israel hurts millions of victims worldwide in desperate need of advocacy.  

There are no campus activities published for the Israeli Apartheid Week yet. Once the program is announced, IAM would provide it to warn Jews and Israelis.

References:

https://bdsmovement.net/iaw

BDS

ISRAELI APARTHEID WEEK

#UnitedAgainstRacism 

ISRAELI APARTHEID WEEK

OVERVIEW

Israeli Apartheid Week (IAW) is a tool for mobilizing grassroots support on the global level for the Palestinian struggle for justice. It is a grassroots mechanism to raise awareness about Israeli apartheid and to mobilize support for strategic BDS campaigns to help bring an end to this system of oppression.

IAW provides an opportunity to network and strengthen the links between the Palestinian liberation struggle and other struggles against racism, oppression, and discrimination. In 2022, as in every year since 2005, we will once again join our voices to denounce apartheid and celebrate our diversity. This year, we plan to shed light on the role of culture, and art in particular, in decolonizing our minds in our collective struggles against cultural appropriation and oppression. From March to April, communities around the globe will come together to organize inspiring actions and events to show that now, more than ever, we are #UnitedAgainstRacism. 

IAW Region                            IAW Dates
Europe21-28 March
North America21-28 March
Africa21 March – 4 April
Asia-Pacific28 March – 4 April
Latin America11 – 18 April
Arab World (incl. Palestine)11 – 18 April

To host an event for IAW in your community, fill out this form to register it with the International Coordinating Committee.Stay tuned for IAW program updates, including the registration link for our global Rally Against Israeli Apartheid on March 26th!

All Israeli Apartheid Week (IAW) activities must conform to the BDS movement’s anti-racist principles and respect its affiliation guidelines.

2022 CALL OUT

Only Liberated Minds Can Dismantle Apartheid 

“We are reminded that just as we fought together to defeat apartheid in South Africa, we need to forcefully challenge Israeli apartheid as it is deployed against the Palestinian people today.” – Angela Davis

Fighting oppression and apartheid requires liberated minds. This year, we plan to shed light on the role of culture, and art in particular, in decolonizing our minds in our collective struggles against cultural appropriation and oppression. 

Under the banner United Against Racism, Israeli Apartheid Week (IAW) this year celebrates cultures of resistance, exploring the intersectional ties between the Palestinian liberation struggle and global struggles for justice. In IAW, we promote BDS campaigning as the most effective form of solidarity with our struggle for freedom, and we share global experiences in countering cultural erasure and cultural imperialism. 

This year, we are taking our actions back to the streets, campuses, and community spaces, wherever health and safety conditions allow. 

Despite decades of ruthless Israeli ethnic cleansing and brutal repression, Palestinians from all parts of historic Palestine, as well as in exile, took to the streets last May to challenge Israel’s regime of occupation, apartheid and settler colonialism. In the process, we have dismantled psychological colonial walls that divide us. 

Simultaneously, the recognition of Israel as an apartheid state is becoming increasingly mainstream, and we are witnessing unprecedented support for the cultural and academic boycott of Israel. Apartheid Israel is realizing that its South Africa moment is nearing.

More than two years of pandemic have revealed and worsened the existing global inequalities and destructive forces of racial capitalism, militarism, surveillance and other tools of oppression. Yet, affirming their profound aspiration for emancipation, communities have continued to resiliently resist oppression and struggle for social, racial, gender, economic and climate justice. They’ve insisted on freedom and dignity for all, building networks of people power and international solidarity across cultures and borders with inspiring creativity.

In this IAW, with liberated minds and souls, we embark on a radical process of hopeful, globalized resistance, transformation, and emancipation.

This year, IAW will take place between March 21st – April 18th across the globe, as we will be organizing a series of on-the-ground actions and online events. 

2022 GLOBAL RALLY

Save the date for the 2022 Global Rally Against Israeli Apartheid on Saturday, March 26th at 10AM EST / 3PM GMT / 5PM Palestine!

On this day, we will be joined by artists from around the world centering art and culture as critical arenas of our collective resistance to Israeli apartheid and all forms of racism and oppression. From dance, to music, to poetry, the rally will highlight the critical role that culture and art play in decolonizing our minds. 

This rally comes as part of the Israeli Apartheid Week (IAW), which over the last 18 years has propelled discussion of Israeli apartheid and organizing for Boycott Divestment and Sanctions (BDS) campaigns into the popular narrative in order to help bring an end to this crime against humanity. 
This year, from March to April, communities around the globe will come together to organize inspiring IAW actions and events to show that now, more than ever, we are #UnitedAgainstRacism. For more information on Israeli Apartheid Week check out the website here.

This website is maintained by the Palestinian BDS National Committee (BNC), the coalition of Palestinian organisations that leads and supports the BDS movement and by the Palestinian Campaign for the Academic and Cultural Boycott of Israel (PACBI), a BNC member organisation.

TAU Prof. Gadi Algazi and the Bedouin Village al-Arakib

10.02.22

Editorial Note

A recent Haaretz article discusses findings of History Professor Gadi Algazi of Tel Aviv University on the issue of Bedouins in the Negev. 

Algazi is a specialist in the social and intellectual history of European Judaism. His latest academic work pertains to the Mutina Hebraica Project which, “proposes a dialogue between the digital humanities, the history of knowledge and Jewish history,” using new archival investigations and the development of computer tools for the automated reading of manuscripts by applying artificial intelligence to the analysis of texts.

Outside observers may be puzzled why a professor of the history of European Jewry should present himself as an expert on Israeli Bedouins. But Algazi is part of a group of activists who uses his academic perch to advocate for issues outside his academic field. He was hired to teach and research in his field of expertise then switched to political activism disguised as academics.  According to the article, Algazi provided an expert report to the Israeli court.

The illogic of Algazi is glaring. There are two problems with the article, Algazi discusses a letter written by the South Commander, General Moshe Dayan, who raised the possibility of moving Bedouins and compensating them. Algazi then moves to juxtapose the court case of al-Arakib (Araqib), where the Bedouin claimants failed to prove ownership, as the Supreme Court dismissed the case in 2015. Clearly, Algazi has an agenda, by connecting Moshe Dayan’s memo on moving Bedouins from one place to another – not particularly the al-Arakib Bedouins – to the claimants’ lack of proof of ownership and the shacks they built that have been destroyed hundreds of times by the police. 

The article purports to influence another Bedouin court case, as it states, something the Israeli public would consider unethical.

The al-Arakib court case pertains to the Bedouins’ efforts to establish ownership of approx. 2000 dunam.  Their case was rejected because the claimants failed to prove they cultivated such a large territory of the so-called Mewat Land, a land which under the rules of the Ottoman Empire could not be owned. Their ownership was neither established under the British Mandate nor later by Israel. Had the claimants claimed a land size they could cultivate, their case might have been accepted.

As the article indicates, Forensic Architecture provided the digital imaging of al-Arakib, headed by another anti-Israel Israeli activist, Prof. Eyal Weizman, from Goldsmiths University of London. Still, no imaging can provide a continuous presence in al-Arakib. Bedouins are nomadic and roam many areas during a year.  

In the verdict of the al-Arakib case by the Supreme Court in 2015, Aref Al-Aref, a historian and governor of the Beer Sheva District during the British Mandate period, was cited. He wrote in 1933, “The Bedouin had extended periods of time during which they had no interest whatsoever in land. Moreover, they looked down on anyone connected with working the land, because they perceived that as a disruption and a distraction to the life of wandering and brigandage. It is possible that the foundation of their hatred of farmers and their lifestyle can be found here. However, at present [1933] the situation has changed and the Bedouin have begun leaning towards agriculture.” 

Algazi is an academic with a pro-Palestinian agenda. As such, he is not a neutral researcher.

Algazi has a long history of political activism. IAM published a post last year identifying Algazi as Israel’s first conscript objector who wrote in 2001 a chapter that praises draft dodging. Moreover, the Netherlands radio program “Vox Humana” interviewed Algazi, who said, “At the age of 12, he had already decided that he would refuse the inevitable military service in the occupied territories that would eventually be expected of him. And at 18, when he became the first Israeli to publicly refuse to serve there, he was used as an example by the establishment. For years, every time he was called up for service and refused, he was imprisoned.” 

While it is his right to have an opinion or refuse army service and face the consequences, his academic career would not have been possible without the strong support of several backers. Possibly, one of them was the late Leon Sheleff, a professor of law and sociology at Tel Aviv University whom Algazi thanked at the end of the draft-dodging chapter.   An obituary of Sheleff in Haaretz in 2003 stated that “Professor Sheleff was a moral and conscientious man who specialized in the relation between law and society,” a close colleague said. “The South African born Sheleff was a member of the Habonim, a socialist-Zionist movement, who became a passionate peace advocate upon immigrating to Israel.  He wrote a book dealing with the circumstances in which refusing military service is possible.”  It would not be beyond the realm of imagination to assume that Sheleff helped Algazi, the celebrated draft dodger, to obtain his position at Tel Aviv University. 

Another possible backer is Gerardo Leibner, a professor in the Department of History at TAU.  A highly activist academic who became involved in the Israeli-Palestinian conflict.

In 2002 Algazi and Leibner submitted an article to a Palestinian anti-Israel propaganda outlet based in Ramallah. They detailed how they and their friends support the Palestinians and oppose Israel. 

In the recent article on the Bedouins, Algazi minimizes the Army’s concerns about the radicalization of the Bedouin community.  It is well known that Palestinians have tried to destabilize the situation in the Negev, a situation that would impose new security challenges.   For example, The New Arab newspaper based in London reported on February 01, 2022, that “Historical archive reveals Israel’s plans to expel Negev Palestinians.” Another pro-Palestinian media outlet, Middle East Eye, published an article on January 31, 2022, “Historical documents reveal Israel’s plan to empty Negev of Palestinians.”   This new propaganda line aims to persuade the Bedouins that they share the same fate as the Palestinians. 

Turning the Bedouin community into a “mini Palestine” is a major concern for Israel’s security, but for pro-Palestinian Algazi, Israel’s interests are not on the agenda.

References

https://www.haaretz.com/israel-news/.premium.MAGAZINE-documents-reveal-israel-s-intent-to-forcibly-expel-bedouin-from-their-lands-1.10579891
Documents Reveal Israel’s Intent to Forcibly Expel the Bedouin From Their Lands

Published by “If Americans Knew

1951 Documents Reveal Israel’s Intent to Ethnically Cleanse Bedouin from their Lands

 CONTACT@IFAMERICANSKNEW.ORG FEBRUARY 8, 2022

New research has uncovered an Israeli military operation commanded by Moshe Dayan, whose goal was to forcibly remove Bedouin Palestinians from their lands. ‘Transferring the Bedouin to new territories would annul their rights as landowners and make them tenants on government lands,’ wrote Dayan in 1951. The documents show an orderly state expulsion plan…

Israel has evicted the Bedouin from the Negev village of Al-Arakib dozens of times, but they keep coming back. Israeli forces then demolish their homes again

To a large extent, Al-Arakib’s story is that of the entire Negev Bedouin community. Israel doesn’t recognize as theirs the tens of thousands of dunams they once lived on and where they still live…

By Netael Bandel, reposted from Ha’aretz (video below translated and added by IAK)

It’s quiet in the unrecognized Negev Bedouin village of Al-Arakib. It was even quiet a month ago, when stormy protests against the Jewish National Fund’s tree planting were taking place some 30 kilometers away.

But another issue could prove even more explosive, perhaps much more. And it stems from this quiet village.

At first glance, there’s nothing special about what Justice Ministry officials are calling the “national strategy case.” It’s just another Bedouin lawsuit over ownership of Negev lands that the state expropriated after the 1948 War of Independence.

Bedouin have testified previously that soldiers forcibly expelled them. For the first time, however, Algazi’s research seems to provide evidence of an orderly state expulsion plan

It will most likely fail in court, just like all its predecessors. And the Justice Ministry thinks it will be the last of its kind – that the state’s victory in this case would preclude any further Bedouin suits.

However, an appendix to this suit might change the outcome, albeit unlikely. It’s an opinion by Prof. Gadi Algazi, a historian from Tel Aviv University. His in-depth research has uncovered a military operation commanded by Moshe Dayan whose goal, the documents show, was to forcibly expel Bedouin from their lands.

“Transferring the Bedouin to new areas will revoke their rights as landowners and the land will be leased as government land,” wrote Dayan, then head of the army’s Southern Command, in a letter Algazi discovered. And a document written by the military government predicted that if the Bedouin, who refused to leave, didn’t move voluntarily, the army “would have to move them,” Algazi’s opinion added.

The Justice Ministry still thinks this case will end like all the others. Nevertheless, there’s a chance this historical material could set a legal precedent with implications far beyond recognizing Bedouin ownership of this one village.

What’s left of Al-Arakib is easy to reach. Head south on Route 40, turn right after the Lehavim Junction and you’ll see what looks like ruins. An ancient cemetery may be the clearest evidence of the life still here. At the moment, there’s a tent and two vans here. One van serves more as shelter from the weather than as a means of transportation.

The state has already evicted the Bedouin from Al-Arakib’s roughly 2,000 dunams dozens of times, but they keep coming back and reassemble. Israel then demolishes their homes again.

To a large extent, Al-Arakib’s story is that of the entire Negev Bedouin community. The state doesn’t recognize as theirs the tens of thousands of dunams they once lived on and where they still live.

‘The research proves that what David Ben-Gurion explicitly denied in the Knesset actually happened, and how. There was an organized transfer of Bedouin citizens’

Officially, the Bedouin left during the war and didn’t return, so the state expropriated the land. Then, the Land Acquisition Law of 1953 made this situation permanent. The law states that expropriated land would become state property if its Arab owners, despite still living in Israel, didn’t return to it between May 15, 1948 and April 1, 1952, and if the land was expropriated for “essential development needs” and still served those needs.

The state expropriated 247,000 dunams in the Negev, but 66,000 of them remain unutilized to this day. That underutilization has sparked a wave of Bedouin lawsuits, but the courts have rejected them time after time.

“Given the unique nature of the Acquisition Law and the unique historical circumstances leading to its enactment, there’s no room today for challenging the constitutionality of the expropriations carried out under it,” the Supreme Court wrote in three separate rulings. In one, then-Justice Asher Grunis wrote that even though the courts have authority to hear all these cases, “the decision, practically speaking, is largely moot.”

Nevertheless, “largely” isn’t the same as “always,” especially since the Bedouin are now raising a new argument – that the expropriation itself was illegal. Granted, Bedouin have testified previously that soldiers forcibly expelled them. For the first time, however, Algazi’s research seems to provide evidence of an orderly state expulsion plan.

‘Move away for a little while’

Ismail Mohammed Salem Abu Madiam was born in Al-Arakib in 1939, a scion of a family that had lived there for many years. They grew various crops, including wheat, barley and corn. They also raised camels, horses, donkeys and sheep. When he was a child, during the British Mandate, he would go to Be’er Sheva with his uncle to sell the sheep.

“I was 9 when the war broke out in 1948,” he said in an affidavit to the court. “We feared attacks by the army, so the neighbors’ families moved to our plot to be less vulnerable. They returned to their lands when the end ended.”

When he was 14, he said, the military governor came to the village to speak with his grandfather. “He ordered us to move away for a little while. We were told the army was planning maneuvers in the area and we could come back afterward.”

‘I scrolled down the screen in the archive and the file got stuck on page 999. It was probably just a simple technical error – somebody didn’t think there’d be files any longer than that’

They were moved to a site around 300 meters from their land. They eventually returned to Al-Arakib and he bought a house in Rahat, not far from his family’s lands.

“Throughout this period, I never knew the state claimed that the land wasn’t ours or that it had been expropriated,” he said. But when the repeated evictions began, he and other villagers realized that the state viewed the land as no longer theirs.

Over the past decade, Al-Arakib has become the standard bearer for the Bedouin’ fight for recognized ownership of Negev lands. The state has evicted the residents – who consider themselves the owners but are called squatters – dozens of times.

The narrow opening left by Grunis’ ruling encouraged the Abu Madiam and Abu Freih families now to sue for ownership of Al-Arakib’s 2,000 dunams. They are represented in the Be’er Sheva District Court by attorneys Michael Sfard and Carmel Pomerantz.

Another local tribe filed a similar petition and lost, but that petition lacked Algazi’s findings.

“Even if we don’t win, heaven forbid, I’ve achieved my goal,” said Dr. Awad Abu Freih, the head Sapir College’s biotechnology department and the lead plaintiff. “The history has been told, and also written. My story, that of my father and my grandfather, won. This isn’t just another case, just another name. This is Al-Arakib, which has insisted on continuing to live and refused to die, even if they buried us alive.”

Algazi’s research reveals for the first time the large-scale operation to evict the Bedouin and move them elsewhere in the Negev that Southern Command launched in November 1951, with approval from Chief of Staff Yigael Yadin. The eviction had security justifications, but it also had another goal – severing the Bedouin’s ties with their lands.

“The research proves that what David Ben-Gurion explicitly denied in the Knesset actually happened, and how,” Algazi told Haaretz, referring to Israel’s first prime minister. “There was an organized transfer of Bedouin citizens from the northwestern Negev eastward to barren areas, with the goal of taking over their lands. They carried out this operation using a mix of threats, violence, bribery and fraud.”

Letter from Moshe Dayan, the head of the Southern Command, to the deputy chief of staff, dated Sept. 25, 1951.Letter from Moshe Dayan, the head of the Southern Command, to the deputy chief of staff, dated Sept. 25, 1951.

He said his opinion shows how the operation was carried out, down to the level of the notes exchanged by military government officers implementing it. The most senior of them knew it was an illegal operation, and that’s why it was important to them not to give the Bedouin written “transfer” orders, he added.

Another discovery was “the Bedouin resistance and protests, the stubbornness with which they tried to hold onto their land, even at the cost of hunger and thirst, not to mention the army’s threats and violence,” he said. Yet another finding was the way the official story was drafted. “It shows how they censored and edited the reports step by step, until the version in which the Bedouin moved ‘voluntarily’ was accepted,” Algazi said.

For years, Algazi has been an active participant in the Bedouin’s struggle in general and in that of Al-Arakib’s residents in particular. He began his current research in 2011 by delving into documents in the archives of the Defense Ministry and the Negev kibbutzim. “I had heard things and wanted to see if there was any truth to them,” he explained.

“I found a treasure trove in the kibbutzim’s archives. Sometimes I found myself with an archivist who had devoted years to collecting and organizing the material. Other times I was simply sent to dig through an old cupboard. But in any case, I never imaged this would gradually turn into research that would keep me busy for eight years.”

Algazi’s research led to the letter Dayan sent to the General Staff on September 25, 1951. “It’s now possible to transfer most of the Bedouin in the vicinity of [Kibbutz] Shoval to areas south of the Hebron-Be’er Sheva road,” he wrote. “Doing so will clear around 60,000 dunams in which we can farm and establish communities. After this transfer, there will be no Bedouin north of the Hebron-Be’er Sheva road.”

Dayan raised security considerations in favor of moving the Bedouin to the area of the Jordanian border, but security was not the only consideration. “Transferring the Bedouin to new territories will annul their rights as landowners and they will become tenants on government lands.” Dayan made a similar statement a year earlier, in June 1950, during a meeting of Mapai. “The party’s policy should be aimed at seeing this community of 170,000 Arabs as if their fate has yet to be sealed. I hope that in the coming years, we will be able to transfer these Arabs out of the Land of Israel.” A year after expressing this aspiration, the documents reveal, he partially executed his plan, moving them within but not outside the state’s borders.

Dayan’s letter was not easy to find, says Algazi. “In November 2017, a huge, disorganized file of correspondence of the military government, containing 1037 pages, was released for viewing,” he recalls. “The scanned file was once a big fat, disorderly folder lying on a dusty shelf somewhere full of correspondence, some interesting, some boring. I scrolled down the screen in the archive and the file got stuck on page 999. It was probably just a simple technical error – somebody didn’t think there’d be files any longer than that.”

Algazi was told the file would be fixed. Two years later, he was informed it was. “Dayan’s letter turned up in the final 40 pages along with another two parts of the correspondence that completed the missing puzzle pieces,” he recalls. “I was sitting in the archives, and I could hear Dayan speaking. In his unique style, he said openly things that others would wrap in cellophane paper: ‘Transferring the Bedouin to new territories would annul their rights as landowners and make them tenants on government lands.’ Clear and simple.”

But, adds Algazi, the cunning Dayan, in charge of Southern Command, thought he had managed to arrange the transfer with the Bedouin’s agreement and was making sure not to explain exactly how he achieved that agreement. “Dayan cooked it up, and it failed,” he says. “When it transpired that there was no agreement, the pressure and violence began. Indeed, right after Dayan’s letter, I found in the same file a report by the military government concerning the Bedouin’s refusal to move – and what needs to be done to meet the goal.” This time, the author is the acting military governor of the Negev, Major Moshe Bar-On. He wrote: “We received orders from the head of Southern Command to pressure the Bedouin tribes in the northern region, even going so far as to say that if they don’t move of their own free will, the army will be forced to move them.”

The means of ‘persuasion’

There were many means of persuasion, but some of the information remains censored. For example, Maj. Misha Hanegbi described in his report on November 21, 1951, a patrol in the region that was aimed at “hastening” the transfer of Bedouin when it ran into “stiff resistance from the locals to leaving their lands.” The report stated that only “after negotiations” was the transfer carried out. However, an entire paragraph is then blacked out – one that could shed light on the means used to “persuade.”

However, testimonies submitted by locals as court affidavits reveal some details. “I remember how the army ordered my family to leave Al-Arakib and head northward,” recalls 80-year-old Hussein Ibrahim Hussein. “Some people who resisted the deportation were arrested. We were told the lands were being confiscated for a few months for military purposes. The Military Police turned up, tied up our things, and told them to move.” They moved but tried to return. It didn’t end well. “I was arrested. My uncle was arrested, we were all arrested” he states. “We would go in to see, the army would detain us for a day or two and then release us.”

Not everyone in the military supported the operation. The Negev governor, Lt. Col. Michael Hanegbi, wrote to the chiefs of staff that “the presence of the Bedouin in the area serves as a buffer against attacks by infiltrators from the east against our settlements along that line. The fact is that our settlements in this area hardly suffer from attacks, which are very frequent in other areas.” He also warned that the alternative lands designated for the Bedouin were barren and that “the problem of water is the eastern region was getting worse.” On another occasion, Hanegbi reported that “despite restrictions prohibiting the use of violence, attempts were made, with the agreement of command, to try and force them to move.” He added: “A military government unit took down a number of tents and loaded them on to a vehicle. The tent owners did not leave and did not join their families who had been transferred.”

Additional testimonies to events were received from residents of nearby kibbutzim. The area “was surrounded by police and military government in military vehicles,” Yosef Tzur of Kibbutz Shuval wrote to kibbutz movement leaders. “People fled, tents were taken down and those who were caught were piled into vehicles and taken to Tel Arad.” A little of what happened when the uniformed officers turned up was revealed by Sheikh Suleiman Al-Okbi in an interview with Yedioth Aharonoth in 1975. “Military units began turning up on our lands from time to time and they would shoot in the air,” he told Yedioth. “People were scared and the women were frightened to work in the field and graze the animals.”

Lieutenant Colonel Hanegbi wrote in one of his letters that “the transfers were conducted primarily through persuasion and economic pressure.” He went on to reveal more. “We had no legal foundation and we were also under orders not to use force, so we had to behave cautiously in our actions and without becoming entangled in legal problems.”

Algazi found evidence of this economic pressure in a note written by the prime minister’s advisor on Arab affairs back then, Yehoshua Palmon (who, the researcher says, was “the most senior figure in setting policy toward Israel’s Arab citizens”). Palmon wrote that the military government prevented the Bedouin from sowing their lands to pressure them into agreeing to move. There was evidence of this practice on the ground. Kibbutz Shuval wrote to the Mapam Party on January 28, 1952, that “the military government forced the Bedouin to leave their lands. Their food supplies were stopped.” According to the kibbutz residents, food supplies were stopped over a period of months.

Other methods of harassing the Bedouin were employed according to an affidavit submitted to the courts by Hussein Ibrahim al-Touri, who was born in 1942. He described how the military “would come and harass us, take us to prison, and so on.” He stated: “The soldiers would take a rope, tie a tent to a command car and demolish it. We were told to move and that if we were to return they would burn our homes down and take us to Jordan.” Abed Hasin Abu-Sakut, a fellow villager, said that after leaving their lands, they returned occasionally, but then “the soldiers would shoot or arrest us and fine us.”

They didn’t just return to their lands of their own accords. Algazi says the state gave the Bedouin the impression they were only being temporarily evacuated. In a letter from the time, Captain Avraham Shemesh wrote that he had allowed evacuated Bedouin to return from time to time to work the soil “until the Beni Okba tribe was allowed to return to its lands.” According to the testimony of local Bedouin similar statements were repeatedly made to them. “The elders said the military governor gave my uncle a letter saying that the army needs the land for six months, after which we would return,” Ahmad Salam Mahmoud al-Okbi testified in court. “I remember how a year after the deportation in 1951, my uncle returned to the land with others. I was there and grazed sheep. One day, a military officer by the name of Sasson Bar Zvi who I knew turned up. He said that if we didn’t leave, he would take us to jail.”

The document reveals that the area kibbutzim raised objections on several occasions to the policy. In late 1951, Kibbutz Mishmar Hanegev, Kibbutz Shuval and Kibbutz Safiach (Beit Kama) wrote a letter to the Foreign Affairs and Defense Committee protesting the transfer of Bedouin, arguing that they helped settlement.

“We felt a duty to emphasize that this was being done through conspiracy, bribery, and pressure,” they wrote, reporting that “some tents were moved by force.” The kibbutzim’s protest led Mapan to investigate the matter in November 1952. Lieutenant Colonel Hanegbi testified that he had only carried out the orders given him, but confirmed that the army’s intention was to “undermine the status of the tribes being transferred, so they would leave the country.” As part of the operation, he said, “scare tactics and bribery were used, but not always.” Hanegbi contended that military personnel had behaved “cruelly and crudely” toward the Bedouin. As a result, a recommendation was made to annul his party membership.

Algazi says that while there have been a number of studies in recent year about the period of military rule, “there was no study or affirmation until today that the 1951 deportation took place.”

A matter of timing

Throughout the hearings, the state and the prosecution did not deny the operation’s existence but argued that against Algazi’s opinion emphasized the civilian considerations of the transfer while playing down the security considerations. The state also raised a claim concerning the operation’s timetable. They argued that operation began before the law was passed, so Dayan could not have known what criteria would be set for seizing land. However, some could argue that Dayan possibly knew about long-term political plans because of his position and standing.

Another issue concerns how long Al-Arakib has existed. The state denied the claim that there was a permanent settlement on Al-Arakib’s lands. The petitioners assert there had been a Bedouin settlement at the site prior to the state’s establishment, based on an opinion provided by Forensic Architecture, a research group at the University of London. Forensic Architecture, headed by Prof. Eyal Weizman, combined digital tools with maps and reconnaissance of Al-Arakib to reach that conclusion. The opinion will take on greater significance if the claimants manage to progress to the second stage of the hearing on proof of ownership.

The state argues the court should reject the claim due to a delay of decades in filing it. But the Bedouin also have a response for that: They were never told the lands were appropriated and the state misled them into thinking the lands had been taken away only temporarily. A letter received in 2000 from the Israel Lands Administration stated that “no appropriation has taken place” on the lands.

One way or the other, all parties are waiting to hear from the court. Meanwhile, Algazi expects to make further findings. “The difficulty is in reconstructing an operation carried out by people who knew it was not really legal, and therefore made sure not to put down certain things in writing,” he tells Haaretz. “In addition, although we are talking about events that took place 70 years ago, only some of the documents have been revealed. We are waiting for the day when we will be able to study all of them.”

****

Netael Bandel is an attorney who writes for Ha’aretz

==========================================

https://english.alaraby.co.uk/news/archive-reveals-israels-plans-expel-negev-palestinians
Historical archive reveals Israel’s plans to expel Negev Palestinians

MENA2 min read
The New Arab Staff
01 February, 2022
Newly researched documents dating back to 1951 support Palestinian Bedouins’ claims to lands in the Negev Desert, where protests have been going on for the past month over lands targeted for seizure.

Newly studied archives showing Israel’s intention to forcibly displace thousands of Palestinians from the Negev Desert (also known as the Naqab) could help Bedouins claim back their lands, Israeli media reported on Monday.

Professor Gadi Algazi, a historian from Tel Aviv University, uncovered archives documenting a 1951 Israeli military operation to forcibly expel Palestinian Bedouins from their lands in the Negev, a large desert historically inhabited and cultivated by Bedouin tribes.  

The archival materials were originally released in 2017.  

They include a letter written by Moshe Dayan, then head of the Israeli army’s Southern Command, and a document written by the military government in the area. According to Algazi’s research, the two documents prove the army’s intention to forcibly move the Bedouins from their lands in order to seize them.

“There was an organized transfer of Bedouin citizens from the northwestern Negev eastward to barren areas, with the goal of taking over their lands. They carried out this operation using a mix of threats, violence, bribery and fraud,” Algazi told the Israeli daily Haaretz.

Some believe the documents could shift the balance in favour of displaced Negev Palestinians in various lawsuits against the Israeli government, and create a legal precedent.

Bedouins from the Negev have testified for years that Israeli soldiers expelled them but this is the first time historical research provides evidence of an orderly state expulsion plan.

Israel’s official stand on the Negev is that Palestinian Bedouins left their land following Israel’s 1948 declaration of independence, and never returned.

Known as the Nakba – or Catastrophe – by Palestinians, this dramatic event witnessed the flight of hundreds of thousands of Palestinians from massacres committed by Zionist militias, who seized their villages and towns.

In 1953, Israel passed laws expropriating all land whose owners had been absent and not returned by April 1952, effectively seizing the property of Palestinians who left during the Nakba.

The new archival revelations come as protests continue in the Negev against an afforestation plan led by the controversial Jewish National Fund (JNF), a quasi-state organ whose aim is to buy a maximum amount of land on behalf of Israeli Jews. The protests began in early January.

The Israeli Land Authority assigned some 1,300,000 square metres of land belonging to a Bedouin tribe to the JNF, with 370,000 square metres being allocated for forest planting.

Several protests have taken place across Palestine in solidarity with Negev residents. The latest one took place on Sunday in Jerusalem.

Israeli forces have arrested dozens of activists and demonstrators, including several children, since the start of their campaign to “Save the Negev”.

================================================

 https://www.middleeasteye.net/news/israel-negev-palestinians-empty-plans-revealed-new-documentsHistorical documents reveal Israel’s plan to empty Negev of Palestinians

Documents cited in a legal challenge against the Israeli government acknowledge that officials knew operation was ‘illegal’ post-1948

By MEE staff
Published date: 31 January 2022 17:02 UTC | Last update: 5 days 18 hours ago

Newly unearthed Israeli historical records reveal officials’ relentless efforts to forcibly empty Palestinian lands of their Bedouin inhabitants in the Negev during the 1950s.

Haaretz reported that the records were revealed as part of a legal case over land ownership pursued by Palestinian citizens of Israel in al-Araqeeb, one of the dozens of villages deemed illegal by Israel and barred from water, electricity and transportation services, among others.

Araqeeb was demolished 197 times by Israel, which seized its lands, and its Palestinian inhabitants have long challenged the Israeli government in courts over the issue.

Haaretz reported on Monday that the Israeli government is considering the case as of “national strategic” importance to set the bar of other lawsuits filed by Palestinian citizens of Israel contesting the confiscation of their lands.

However, Araqeeb’s case has been followed with an opinion and appendix by Gadi Algazi, an Israeli history professor at Tel Aviv University, who spent the past eight years studying the government memos, records and letters regarding the Negev, the largest region in the country.

Algazi had revealed documents as part of the legal case of numerous plans to push Palestinians, who remained in what became Israel after the 1948 war, out of their lands.

A military operation was set up by Moshe Dayan, the southern region commander, in November 1951 to kick out Palestinian Bedouins from areas in the northwest of the Negev to the east and from north of Hebron-Beer Sheva road to the south of it.

This would turn Palestinians who became citizens of Israel into tenants.

“The transfer of the Bedouins to new territories will nullify their right as landowners and they will be [treated] as tenants of government lands,” Dayan wrote in a letter, first reported by Haaretz.

Dayan’s plan was then approved by Israel’s army chief of staff Yigael Yadin, which also suggested that if the Palestinians were not “voluntarily transferred”, the Israeli fledgling forces would “be forced to transfer them” and forcibly remove them from their lands.

Officials at Israel’s Ministry of Justice believe that Araqeeb’s case would end like its predecessor, in other words, in favour of the government. Still, these historical documents unearthed by Algazi could have legal implications, Haaretz said.

The village of Araqeeb spread over 200 dunams (200,000 square metres), and what remained of it, which Israel continuously demolished, has been rebuilt repeatedly.

Palestinian lands in Araqeeb were seized, like many other villages, according to the 1953 Land Acquisition Law.

Israel said that lands in the Negev, which Palestinian owners did live on between 15 May 1948 and 1 April 1952, belonged to the Israeli government that had expropriated 247,000 dunams in the Negev.

The new historical records reveal that Palestinians in that period were forcibly deported by Israeli forces deploying threats, violence, bribery and fraud, Haaretz reported.

‘Discrimination and neglect’

Algazi told Haaretz that senior Israeli officials knew that the operation to deport Palestinians from the Negev was “illegal”, thus they avoided giving them “written eviction orders”.

He also said that the records attested to a resistance undertaken by Palestinian Bedouins against the Israeli plan to move them out of their lands.

“[It was] a revelation the stubbornness with which they tried to hold on to their land, even at the cost of hunger and thirst, not to mention threats and military violence,” Algazi told Haaretz.

In recent weeks, hundreds of Palestinian citizens of Israel in the Negev have protested against a forestation plan in their villages led by the Jewish National Fund (JNF), which they see as a way to deprive them of their lands.

On Sunday, almost 200 of them demonstrated outside Israeli Prime Minister Naftali Bennett’s office in Jerusalem against the plan, calling it a “policy of discrimination and neglect”.

About 300,000 Palestinian citizens live in the Negev; 100,000 live in 35 unrecognised villages and lack essential public services

================================================

The Supreme Court sitting as a Civil Appeals Court

CA 4220/12

Before:                                      The Honorable Deputy President E. Rubinstein

                                                  The Honorable Justice S. Joubran

                                                  The Honorable Justice E. Hayut

The Appellants:                        1.       The Late Saliman Muhammed Al-Uqbi

                                                  2.       Saeed Ali Al-Uqbi

                                                  3.       Majed Ali Saliman Al-Uqbi

                                                  4.       Maher Ali Al-Uqbi

                                                  5.       Fatma Al-Navari Al-Uqbi

                                                  6.       Noel Al-Aasem Al-Uqbi

                                                  7.       Dalal Al-Uqbi

                                                  8.       Tamam Al-Uqbi

                                                  9.       Raja Al-Uqbi

                                                  10.     Khasan (Nouri) Saliman Al-Uqbi

                                                  11.     Anwar Saliman Al-Uqbi

                                                  12.     Ibrahim Saliman Al-Uqbi

                                                  13.     Saeed Saliman Al-Uqbi

                                                  14.     Khalil Saliman Al-Uqbi

                                                  15.     Rakhab Saliman Al-Uqbi

                                                  16.     Khalma Saliman Al-Uqbi

                                                      v e r s u s

The Respondent:                     The State of Israel

Appeal on the judgment of the Beer Sheva District Court in CC 7161/06, CC 7275/06, CC 7276/06, CC 1114/07, CC 1115/07 and CC 5278/08, that was delivered on March 15, 2012 by the Honorable Deputy President S. Dovrat

Date of Session:                                   4th of Sivan, 5774 (June 2, 2014)

On behalf of the Appellants:  Adv. Michael Sefarad; Adv. Adar Grayevsky

On behalf of the Respondent: Adv. Moshe Golan; Adv. Havatzelet Yahel

J U D G M E N T

Justice E. Hayut:

An appeal on the judgment of the Beer Sheva District Court (the Honorable Deputy President S. Dovrat) dated March 15, 2012. The judgment was delivered in a consolidated manner for six land settlement cases (CC 7161/06, CC 7275/06, CC 7276/06, CC 1114/07, CC 1115/07 and CC 5278/08) and denied the Appellants’ claims of ownership of various land lots in the northern Negev, and accepted the State’s claim that the ownership of such lots should be registered in its name and in the name of the Development Authority.

The Background and the District Court’s Judgment

1.      In 1971 a land settlement proceeding, pursuant to the Land Rights Settlement [New Version] Ordinance, 5729-1969 (hereinafter: the “Settlement Ordinance“), began with respect to lands in the Northern Negev. In the framework of this proceeding, Appellant 1 claimed ownership of three land lots south of Rahat (known as Araqib 2, Araqib 6 and Araqib 60) and of three land lots north of Netivot (known as Sharia 132, Sharia 133 and Sharia 134) (hereinafter: the “Araqib Lots” and the “Sharia Lots“, respectively, and jointly, the “Lots“). The State, for its part, also claimed ownership of said Lots, and in its claim primarily relied on the fact that the Lots are located within the boundaries of the blocks in that area which had been expropriated in their entirety in 1954 by virtue of the Acquisition of Land (Confirmation of Deeds and Compensations) Law, 5713-1953 (hereinafter: the “Acquisition Law“). The settlement proceeding, which relates, inter alia, to the discussed Lots, was not completed for many years, and in 2006, Appellant 1’s heirs (Appellants 2-16) filed six claims to the court of first instance, in which they petitioned that they be declared owners of the Lots and that the Lots be registered in their name.

2.      The six claims were consolidated and, as stated in its judgment dated March 15, 2102, the court of first instance rejected these claims with instructions that the blocks in which these Lots, among others, are located, be registered in the name of the State and the Development Authority (Blocks numbered 400367, 400369, 400371, 400526 and 400527). The court first examined the validity of the expropriation executed by the State in 1954 pursuant to the Acquisition Law. Upon rejecting a series of arguments raised by the Appellants against the validity of such expropriation, the court concluded that the expropriation was lawfully performed, and that the Appellants’ claim survey, in which they claimed ownership of the Lots, should be rejected. However, the court of first instance ruled, in reliance upon the case-law that was adjudicated in CA 4067/07 Jabareen v. The State of Israel (January 3, 2010) (hereinafter: the “Jabareen Case”), that the fact of a valid expropriation does not nullify the need to address the matter of the rights, if any, held by Appellants prior to the expropriation, in order to rule regarding any compensation deriving therefrom. In addressing this matter, the court of first instance analyzed the provisions of the Land Law, 5729-1969 (hereinafter: the “Land Law“), including Sections 152-156 of the Law, and ruled that the main acts of legislation upon which the matter of the rights held by the Appellants prior to the 1954 expropriation should be examined, are: The Ottoman Land Code of 1274 to the Hijra (1858) (hereinafter: the “Ottoman Land Code” or the “Land Code “) and the (Mewat) Land Ordinance, 1921 (hereinafter: the “Mewat Ordinance“), which were in force and effect on the effective date (1954). This is in light of the provision of Section 156 of the Land Law, which prescribes that the provisions of Sections 152-155, which abolish the classification of the lands that were in effect pursuant to Ottoman legislation, do not derogate from land rights that existed prior to the legislation of the Land Law.

3.      The court examined the Appellants’ rights in and to the Lots on the effective date (1954) in accordance with the provisions of the Land Code and the Mewat Ordinance. It concluded that on the effective date, these lands were State-owned Mewat lands. In reaching this conclusion, the District Court relied primarily on the State’s expert opinion by Prof. Ruth Kark, which it preferred over that of the Appellants’ expert opinion, Prof. Oren Yiftachel. The court rejected the Appellants’ argument that the Lots in dispute are “Miri” lands which had been possessed and cultivated ab antiquo by the Al-Uqbi tribe, to which they belong (hereinafter: the “Al-Uqbi Tribe” or the “Tribe“). Additionally, it rejected the Appellants’ argument that even if the land at issue is Mewat land, they acquired such rights by virtue of cultivation and revival. The court further rejected the Appellants’ argument that at some stage, and in accordance with internal arrangements that were made among the members of the Tribe, the ownership rights regarding such Lots were acquired by the Appellants’ family. In this context, the court did not accept the Appellants’ argument that during the Ottoman period and the subsequent period of the British Mandate the Bedouin tribes, including the Al-Uqbi Tribe, benefitted from autonomy such that the governing authorities recognized internal arrangements made by the members of the Tribe with respect to the lands in the Negev as valid arrangements reflecting property rights, even if such rights were not registered in the Land Registry (the “Tabu“).

The court of first instance elaborated that in order for land to be considered Miri land pursuant to the Ottoman Land Code, it must be demonstrated that at some point it was assigned to some person by the authorities. The court of first instance ruled that the Appellants had not proven that the Lots were assigned at any time whatsoever by the authorities to their family or to any other person, and therefore they had not proven that the land at issue is Miri land. On the other hand, the court ruled that the Lots should be classified as State-owned Mewat land from the date of the expropriation, since, as emerges from Prof. Kark’s opinion, in the year in which the Ottoman Land Code was legislated (1858), the Lots stood barren and uncultivated and were more than a mile and half (2.2185 km) away from a permanent town. Thus, the conditions prescribed in the Land Code for classifying land as Mewat land were met. In the factual dispute between the parties regarding the Lots’ distance from a place of settlement at the time of the legislation of the Land Code, the court of first instance ruled that the Appellants did not meet the burden to prove the existence of a permanent town within a mile and half of the Lots, and also did not prove that the Tribe ever settled on the Lots in dispute. In this matter, the court of first instance adopted the opinion of the State’s expert, Prof. Ruth Kark, who testified that until the end of the First World War (1918) there were no permanent towns in the area of the Lots and these Lots were barren and uncultivated, preferring this opinion over that of the Appellants’ expert, Prof. Oren Yiftachel, who claimed that the Tribe established towns on the Lots and had cultivated them ab antiquo. The court of first instance elaborated on the fact that Prof. Kark’s opinion was detailed and thorough and relied on reliable historical sources from which it emerges that the Lots were barren wild areas at the relevant time. On the other hand, the court ruled, Prof. Yiftachel’s conduct left an uncomfortable feeling and compromised his credibility. The court of first instance elaborated on the fact that during his cross examination, it was discovered that Prof. Yiftachel relied on sources without having read them, cited some of the sources upon which he relied in a tendentious manner and ignored sources which did not support the conclusion he wished to present. As for the possibility of acquiring rights in and to Mewat lots by way of cultivation and revival, the court ruled that this possibility was eliminated upon the legislation of the Mewat Ordinance in 1921, and therefore, the Appellants must prove that they cultivated and revived the Lots prior to 1921. Based on Prof. Kark’s opinion and testimony, the court of lower instance reached the conclusion that the Lots were also barren and uncultivated when the Mewat Ordinance was legislated in 1921. Therefore, it ruled that the Lots have always been Mewat land, in and to which the State is granted ownership, and that at no stage were the conditions that are required for changing its classification from Mewat to Miri, and for acquiring private ownership therein and thereto by the Appellants’ family, fulfilled.

4.      The court of first instance further ruled that the additional opinions that were filed by the Appellants regarding the Lots’ condition during the years preceding the establishment of the State also do not come to the aid. With regard to the opinion of Mr. Shlomo Ben Yosef (hereinafter: “Ben Yosef“), the aerial photograph interpreter on behalf of the Appellants, the court ruled that it cannot substantiate the Appellants’ argument as to the cultivation and possession of the Lots during the relevant years, given the fact that it is based on one sole aerial photograph from 1945. The court of first instance emphasized that according to Ben Yosef’s testimony, it emerges from the aerial photograph that in 1945 the Lots were cultivated in a very sparse manner, and that Ben Yosef’s claim, that in that year there was a Bedouin rural town on the Lots’ area, is unfounded and refers to the presence of a thin population spread over an area of 30,000 dunams. With regard to the opinion of Mr. Abu Friecha, the surveyor on behalf of the Appellants (hereinafter: “Abu Friecha“), the court of lower instance elaborated on the fact that, except for one, all of the sites that were marked by him on the map, and with respect to which it was argued that they attest to the existence of an ancient Bedouin town in the area of the Lots, are outside of the area of the Lots. Additionally, the court of first instance stated that Abu Friecha admitted in his testimony that he did not measure the area of the Lots at all, and only marked sites on the map to which Appellants referred him. Additionally, Abu Friecha confirmed in his testimony that some of the sites that were marked on the map that he presented are not in fact located where they were marked. Therefore, the court of first instance ruled that this opinion also does not substantiate the Appellants’ argument regarding the existence of a permanent town within a mile and a half of the Lots at the relevant period of time, or that they were cultivated prior to the legislation of the Mewat Ordinance in 1921.

5.   In addition, the court of first instance rejected the Appellants’ argument that nomadic or semi-nomadic settlements (meaning, settlements that move within a single tract of land in accordance with the seasons of the year), can also, pursuant to the Ottoman Land Code, be considered a “town” such that the lands adjacent thereto would not be considered Mewat lands. The court of first instance elaborated on the fact that according to the interpretation of the Land Code that was given in case-law, a town for which the surrounding lands shall not be considered Mewat lands is a permanent town that is grounded in one place throughout the entire year. Therefore, the court of first instance ruled that even if the Al-Uqbi Tribe roamed in the area of the Lots between 1858 and 1921, this does not grant them ownership of the Lots. As was already stated, the court rejected the Appellants’ argument that even if the Lots at any stage were classified as Mewat, they acquired ownership of the Lots due to cultivating and reviving them. In this context, the court further ruled that even had the Appellants’ argument regarding cultivating and reviving the Lots not been rejected on a factual level, the cultivation and revival thereof alone would not have been sufficient to lead to the conclusion that the Appellants became owners of the Lots. This is because neither the Lots nor any part thereof were ever registered in the Land Registry (the “Tabu“) in their name, in the name of Appellant 1 who is the testator thereof or in the name of the person from whom Appellant 1 allegedly inherited the rights therein and thereto. In this context, the court mentioned the provisions of Section 2 of the Mewat Ordinance pursuant to which a person who cultivated Mewat land before the ordinance was published is required to register as the owners of the rights within two months from the date of its publication, otherwise he will lose his rights in and to the land. The court of first instance further rejected the Appellants’ argument that the Tribe is not required to register the Lots in its name in the Land Registry (the “Tabu“) in order to acquire rights therein since the Ottoman administration and the British Mandate government granted the Bedouin autonomy in the Negev areas and granted legal validity to rights that were acquired in and to the land pursuant to traditional Bedouin law. The court of first instance also adopted Prof. Kark’s opinion in this matter, pursuant to which both during the Ottoman period and the British Mandate period there was no sweeping recognition of the Bedouin’s ownership of lands in the Negev, and preferred it over the opinion of Prof. Yiftachel who posited that the Ottoman administration and the British Mandate government granted legal validity to rights that were acquired pursuant to traditional Bedouin law, even without being registered in the Land Registry (the “Tabu“). In this context, the court of first instance rejected the Appellants’ argument that their position is supported by the declaration voiced by Winston Churchill, the Secretary of State for the Colonies, in a meeting he held with the High Commissioner in 1921, that the British will not harm the special rights and customs of the Bedouin (Official Report, 29 March 1921, Great Britain Public Record Office, C.O. 733/2/77; hereinafter: the “Churchill Declaration“). In this matter, the court of first instance ruled that one cannot attribute a legal status to the said declaration without it having been anchored in explicit acts of legislation, and that had the British been interested in granting binding legal status to the Bedouin land ownership system, it can be assumed that they would have expressed this in official legislation. Additionally, the court of first instance ruled that it is not at all clear what Churchill meant in the said declaration, and therefore one cannot rely on this declaration in order to create legal rights ex nihilo.

6.      The court of first instance further stated that the Appellants’ argument that they are exempt from registering their rights in and to the Lots in the Land Registry (the “Tabu“), is not consistent with various contracts that were presented by them as testimony. For example, in contracts C/1 and C/13, which relate to the Araqib 2 and Sharia 132 Lots, the seller undertakes to register the lot in the name of the purchaser. The court of first instance elaborated on the fact that had the members of the Tribe believed that purchasing rights in accordance with traditional Bedouin law was sufficient in order to grant legal validity to their ownership of the land, it can be assumed that they would not have bothered to stipulate the registration of the lot in the Land Registry (the “Tabu“), in the sale agreement. As to the contracts themselves, the court of first instance stated that they do not state the origin of the Lots’ sellers’ rights in and to the land, and that in the absence of registration of the sellers’ rights in the Land Registry (the “Tabu“), these contracts cannot constitute evidence that rights therein and thereto were lawfully acquired. Additionally, the court of lower instance ruled that contracts between private parties do not bind the authorities or grant them rights in and to the land, when rights were not lawfully acquired therein and thereto to begin with.

7.      After ruling that the Appellants’ family did not acquire rights in and to the Lots by virtue of cultivation and revival, the court of first instance examined whether they have a claim by virtue of a period of prescription. In this context, the court of first instance elaborated on the fact that the Ottoman land laws do not allow acquiring rights in and to Mewat lands by virtue of prescription, and therefore, once it was determined that the Lots are Mewat classified lands, the Appellants do not have a prescription claim. Above and beyond that which was necessary, the court of first instance also rejected the Appellants’ claim of acquired rights in and to the Lots by virtue of a period of prescription on its merits. The court ruled that, pursuant to the Ottoman Land Code and Section 22 of the Prescription Law, 5718-1958 (hereinafter: the “Prescription Law“), insofar as at issue is possession that began before 1943, continuous possession of the land for the duration of 15 years is required in order to acquire rights in and to land by virtue of a period of prescription. In the case at hand, the court of first instance ruled, the majority of the documents that the Appellants presented with respect to the Lots relate to the years between 1943 and 1951 (when the Appellants claim they were expelled from the land) and the earliest document they presented with respect to the Lots was a tithe payment certificate from 1937. The court of first instance therefore ruled that the Appellants did not meet the burden of proving that they held the Lots continuously for the period of time required by the above-mentioned laws.

8.      An additional claim that was raised by the Appellants related to the rights in and to the Lots by virtue of indigenousness and transitional justice. In this matter, the court of first instance ruled that this is a weighty matter that the legislature should address, but further ruled that the existing law does not recognize rights by virtue of indigenousness and therefore it is inappropriate to address this claim. Furthermore, the court of first instance stated that it doubts whether the Al-Uqbi Tribe can be considered an indigenous group under international law since they themselves claim that they arrived in the Negev after it was already controlled by the Ottoman Empire, and therefore they are not an indigenous minority which was conquered by a foreign administration that arrived to its land.

For all of these reasons, the court of first instance rejected the Appellants’ claim of rights in and to the Lots and ordered that they be registered in the name of the State and the Development Authority. Additionally, and in light of the conclusions it so reached, the court of lower instance did not find it appropriate to rule that the Appellants are entitled to compensation due to the expropriation of the Lots, pursuant to the Acquisition Law.

The Appellants’ Arguments

9.      The Appellants do not accept the District Court’s judgment and in the appeal before us they claim that their family has been living in the Negev for centuries, and that despite this the court of first instance ruled that during that entire time it did not acquire any rights whatsoever in and to its lands. According to the Appellants, this is an unjust and unreasonable outcome that derives from the adoption of an historical and legal doctrine, rooted in case-law, by virtue of which the Bedouin tribes are dispossessed of their historical lands. The Appellants dispute the court of first instance’s factual findings, including, inter alia, the rulings that the Lots were barren and uncultivated between 1858 and 1921 and were further than a mile and half from a town. Additionally, the Appellants dispute the legal conclusion that the court of lower instance reached, that the Lots are State-owned Mewat land. Finally, the Appellants claim that the court of first instance’s findings and conclusions with respect to the validity of the State’s expropriation in 1954 pursuant to the Acquisition Law are also erroneous and warrant intervention.

10.  On a factual-historical level, the Appellants claim that the court chose to ignore substantiated evidence that was presented before it and that relies on various research and historical sources which prove that the Al-Uqbi Tribe had been settled on the Lots and had cultivated them since as early as 1807. In this context, the Appellants refer, inter alia, to the opinion of Prof. Yiftachel, and the annexes thereto, to the opinion of the surveyor Abu Friecha, to the opinion of the aerial photographs interpreter Ben Yosef, and to the testimonies of the Tribe’s elders (hereinafter: the “Tribe’s Elders“), who allegedly delivered a first-hand version as to the condition of the Lots at the relevant time. Additionally, the Appellants refer to various official publications of the Mandate government and of the State of Israel in the years following the establishment of the State, which, according to them, prove that the Tribe was settled on the Lots and cultivated them. The Appellants claim that given the many pieces of evidence as to the possession and cultivation of the Lots by the Tribe throughout generations, the court of first instance erred when preferring Prof. Kark’s opinion to that of Prof. Yiftachel. It is argued that contrary to Prof. Yiftachel, who visited the area of the Lots and who, in addition to the historical-theoretical research, also elaborated on the physical evidence of the existence of an ancient Bedouin town in the said Lots, Prof. Kark’s opinion relied exclusively on the journey literature of various 19th century European travelers, missionaries and researchers who passed through the Negev areas on their journeys. According to the Appellants, the travel literature upon which Prof. Kark relied should not be considered credible, since their authors did not come to the Negev in order to research the Bedouin population and their entire reference to such population was incidental and is suffused with western prejudice. In addition, the Appellants argue that even if it would have been appropriate to trust the testimonies of the 19th century researchers who visited the area of the Lots, Prof. Kark’s opinion ignored testimonies and letters of many Negev researchers who were mentioned in Prof. Yiftachel’s opinion and who reported on extensive Bedouin agriculture and settlement in the Negev.

11.  Alongside the appeal they filed, the Appellants are also petitioning to submit an additional piece of evidence at the appeal stage, which relates to the Tribe’s possession and cultivation of the Lots. At issue is a document which is alleged to be a report that was prepared by the Hachsharat Hayishuv company in 1920, which includes a survey regarding the condition of the Negev lands. In this survey, it is argued, areas that were possessed and cultivated by the Appellants’ testators were appraised, and it proves their rights in and to the Lots. This evidence, it is argued, was discovered at the last stages of conducting the proceeding at the court of first instance, as a result of research that was conducted by Prof. Yiftachel together with additional researchers in order to write a joint article. According to the Appellants, its submission at the appeal stage should be allowed in light of its importance and in light of the fact that at hand is a case addressing a matter of principle. I shall begin by stating that I do not find it appropriate to allow the evidence to be submitted at the appeal stage, based on the criteria outlined in this matter in case-law. It has been ruled that leave to submit new evidence in appeal shall be granted sparingly and only in cases in which the evidence that is being requested to be added is simple and conclusive and bears significant importance relating to the core of the dispute between the parties (CA 105/05 Dahan v. Michele Kason, paragraph 4 of Justice E. Arbel‘s judgment (November 10, 2005); CA 1773/06 Aleph v. Kibbutz Ayelet Hashachar, paragraph 17 of Justice A. Procaccia‘s judgment (December 19, 2010); CA 679/11 Dardikman v. Nadav, paragraph 29 of Justice U. Shoham‘s judgment (March 27, 2014)). This is not the case in the case at hand. Precedent also establishes that the party requesting to add the evidence must demonstrate that it did not know of its existence when the hearing in the procedural instance was conducted and also could not have discovered it had it acted with proper diligence to do so (see CA 374/08 Katan v. Horenstein, paragraphs 9-10 of Justice Z. Zylbertal‘s judgment (December 25, 2012)). In the case at hand, it emerges from the application itself that the evidence was in the Appellants’ possession at the time the case was being heard in the court of first instance. Despite this the Appellants did not bother to submit it nor do they not provide any explanation whatsoever for such conduct.

12.  At the legal level, the Appellants argue that according to the laws that applied to the Negev area until the establishment of the State, the fact that the Al-Uqbi Tribe had lived and resided on the Lots for generations granted them ownership thereof. The Appellants repeatedly argue that both the Ottoman administration and the British Mandate government granted the Bedouin legal autonomy to manage their property and their lands in accordance with traditional Bedouin law. Therefore, according to the Appellants, the Ottoman Land Code and the Mewat Ordinance did not apply at all to the Negev areas until the establishment of the State and the law that was in effect in the Negev at the relevant time was traditional Bedouin law. According to the Appellants, the court of first instance ignored the many pieces of evidence that were presented attesting to the existence of such autonomy from which the Bedouin tribes benefitted at such time in the Negev expanses and the evidence that was presented regarding the acquisition of rights in and to the Lots by the Appellants’ family in accordance with traditional Bedouin law. In this context, the Appellants emphasize the fact that both during the Ottoman period and the British Mandate period many Bedouin registered land in the Negev in their name and sold them to the Zionist institutions. This fact, it is argued, proves that prior to the establishment of the State the authorities recognized the Bedouin’s rights in and to the Negev lands and allowed them to register these lands in their names, if only they wanted to do so – both before the legislation of the Mewat Ordinance and thereafter.

13.  Alternatively, the Appellants claim that even if their rights in and to the Lots should be examined in accordance with the Ottoman Land Code and the Mandate Mewat Ordinance, the court of first instance erred when ruling that the Lots were State-owned Mewat classified lands rather than Miri lands owned by the Appellants. In this context, the Appellants claim that the court of first instance erred by not transferring the burden of persuasion to the State, given that the State has acted with a material lack of good faith and, for over 30 years, intentionally avoided bringing the conflicting claims that were filed with respect to the Lots in the framework of the settlement proceedings before the court. This conduct, it is argued, caused the Appellants severe evidential damage and severely sabotaged their chances of proving their ownership of the Lots. According to the Appellants, the court of first instance erred by not expressing this in the form of shifting the burden of persuasion, such that instead of the Appellants being required to prove family ownership of the Lots, the burden would transfer to the State to prove that at hand are Mewat lands that were owned thereby.

14.  On the merits of the matter, the Appellants argue that the correct interpretation of the Ottoman Land Code should lead to the conclusion that in the case of the Lots, the conditions required for classifying lands as Mewat lands were not met. First, it was argued that it was proven that the Appellants’ family had been possessing and cultivating the Lots for many years, and therefore they are not abandoned and barren lands which pursuant to the Land Code could be considered Mewat lands; Second, it was argued that the Lots were not more than a mile and half from the location of a town as the Land Code requires. In this context, the Appellants argue that according to its correct interpretation, the Ottoman Land Code also recognized nomadic (or semi-nomadic) settlement of Bedouin in the Negev as a “town” such that the lands adjacent thereto are not Mewat lands. It was argued that this interpretation coincides with that which is stated in other Mandate government acts of legislation in land matters. The Appellants further argue that the said interpretation of the term “town” in the Ottoman Land Code coincides with the purpose of such law to encourage agricultural cultivation of barren lands by way of granting ownership of the cultivated lands that are adjacent to population concentrations. The Appellants further argue in this context that the court of first instance erred when it ruled that even according to the Appellants the Lots were not settled year-round and the towns in which it was alleged that they resided were no more than temporary camping locations that were built on occasion. According to the Appellants, this ruling is an erroneous interpretation that was given by the court of first instance of their claim that the Al-Uqbi Tribe were not nomads, but rather semi-nomads. The meaning of this claim, so it is alleged, is that the members of the Tribe settled in permanent camping sites from which they would roam during the winter season and to which they would return once the rains stopped. It was argued that the Al-Uqbi Tribe had two such permanent camping sites, one in the Araqib Lots and the other in the Sharia Lots. However, the Appellants emphasize, they never argued that the towns that the Tribe built in the Lots existed only during part of the seasons or that they ceased to exist when they went out to graze.

15.  Additionally, the Appellants argue that the interpretation offered by them of the term “town” in the Ottoman Land Code is warranted in the instant circumstance in order to prevent the absurd and discriminatory result that the court of first instance reached, by which areas of livelihood that functioned for centuries as towns for all intents and purposes are not recognized as towns for the purpose of determining the ownership of the land. According to the Appellants, the narrow definition which this court adopted in the past for the term “town” in the Ottoman Land Code, pursuant to which only a permanent town that is built with stone houses is a town which is surrounded by Miri lands, does severe injustice to Bedouin and discriminates them due to their nomadic lifestyle and culture. Therefore, it was argued that the court of first instance erred when it did not consider the interpretation offered by the Appellants of the term “town” in the Ottoman Land Code, and instead adopted the existing case-law in this matter, without reexamination, as requested by the Appellants.

16.  An additional argument raised by the Appellants is that the court of first instance erred when it ruled that the Lots should be classified as privately-owned lands or as Mewat, in accordance with their condition in the year in which the Ottoman Land Code was legislated (1858). According to the Appellants, the court of first instance perceived itself as bound by case-law established by this court. However, the Appellants argue, this is a legal mistake, since terms that are prescribed in an act of legislation should be interpreted at the time they are being implemented in a given case. Therefore, according to the Appellants, one must deviate from existing case-law rules with respect to classifying lands in the Land of Israel pursuant to the law that preceded the Land Law, and rule that the classification of the Lots, as privately-owned lands or as Mewat, should be examined in accordance with their condition at the time the settlement proceedings therein began.

17.  Alternatively, the Appellants argue that even if the Lots should be classified as Mewat lands, it should be ruled that their family acquired ownership therein by virtue of cultivation and revival, as it was proven that the family cultivated these lands for many years. In this context, the Appellants argue that the fact that their family did not act to register the Lots in its name within the period of time prescribed by the Mewat Ordinance does not deny the possibility that it acquired rights therein and thereto by virtue of revival. This approach, it is argued, coincides with the Mandate Supreme Court’s interpretation of the Mewat Ordinance and with the fact that those who did not register their rights in and to cultivated Mewat land within two months following the publication of the ordinance nevertheless succeeded in registering their lands in their name in the framework of the settlement proceedings that followed its legislation. Additionally, the proposed interpretation is consistent with the fact that, even many years after the publication of the ordinance, many Bedouin did not have difficulty registering lands throughout the Negev in their names and selling them to the Zionist movement. Additionally, according to the Appellants, said interpretation coincides with the fact that Section 2 of the Mewat Ordinance was omitted from the “Drayton” Official Compilation of Mandate Acts of Legislation that was published in 1933. Therefore, it was argued that not registering the Appellants’ family’s rights in and to the Lots does not lead to the loss of such rights.

18.  An additional argument by the Appellants is that the Lots should be registered in their name even if they did not acquire rights in and to them pursuant to the Ottoman Land Code and the Mandate Mewat Ordinance that preceded that Land Law. In this context, they point to three normative sources, as follows: the laws of equity, the basic laws and international law. With regard to the laws of equity, the Appellants argue that the Mandate law and case-law recognized that use and possession of land for many years create equity rights therein. Therefore, even if their family did not acquire rights in and to the Lots pursuant to the Ottoman Land Code and the Mandate Mewat Ordinance, it acquired ownership rights therein and thereto by equity, due to the fact that it possessed and cultivated the Lots for generations. With regard to the basic laws, the Appellants argue that the Ottoman Land Code and the Mandate Mewat Ordinance should be interpreted in accordance with the constitutional principles of equality and human dignity. These principles, it is argued, warrant interpreting the land legislation that preceded the Land Law in a modern manner which would prevent discrimination against the Bedouin population and its continued dispossession from its historical areas of livelihood in the Negev. With regard to international law, it was argued that since the Bedouin are an indigenous group on the Negev lands, such laws should be interpreted in a manner that grants them rights in and to their historical lands. The Appellants further argue that the Bedouin have unique protections and rights by virtue of international law which should be considered when ruling on the matter of their ownership of the Lots. Therefore, even if according to the Mandate and Ottoman land legislation that was in effect during the relevant years, they did not acquire rights in and to the Lots, at present there is an obligation to recognize these rights by virtue of international law. According to the Appellants, the court of first instance erred when it ruled that the law in Israel does not recognize rights by virtue of indigenousness. It was further argued that the rights of the Bedouin in and to the Negev lands are grounded in this context in customary international law. Such grounding, it was argued, requires the Israeli courts to consider the rights that the Bedouin acquired in and to their historical lands even if this law was not adopted in an Israeli act of legislation.

19.  Finally, the Appellants raise arguments that relate to the legality of the expropriation orders that were issued to the Lots by virtue of the Acquisition Law. According to them, these orders were issued to Lots based on the erroneous assumption that at hand are barren Mewat lands that are not owned by anyone. However, once it was been proven that the Lots were owned by the Appellants’ family, this case falls within those special and extraordinary cases in which one can appeal that which is stated in the expropriation certificate. It was further argued that the expropriation orders for the Lots should be cancelled on the grounds that since the expropriation, the Lots have stood barren for 58 years and only in the last two years was an attempt made to plant a few groves therein. Therefore, the Appellants argue that the court of first instance erred when it ruled that the purpose for which the Lots were expropriated was realized. This ruling is based on the fact that the expropriation of the Lots was made as part of the expropriation of a larger tract of land, and assumes that if the purposes of the expropriation in part of such tract of land were realized, then it can be said that the purpose of the expropriation was realized with respect to its entirety. However, the fact that other land lots that were expropriated along with the Lots in dispute were used does not mean that the purpose of the expropriation was also realized with respect to those lots which remained barren. The question whether the purpose of the expropriation was realized should be examined with respect to each lot on its own.

The State’s Arguments

20.  The State relies on the judgment of the court of first instance and claims that the appeal should be denied. On a factual level, the State argues that the court of first instance was presented with abundant evidence to the fact that, from the beginning of the 19th century until after the establishment of the State, the Lots stood barren and uncultivated. With regard to the parties’ expert opinions, the State argues that it was proven to the court of first instance that Prof. Yiftachel’s opinion is tendentious and unfounded and it follows that the court of first instance justifiably preferred Prof. Kark’s opinion and testimony. With regard to the opinion that was submitted by the surveyor Abu Friecha and by the interpreter Ben Yosef, the State claims that it was proven that they were materially flawed and cannot be relied upon as opinions that substantiate the Appellants’ arguments. Therefore, the State claims that the Appellants did not succeed in proving that the Al-Uqbi Tribe settled on the Lots and cultivated them for many years prior to the establishment of the State and that at most it was proven by them that during certain periods of time the Lots served the Tribe for grazing and camping.

21.  The State further argues that the Appellants acted unlawfully, and, in the framework of the appeal, submitted a revised version of Prof. Yiftachel’s opinion without receiving leave, despite the fact that the court of first instance did not permit its submission and instructed that it be ignored. Additionally, in the framework of the appeal, again without receiving leave, the Appellants submitted an article written by Prof. Yiftachel relating the issues emerging in this proceeding and allegedly constituting an adaptation of the opinion that he submitted in the proceedings (the article of Prof. Yiftachel, Sandy Kedar and Ahmad Amara “Re-Examining the ‘Dead Negev Doctrine’: Property Rights in Arab Bedouin Regions” Mishpat U’mimshal 14 7 (2012)). This article was also not presented to the court of first instance. Therefore, the State requests that this Court ignore both the revised version of Prof. Yiftachel’s opinion which the Appellants submitted at the appeal stage, as well the article that he wrote based on this proceeding. The State further argues that some of the professional literature that the Appellants submitted in the framework of the appeal was not submitted thereby in the court of first instance, and it claims that for this reason it should also be ignored. I shall begin by stating in this matter that a review of the article to which the argument refers indicates that it is indeed based on the opinion that Prof. Yiftachel submitted in this proceeding, while adapting the opinion to the format of an academic article, and that the Appellants are using it as an additional opinion on their behalf, and without the article having been submitted with the court of first instance. Additionally, the Appellants cite various sources to which the article refers without them having been submitted with the court of first instance or in the appeal. There is merit to the State’s argument in all that relates to reliance upon the article or upon the new references to which it refers. Additionally, and in accordance with the decision of the court of first instance dated March 7, 2010, that which is stated in Prof. Yiftachel’s third opinion should be ignored insofar as it exceeds referring and responding to Prof. Kark’s opinion.

22.  At the legal level, the State argues that there is no substance to the Appellants’ argument that the Ottoman Land Code and the Mandate Mewat Ordinance should not be applied in this matter due to the autonomy which was granted to the Bedouin in the Negev during the periods of time when the Ottomans and British ruled the area. According to the State, the Bedouin in the Negev never received autonomy as alleged and even if there were periods of time in which the Mandate and Ottoman administrations had difficulty effectively controlling the Negev areas, they always perceived it as part of the sovereign land of the Land of Israel, that is subject to their control, and acted with respect thereto accordingly. It was further argued with respect to the Mandate period that not only is there no reflection of the fact that the Mandate government granted the Bedouin autonomy in the Negev areas and adopted their customs as a legal source of acquisition of rights in and to land, but actually the acts of legislation that were legislated and the Mandate case-law indicate the contrary. As to the Appellants’ argument that the Bedouin managed to register many lands in the Negev areas in their name even after the legislation of the Mewat Ordinance, the State claims that there may be various explanations, but whatever the reason may be, a sweeping conclusion that the ordinance does not apply in the Negev area or that the Bedouin were granted legal autonomy by the Mandate authorities cannot be drawn from such registration of lands in the name of the Bedouin after the legislation of the Mewat Ordinance.

23.  Given the conclusion that the state of the rights in and to the Lots must be examined pursuant to the Ottoman Land Code and the Mandate Mewat Ordinance, the State argues that the ruling of the court of first instance, that the Appellants’ family did not acquire any right whatsoever in and to the Lots, should be adopted. In this context, the State argues, inter alia, that Appellants’ interpretation of the term “town” in the Ottoman Land Code such that it includes Bedouin camps that are populated seasonally, is contrary to the language and the purpose of such law. According to the State, the Bedouin lifestyle was not foreign to the Ottoman Empire, which controlled vast areas in the Arabian Peninsula and Northern Africa. Therefore, had the Ottoman legislator perceived the Bedouin lifestyle as a source for acquiring property rights, it would have explicitly prescribed this in the law. Not doing so is not an inadvertent omission, and the conclusion that should be drawn is that the Ottoman legislator did not intend to grant rights in and to the land by virtue of the Bedouin lifestyle. The State further states that the Ottoman legislator distinguished between Mewat classified land and other classes of land when determining the criterion of distance from the end of a town (a mile and half). This fact also indicates that the Ottoman legislator did not wish to exclude the nomadic tribes’ areas of livelihood from the Mewat definition.

24.  The State further argues that given the conclusion that the Lots were Mewat lands, and given the Appellants did not prove the cultivation or revival of the Lots as required nor that that they received the authorities’ permission for these activities, the court of first instance was correct in ruling that the Lots were Mewat lands when the Mewat Ordinance was legislated in 1921, and remained such thereafter. With respect to the interpretation of the Mewat Ordinance that is offered by the Appellants, the State claims that there is no substance to the Appellants’ argument that Mandate case-law interpreted the ordinance as allowing the acquisition of rights by virtue of revival of Mewat lands, even after its publication in 1921. It was argued that the judgments to which the Appellants refer in support of their argument all ratify the validity of the Mewat Ordinance and hold that after its legislation it is no longer possible to acquire rights in and to Mewat lands by virtue of revival. As to the fact that Section 2 of the Ordinance was omitted from the Drayton legislation arrangement of 1933, the State states that even the Appellants agree that this does not mean that the section is cancelled, and that in any event, this is not sufficient to change that which is prescribed in Section 1 of the ordinance, i.e., that a person who revived Mewat lands without the authorities’ permission will not be entitled to acquire rights therein and thereto. Additionally, the State argues that the court was correct in ruling that the Appellants do not have a claim by virtue of a period of prescription, since this is not possible in Mewat lands. It further argues that in any event the rulings of the court of first instance should also be adopted on their merits, as the Appellants did not prove continuous possession and cultivation of the Lots for the period of time that is required to substantiate a claim of prescription in accordance with the Ottoman Land Code and Section 22 of the Prescription Law. With regard to the Appellants’ argument that rights in and to the Lots were acquired due to the fact that the Al-Uqbi Tribe has been possessing and using them ab antiquo, the State argues that even if this argument had been proven, the meaning thereof is that these are lands that were used in a collective-public manner by the Tribe. The legal conclusion that is derived from that is that these are Matruka-classified lands, and in accordance with Section 154(a) of the Land Law, they should be registered in its name.

25.  As to the burden of evidence, the State claims that, contrary to the Appellants’ arguments, the starting point in land settlement cases is that the person claiming the right in and to the land is required to prove his claim, and if he has not met the burden, the land shall be registered in the name of the State. Additionally, the State posits that there are no grounds for the Appellants’ claim that the delay in the examination in court of their claim to the Lots transfers the burden of evidence to the State to prove that the Lots were not Mewat lands. The State claims in this matter that it avoided filing a claim in relation to the Lots and advancing the examination in court of the rights therein and thereto as a result of its policy to prefer promoting compromises in Negev land settlement claims rather than seeking judicial resolutions. According to the State, this was because of the fact that the Bedouin population does not have legal rights in and to the Negev lands, and it assessed that judicial rulings to this effect would not advance the integration of this population in the life of the State. Therefore, the State preferred to promote unique decisions for the benefit of the Bedouin in the Negev by virtue of which they would be able to receive compensation even in the absence of rights in and to the land. The State adds that in the case at hand it also avoided bringing the Appellants’ matter for judicial ruling because it preferred the path of a compromise, and that it should not be charged with acting in bad faith conduct for doing so. The State further claims that the Appellants refused to any compromise arrangement that was offered to them with respect to the Lots, and emphasizes that if and to the extent the Appellants believed that the delay in completing the settlement proceedings related to the Lots was causing them damage, they had the option of filing a claim to the court at any time they wished, just as they eventually did in 2006. In any event, the State claims, even if it shall be ruled that the burden of evidence in this case lies on it to prove that the Lots are Mewat land, it met this burden in light of the evidence that was presented to the court of first instance.

26.  As is recalled, the Appellants raised additional claims that even if rights in and to the Lots were not acquired under the Ottoman Land Code and the Mewat Ordinance, these rights can be normatively anchored in the laws of equity, the basic laws and international law. In this matter, the State claims that ownership by virtue of laws of equity is no more than a recognition of a legal right, and in the absence of rights pursuant to law, it is inappropriate to adjudicate equity rights. The State further claims that if and to the extent there is substance to the claim that the Appellants’ tribe had been settled on the Lots for many years, then this would have constituted forceful unlawful seizing of lands from the authorities’ possession. Such seizure does not grant equity rights, and internal agreements among the members of the Tribe also do not have the power to grant a legal right in and to land when such a right would not have existed to begin with. With respect to the argument that the Mandate and Ottoman land legislation should be interpreted in the spirit of the basic laws, the State claims that it is inappropriate to interpret acts of legislation that have long been cancelled in a manner that is not true to the language and purpose thereof only in order to grant the Appellants rights that they never acquired in and to the land. The State further argues that accepting the Appellants’ claim to a new interpretation of the Mandate and Ottoman land legislation in the spirit of the basic laws, will prejudice legal stability and certainty, and would mean a retroactive infringement of rights that third parties acquired in and to Negev lands throughout the years pursuant to existing law. With regard to international law, the State claims that the court of lower instance was correct in ruling that Israeli law does not recognize rights of indigenous people, and further claims that the State of Israel did not join the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples of 2007 to which the Appellants refer and which does not constitute a binding international norm even among those nations that have signed it. The State further argues that the existence of such a customary norm in international law has not been proven and that there is no comparison to be drawn between indigenous people in countries such as Australia and Canada on the one hand, and the Bedouin population in Israel in general, and the Appellants in particular, on the other. In this context, the State emphasizes that in the countries that recognized the rights of indigenous people that reside in their area, at issue were collective rights that were granted to the entire indigenous population in their area. By contrast, in the case at hand the Appellants are requesting to register the Lots in their name, and to acquire private ownership thereof.

27.  The State does not object to the approach adopted in the judgment which is the subject of the appeal and which, while rejecting the arguments raised by the Appellants with respect to the validity of the expropriation in 1954, further examined whether the Appellants have a right or an interest in the Lots for the purpose of ruling in the matter of compensation to which they might be entitled by virtue of the Acquisition Law as a result of the expropriation. The State does not object even though the Appellants did not raise claims regarding compensation at all and sufficed with claims regarding the rights in and to the Lots to which they are allegedly entitled and regarding the expropriation orders being null and void. Therefore, in the appeal, the State focused its arguments on both of these issues as well. The State’s response to the Appellants’ arguments regarding the rights in and to the Lots to which they are allegedly entitled was detailed above, and with regard to the voidness of the expropriation orders, the State claims that the conclusions of the court of first instance should be adopted. It emphasizes that the possibility of challenging the expropriation orders which were issued by virtue of the Acquisition Law is very narrow to begin with, and is non-existent in the case at hand in light of the fact that the Appellants are challenging the legality of the expropriation of the Lots more than 60 years after the expropriation. On the merits of the matter, the State claims that the question of whether the Lots were privately-owned at the time of their expropriation is not relevant to the legality of the expropriation, since the Acquisition Law allows expropriating privately-owned land if and to the extent it was not in the owners’ possession at the time of the expropriation. As to the Appellants’ argument that the expropriation should be cancelled on the grounds that the purpose of the acquisition was not realized, the State notes that the case-law regarding the cancellation of expropriations in which the purpose was not realized, does not apply to expropriations by virtue of the Acquisition Law. In any event, the State also notes that according to the Land (Acquisition for Public Purposes) Ordinance, 1943 (hereinafter: the “Land Ordinance“) as amended in Amendment no. 3 in 2010, expropriations to which such case-law applies will also be valid even if their purpose was not realized if 25 years have lapsed since the publication of the notice. For this reason as well, the State argues, and given the fact that in the case at hand more than 60 years have lapsed since the expropriation was effected, the claim regarding the purpose of the expropriation not being realized does not aid the Appellants.

Discussion and Ruling

28.  The six consolidated claims which were heard by the District Court addressed conflicting claims of ownership that were raised in the framework of a land settlement proceeding. Although the Appellants’ claims in this matter were pushed to the margins of the appeal, the first issue that must be addressed in this appeal is the issue of the validity of the expropriation pursuant to the Acquisition Law. This is due to the fact that the State’s claim in the settlement proceedings primarily relied on that expropriation, and the ruling in this matter materially projects onto the other issues that were raised in the proceedings (regarding the possibility of objecting to the validity of an expropriation pursuant to the Acquisition Law, by way of an indirect challenge, see CFH 1099/13 The State of Israel v. Abu Friech (April 12, 2015)). If and to the extent I shall reach the conclusion that these claims are to be rejected, it will be necessary to further examine whether the Appellants had any right or interest whatsoever in the Lots prior to the expropriation, including all of the sub-issues that emerge in this context. This examination is necessary in order to rule whether the Appellants were entitled to compensation or to alternative land due to the expropriation. It should be noted that the reference in the judgment which is the subject of the appeal to the matter of the right or interest of the Appellants in and to the Lots prior to the expropriation for the purpose of ruling in the matter of the compensation due to the expropriation was at the initiative of the court of first instance. The court deemed itself obligated to examine the issue in light of that stated in the judgment in the Jabareen Case (paragraphs 38-39 of the judgment). This is despite the fact that the Appellants, on their part, did not raise the said arguments regarding compensation due to the expropriation before the court of lower instance. I posit that it is doubtful whether this is what the judgment in the Jabareen Case intended. However, once the court of first instance chose to take this path, and once the State agreed therewith, and did not raise any in limine argument in this matter, I shall also continue to take this same path if and to the extent I shall reach the conclusion that the arguments in the matter of the voidness of the expropriation should be rejected.

The Expropriation of the Lots

29.  On more than one occasion, this court has addressed the unique characteristics of the Acquisition Law and of the expropriations that were performed by virtue thereof as a law that was intended to retroactively legitimize the seizing by the government of abandoned lands without legal authority, in the years following the establishment of the State (see CA 3535/04 Dinar v. The Minister of Finance (April 27, 2006), in paragraph 6 of the judgment of Justice (as was her title at the time) D. Beinisch (hereinafter: the “Dinar Case”). Section 2 of the Acquisition Law provides that upon the fulfillment of three cumulative conditions which are prescribed in the section “[the property] shall vest in the Development Authority and be regarded as free from any charge, and the Development Authority may forthwith take possession thereof.” These are the terms: (a) on April 1st 1952, the property was not in the possession of its owners; (b) the property was used or assigned for purposes of essential development, settlement or security during the period between May 14th, 1948 and April 1st, 1952; (c) on the date of the expropriation it was still required for any of the said purposes. Section 2 of the Acquisition Law further provides conditions for issuing an expropriation certificate. With respect to these certificates it has been ruled that they constitute conclusive evidence to the veracity of their contents and that the possibility of challenging their legality is very narrow (see HCJ 5/54 Younis v. The Minister of Finance, IsrSC 8 314, 317 (1954); CA 816/81 Gera v. The Development Authority, IsrSC 39(1) 542, 547 (1985); HCJ 84/83 El-Wachili v. The State of Israel, IsrSC 37(4) 173, 179-180 (1983); CA 517/85 The Commissioner of the Waqf of the Maronite Church v. The Development Authority, IsrSC 42(1) 696, 701-702 (1988), as well as the Dinar Case, in paragraph 6). The original owners of the abandoned lands that were seized by the government and expropriated pursuant to the Acquisition Law are entitled, under the law, to compensation or to alternative land in the event that the expropriated land was used for agriculture and was its owners’ main source of livelihood (Section 3 of the Acquisition Law). However, there is no opening whatsoever in the Acquisition Law allowing the return of the expropriated land to its original owners, even if the owners returned thereto. There is no denying that the Acquisition Law severely infringes the right to property that was recognized as a constitutional right in the Basic Law: Human Dignity and Liberty, and the opinion has even been expressed in the past that had the Acquisition Law been legislated at the present time, it would have been appropriate to cancel it due to it being unconstitutional (see the Dinar Case, in paragraph 7). However, it is an old law that is at issue, and the preservation of laws section that is prescribed in Section 10 of the Basic Law, which has its own logic, does not allow harming its validity, despite the constitutional difficulty it raises. Additionally, it had been ruled that in light of the Acquisition Law’s special nature and the unique historical circumstances that led to its legislation, it is inappropriate at the present time to appeal the constitutionality of the expropriations that were effected by virtue thereof or to determine criteria that are more flexible that those that were prescribed in case-law for the purpose of interpreting the conditions for expropriation that are prescribed in Section 2 of the law (see the Jabareen Case, in paragraphs 35-36 of the judgment of Justice Y. Danziger, see also the Dinar Case, in paragraph 7).

30.  In the case at hand, the Appellants do not argue that the conditions prescribed in Section 2 of the Acquisition Law were not fulfilled with respect to the Lots. For example, they are not claiming that they possessed the Lots at the Acquisition Law’s effective date (April 1, 1952). All that the Appellants argue is that the relevant expropriation orders were issued based on the erroneous assumption that the Lots are barren Mewat lands while in fact they were lands that were owned by their family. Even if the Appellants’ claim that they are the owners of the Lots had been accepted, it would not have been sufficient to lead to the expropriation being void. Indeed, according to the condition prescribed in Section 2 of the Acquisition Law, for it to be possible to expropriate it under this law, it was sufficient that the expropriated land not be in its owners’ possession on April 1, 1952, provided that the other two conditions prescribed in the section were also fulfilled.

31.  The additional claim that the Appellants raised regarding the validity of the expropriation is that the orders should be declared void due to the fact that the purpose of the expropriation was not realized. This argument was justly rejected by the court of first instance since it relies on the case-law from HCJ 2390/96 Karasik v. The State of Israel, IsrSC 55(2) 625 (2001) (hereinafter: the “Karasik Case”), which, as has already been decided on more than one occasion, does not apply to expropriations that were effected pursuant to the Acquisition Law (see the Dinar Case, in paragraph 8; and HCJ 840/97 Sabit v. The State of Israel, IsrSC 57(4) 803, 815 (2003)). In any event, it was ruled in the Karasik Case that the application of its case-law rule is meant to be based on legislation that shall implement the principle and shall prescribe the conditions for its application (in this matter also see HCJ 2390/96 Karasik v. The State of Israel (February 9, 2009)). In this context the State correctly referred in its arguments to Amendment no. 3 of the Land Ordinance, pursuant to which the application of the Karasik case-law rule was limited to 25 years from the date of the publication of the expropriation notice. Given the fact that at hand is an expropriation from more than 60 years ago, there is no application to the Karasik case-law rule, even if we were of the opinion that is applies to expropriations pursuant to the Acquisition Law (see in this matter: HCJ 9804/09 Shawahna v. The Development Authority (May 29, 2014), in paragraph 18 of the judgment of Justice D. Barak-Erez; and CA 6288/98 Klil v. The Development Authority (August 11, 2011), in paragraph 9 of the judgment of Justice (as was his title at the time) A. Grunis). It shall be noted, above and beyond that which is necessary, that according to the findings of the court of first instance, the claim that the purpose of the expropriation was not realized, should also not be accepted on its merits. It emerges from the evidence that was presented (the affidavit of Mr. Shlomo Tzizer, Head of the Development Department at the Southern Region of the Israel Lands Authority, which was attached as Exhibit Res/5 in the Appeal), that 4 out of 6 of the Lots in dispute (Sharia 133, Sharia 134, Araqib 6 and Araqib 60) have, for years, been used for agricultural and forestation purposes, and this is sufficient in order to contradict the claim regarding non-realization of the purposes of the expropriation with respect to all of the Lots on its merits (see the case-law rule that in this context, the uses in all of the expropriated area should be examined and not in each lot separately, in HCJFH 4466/94 Nuseibeh v. The Minister of Finance, IsrSC 49(4) 68 (1995), in paragraph 9 of the judgment of Justice E. Goldberg; the Jabareen Case, in paragraph 36).

32.  Once the Appellants’ arguments regarding the validity of the expropriations in 1954 pursuant to the Acquisition Law were rejected, it is inappropriate to intervene in the ruling of the court of first instance that the Lots should be registered in the name of the State and the Development Authority, and the Appellants’ claim for ownership of those Lots was justly rejected. However, in accordance with the course of the discussion that was outlined in paragraph 28 above, we must now examine whether prior to the expropriation the Appellants or their heirs possessed a right or an interest in and to the Lots, entitling them to receive compensation or alternative land due to the expropriation in accordance with that stated in Section 3 of the Acquisition Law.

The Normative Framework for Examining the Appellants’ Rights in and to the Lots

The Autonomy and Traditional Bedouin Law Argument

33.  The question of whether the Appellants or their heirs possessed any right or interest in and to the Lots prior to the expropriation should be examined in accordance with the law that applied to these Lots at such time. At hand is a case of an expropriation from 1954, and the question that arises is what the law was that applied to the Lots at such time which determined the existence of a right or interest therein and thereto. Prior to the legislation of the Land Law in 1969, and even after the establishment of the State, the land laws that had been legislated during the Ottoman period and the Mandate period remained in effect. The Appellants claim that these laws should not be applied to their matter since the Ottoman administration and the subsequent Mandate government granted legal autonomy to the Bedouin in the Negev and allowed them to conduct themselves in accordance with traditional Bedouin law and to acquire rights in and to land by virtue thereof. The Appellants further claim that according to traditional Bedouin law, prior to the expropriation, Appellant 1 and they as his heirs, possessed an ownership right in and to the Lots. A similar claim regarding the special law that relates to the Negev lands and the rights of the Bedouin therein and thereto was raised in the past and rejected by this court in CA 218/74 Huashela v. The State of Israel, IsrSC 38(3) 141 (1984) (hereinafter: the “Huashela Case”), where Justice A. Chalima ruled as follows:

“And the last among the arguments that were voiced on behalf of the appellants claims that the appellants should be granted special treatment due to the special nature of the Negev lands. This claim is not to be recognized in this appeal. If the Ottoman legislator did not find it appropriate (and the Mandate authorities acted in the same way when legislating the 1921 ordinance), to designate special laws in the framework of the law to the Negev lands, which were similar to many and widespread areas in the Ottoman state, it is not the court’s role to grant reliefs such as those that are requested, which do not comply with the legislator’s explicit provisions. This argument shall also not be accepted and is rejected.” (ibid, on page 154)

The Appellants are aware of this court ruling in the Huashela Case, however according to them this is an erroneous ruling and they call for it to be changed. On the other hand, the State claims that it is not appropriate to change that which was ruled in this matter in the Huashela Case. According to it, the District Court justly ruled that the question whether the Appellants’ family acquired any right or interest in and to the Lots should be examined in accordance with the Mandate and Ottoman land laws that were in effect in the Land of Israel prior to the establishment of the State and which remained in effect until their cancellation in 1969, upon the legislation of the Land Law.

34.  After examining the parties’ arguments regarding this matter, I am of the opinion that the Appellants’ arguments regarding the existence of Bedouin autonomy in the Negev area prior to the establishment of the State should be rejected. In this context, the Appellants refer to geographical-historical research in which it was stated that the Ottoman administration and the subsequent Mandate government had difficulty controlling the area of the Negev and the Bedouin tribes that resided therein, and attributed little importance to this area (see Ruth Kark, The Negev During the British Mandate – The Jewish Settlement, page 1 (1974), attached as Supporting Reference 8 of the Appellants’ Supporting References Binder; Ruth Kark, Landownership and Spatial Change in Nineteenth Century Palestine: an Overview, in Transition From Spontaneous To Regulated Spatial Organization, 96 (M. Roscizewsky Ed., 1984) attached as Supporting Reference 9 of the Appellants’ Supporting References Binder; Ruth Kark, The History of the Jewish Frontier Settlement in the Negev 1880-1948, page 33 (2002), attached as Supporting Reference 7 of the Appellants’ Supporting References Binder (hereinafter: “The History of the Settlement“) – I shall parenthetically note that these supporting references, and additional supporting references to which the Appellants referred in their summary arguments, were presented to the court of first instance, contrary the State’s allegation that these supporting references were first submitted at the appeal stage. As shall be specified below, this research does not substantiate the Appellants’ claim that in the years preceding the establishment of the State, the Bedouin were granted autonomy in the Negev which included the authorities’ official recognition of traditional Bedouin law in the sense that the Bedouin were granted property rights in and to the Negev lands.

35.  It emerges from the sources to which the Appellants referred that during the Ottoman period the Ottoman administration perceived the Negev to be an area that is subject to its sovereignty and acted to gain the upper hand over the Bedouin population residing therein. For example, researcher Yasmin Avci states, in her article that was attached as Supporting Reference 10 of the Appellants’ Supporting References Binder, that:

The second half of the nineteenth century was a period when the Ottoman government’s centralization efforts gained momentum. In Southern Palestine, this entailed a struggle for central government to gain the upper hand over the Bedouin tribes. In the 1860’s, the Ottoman government was still using military power to end the internal strife between the Bedouin tribes. However, from the 1890’s on, the government began to use sophisticated means and tactics in order to secure control and encourage the migration of the Bedouin element in the empire. The creation of a new town, namely Beersheba, the changing apparatus of administration, the construction of public buildings in the desert, all meant that the government attempted to penetrate the nomad’s way of life (see Yasmin Avci, The Application of Tanzima in the Desert: the Bedouins and the Creation of a New Town in Southern Palestine (1860-1914), in MIDDLE EASTERN STUDIES, Vol. 45, No. 6, 969, p. 969 (2009))

Prof. Kark wrote similarly in her book, excerpts of which were attached as Supporting Reference 11 of the Appellants’ Supporting References Binder, where Prof. Kark states that:

The Ottoman period reveals a very robust policy on the part of the Ottoman government to gain firm control over the Negev and its nomadic population. Through registration of land, granting land to local sheikhs inside the municipality, establishing a trading center and market place and establishing a permanent military presence and settled villages on the periphery, the Negev was changed dramatically. In addition the seeds for Bedouin sedenterization were sown. (see Ruth Kark and Seth J. Frantzman, The Negev: Land, Settlement, The Bedouin and Ottoman and British Policy 1871-1948, in BRITISH JOURNAL OF MIDDLE EASTERN STUDIES, Vol. 39(1), 53, p. 58 (2012))

The Appellants request to rely on the weakness of the authorities that characterized the Ottoman period with regard to the Negev areas and to interpret it as the granting of autonomy to the Bedouin tribes that resided in that area. However, even if the sources to which the Appellants referred are sufficient to indicate difficulty in controlling this territory, in the absence of explicit evidence to such effect neither the alleged granting of autonomy nor the alleged granting of property rights in and to the Negev areas pursuant to traditional Bedouin law can be inferred therefrom. Such evidence was not presented by the Appellants. It shall be noted that the fact that the sources which the Appellants presented indicate that during the Ottoman period the Bedouin divided the rights in and to the lands of the Negev among themselves, in accordance with traditional Bedouin law, does not constitute sufficient evidence to this end. At most, they are sufficient to prove that at the Bedouin-tribal level there was significance to this division, but they do not prove that it was entitled to official recognition on the part of the Ottoman administration. Thus, the majority of the sources to which the Appellants refer in this context do not at all state that the Ottoman authorities recognized the property rights of the Bedouin that derived from traditional Bedouin law (see Clinton Bailey, Bedouin Law From Sinai And The Negev: Justice Without Government, pp. 263-271 (2009), attached as Supporting Reference 12 of the Appellants’ Supporting References Binder; Chanina Porat, From Wilderness to a Settled Land: Land Acquisition and Settlement in the Negev 1930-1947, on pages 16-17 (1996), attached as Supporting Reference 14 of the Appellants’ Supporting References Binder (hereinafter: “From Wilderness to a Settled Land“)). Some of the sources upon which the Appellants rely explicitly state that the Ottoman administration did not recognize Bedouin ownership of the Negev lands (see Sasson Bar Zvi, The Tradition of Adjudication among the Negev Bedouin – Studies of Encounters with Bedouin Elders, on pages 146-147 (1991), attached as Supporting Reference 15 of the Appellants’ Supporting References Binder). The only source to which the Appellants refer from which such recognition may be implied, is the article by Gideon M. Kressel, Joseph Ben-David and Khalil Abu Rabi’a, Land Ownership Among the Negev Bedouin (Supporting Reference 13 of the Appellants’ Supporting References Binder, on page 41), where the authors state that “after the establishment of Beer Sheva (1903), the official Ottoman institutions recognized the special autonomous arrangements of the Bedouin society, and such recognition is what led to the establishment of the tribal tribunal. […] In hearings that addressed ownership of lots, three [judges] customarily presided…“. However, this general statement is not sufficient to substantiate the Appellants’ claim that the Ottoman administration recognized property rights granted under traditional Bedouin law. In this context it is not superfluous to note that the article’s authors themselves state therein that very little is known about the legal status of the Negev lands at the end of the Ottoman period and that the only information in this matter is indirectly inferred from transactions that the Zionist movement made with the Bedouin regarding such lands (ibid). We shall relate to this below.

36.  The Appellants wish to find support to their claim that the Bedouin were able to acquire rights in and to Negev lands by virtue of traditional Bedouin law in the fact that the Ottoman Empire purchased the lands upon which the city of Beer Sheva was built from the Muhammadeen Tribe (of the Azazma Tribal Confederation). This fact, which was not disputed and was mentioned by the experts on behalf of both of the parties, does not come to the aid of the Appellants, since such purchase does not necessarily attest to the fact that the rights were granted to the Muhammadeen Tribe by virtue of traditional Bedouin law. It is certainly possible that these were rights which were recognized by the Ottoman authorities by virtue of the Ottoman Land Code. For example, collective rights to use Matruka-classified lands for camping and grazing (to which we shall relate more elaborately further below). Support to this position can be found in the fact that the payment that was given to the Muhammadeen Tribe by the Ottoman authorities for the Beer Sheva lands was given to the entire Muhammadeen Tribe and not to certain individuals thereof. To this one must add what is stated in Prof. Kark’s opinion, that in all that relates to the Beer Sheva lands, the Ottoman Empire indeed agreed to pay the Bedouin tribes for purchasing the land, however shortly before then, at the end of the 19th century, Sultan Abdul Hamid II transferred extended areas in the Negev in which Bedouin roamed, to his private ownership, without paying them anything. This leads to the conclusion that the Sultan deemed these lands to be the Ottoman Empire’s property with respect to which he can act as though they were his own (see Prof. Kark’s opinion dated January 31, 2010, Res/C1, on pages 16-17 and the references therein).

37.  In addition to the purchase of the Beer Sheva lands from the Muhammadeen Tribe, the Appellants wish to infer the Ottoman administration’s recognition of rights acquired by virtue of traditional Bedouin law from the fact that Bedouin from the Al-Atawneh Tribe managed to register Negev lands, in an area then called Jemama, in their name and sell them to the Hachsharat Hayishuv company. These lands were later used to establish Kibbutz Ruchama, and according to the Appellants, this proves that the Ottoman administration recognized the Bedouin’s ownership of the Negev lands, and therefore allowed them to register it in their name and to sell it. The Appellants further state in this context that in her testimony Prof. Kark did not know how to provide another explanation to the fact that these lands, which according to her were Mewat-classified lands, were registered in the name of the members of the Al-Atawneh Tribe (see Prof. Kark’s testimony, on pages 51-52 of the minutes of the hearing dated June 23, 2010), and they find this to also reinforce their position.

I am not of the opinion that one can draw such a sweeping conclusion as the Appellants wish to draw from the private case of the Ruchama lands that were sold to the Hachsharat Hayishuv company by the members of the Al-Atawneh Tribe after they were registered in their names. In her book, The History of the Settlement, to which the Appellants refer, Prof. Kark states that the said case is the only case in the Ottoman period in which lands in the Negev were registered in the name of Bedouin and that in that case it was done so as to enable the sale to Zionist institutions after the authorities had raised obstacles in approving the transaction (ibid, on pages 44-45). As mentioned, sweeping recognition by the Ottoman administration of traditional Bedouin law as entitling rights in and to land cannot be inferred from this single case nor can conclusions be drawn therefrom regarding the Lots that are the subject of the claim.

38.  The Appellants’ claim regarding autonomy that was granted to Bedouin in the Negev during the Mandate period also primarily relies on reports that the Mandate government had difficulty controlling the Negev and the Bedouin tribes residing therein. However, as the State mentions, the Mandate government, similarly to the Ottoman administration, also made efforts to gain the upper hand over the Bedouin tribes in the Negev and legislated special laws to such effect, including: The Prevention of Crimes (Tribes and Factions) Ordinance, 1935 and the Bedouin Control Ordinance, 1942. As was already stated, the difficulty of controlling the Negev areas should not lead to the conclusion that autonomy was granted to the Bedouin tribes residing therein, and the fact that the Mandate government applied efforts to effectively control the Negev and the Bedouin tribes residing therein indicates that it perceived the Negev as its sovereign area and not as area in which the Bedouin have control in the form of autonomy. With regard to the Appellants’ claim that the Churchill Declaration constituted a legal autonomy for the Bedouin tribes in the Negev, I agree with the ruling of the court of first instance that it is not clear what Churchill meant when he undertook towards the heads of the Bedouin tribes that their special customs and rights would not be harmed. This is a general and vague statement, and the Appellants did not present any supporting reference that substantiates the far-reaching meaning they wish to attribute thereto. Therefore, the Appellants’ position that at hand is a declaration that grants Bedouin autonomy in the Negev areas cannot be accepted, particularly given that explicit acts of legislation from the Mandate period rule out this conclusion.

39.  The Appellants further refer to Article 45 of the Palestine Order in Council, 1922 (hereinafter: the “King’s Order in Council“) and wish to find support for their claims regarding the autonomy that was granted to Bedouin during the Mandate period. Article 45 prescribes as follows:

The High Commissioner may by order establish such separate Courts for the district of Beersheba and for such other tribal areas as he may think fit. Such courts may apply tribal custom, so far as it is not repugnant to natural justice or morality.

The Appellants wish to infer the alleged autonomy, and the possibility in the framework thereof to acquire title to the Negev lands that was recognized by the Mandate authorities, from the fact that the Mandate authorities allowed the Bedouin, under said Article 45, to operate in accordance with their traditional laws and even to conduct legal proceedings in special courts of their own. This argument is to be rejected. The establishment of the special courts for the Bedouin population and the powers granted thereto were regulated in the Tribal Courts Regulations, 1937 (hereinafter: the “Tribal Courts Regulations“). Regulation 3 of these regulations instructs that these courts may only address disputes that were transferred thereto by the President of the District Court or the District Clerk (a similar provision also exists in Section 3 of the Order Establishing Certain Courts in Palestine, 1924, that was published in the Official Gazette 120, page 764, 1924), and Regulation 6 of these regulations explicitly instructs that “A tribal court is prohibited from deciding on any matter of ownership of land assets, but it is rather permitted to issue such an order that it shall deem fit in the matter of possession of the land assets“. These provisions indicate that the tribal courts that the Mandate government established were meant to settle internal disputes among the Bedouin themselves, if and to the extent such disputes were transferred to them to be ruled upon with the authorities’ approval, but that these courts were not authorized to decide and rule on anything that relates to property rights in and to the Negev lands. Indeed, the regulations indicate that such power was explicitly denied therefrom. Thus, it can be deduced that the Mandate government wished to maintain the power to address matters that relate to ownership of the Negev lands, and this conclusion clearly contradicts the Appellants’ position in this context. The Appellants refer to the judgment in the matter of Ashour Ghandour v. Abdullah Abuo Ghaban, 1 P.L.R. 458 (1929) and claim that it supports their position that the Mandate government recognized the rulings of the tribal courts regarding rights in and to the Negev lands. A review of this judgment indicates that it too does not support this position, and that all that was ruled therein is that the tribal court may address a dispute regarding the possession of land if the dispute was transferred thereto by the President of the District Court.

40.  The Appellants further refer in their arguments to records (notebooks) which, according to their approach, reflect the traditional Bedouin system of ownerships of the land and the manner by which the Bedouin divided the Negev lands among themselves. The Appellants further claim that the Mandate government recognized the validity of these records as records that attest to their rights in and to those lands. The Appellants did not present any evidence that supports their claim regarding the Mandate government’s official recognition of such alleged traditional ownership system, and in this context it is not superfluous to note that the traditional ownership system alleged by the Bedouin with respect to the Negev lands was not the only unofficial system of rights that that was maintained in the country during the years preceding the establishment of the State. During such period there were a number of communities in the country, including: the settlements of the first wave of immigration (the first “Aliya“) and the Templer colonies, which created internal rights registers. However, the Mandate law did not give any consideration to these registers and did not recognize the rights thereunder insofar as they contradicted the Ottoman title deeds or records (see Sandberg, Land Title Settlement in the Land of Israel, on page 161). Similarly, it is difficult to assume, and in any event, it was not proven, that the internal registers that the Bedouin maintained were treated differently. In this context, it is not superfluous to note that the Correction of Land Registers Ordinance of 1926, allowed the abovementioned internal registers to be incorporated into the new register (ibid, on page 164). Such incorporation was not performed with respect to the unofficial internal records which they allege that the Bedouin maintained with regard to the Negev lands.

41.  The Appellants further claim that during the Mandate period the Bedouin registered many parts of the Negev lands in their names in the Land Registry (the “Tabu“) (the Ottoman register that was recognized as the official register by the Mandate government) and sold them to the Zionist institutions, and they argue that this supports their claim that the Mandate authorities recognized the rights that the Bedouin acquired in and to these lands under traditional Bedouin law. The fact that transactions to purchase land in the Negev between Zionist institutions and Bedouin were registered in the Mandate transaction register does not mean that the Bedouin succeeded in registering ownership of the Negev lands or that the Mandate authorities recognized the Bedouin’s rights in and to these lands. The reason being that during the Mandate period, in the case of land that had not undergone a settlement proceeding – and this was the status of the lands of the Negev at such time (and to a great extent, also at the present time) – the land register was only a register of transactions and did not constitute evidence of ownership of the land (see Moshe Doukhan, The Land Laws in the State of Israel on page 147 (Second Edition, 5713) (hereinafter: “The Land Laws in Israel“); Aharon Ben Shemesh, Land Legislation in the State of Israel, on page 261 (1953) (hereinafter: “Land Legislation in Israel“); Sandberg, Land Title Settlement in the Land of Israel, on pages 180 and 188). Section 9 of the Land Transfer Ordinance, 1920, explicitly states as follows regarding this matter:

No guarantee of title or of the validity of the transaction is implied by the consent of the Administration and the registration of the deed. A person acquiring land under this Ordinance will be subject to any registration which may hereafter be introduced by the Government of Palestine …

42.  Thus, the registration in transactions’ register of the transactions that were made by and between Bedouin and Zionist entities with respect to Negev lands only proves that the Mandate officers agreed to register these transactions, and they did so without this obligating them to recognize the validity thereof or the rights that were acquired thereby. This conclusion is supported by the sources upon which the Appellants rely in their arguments. It emerges from these sources that the Zionist entities that purchased the lands from the Bedouin in the Negev were aware of the fact that the Bedouin’s rights in and to the Negev lands were not yet clarified and that it is possible that this would become a difficulty when they requested to register as the owners of the land (see Kark, The History of the Settlement, on pages 58, 76 and 78; see also Porat, From Wilderness to a Settled Land, on page 16). Additional support of this conclusion can be found in various reports of the Mandate government from which it emerges that even though the Mandate authorities recognized the fact that the Bedouin have certain rights in and to the Negev lands, they were of the opinion that these are not rights of ownership of the land, but rather some sort of collective usage rights (such as grazing rights), and ruled that it would not be possible to determine the precise nature of these rights until the completion of the settlement proceeding of the Negev lands. It further emerges from these reports that the British viewed the traditional Bedouin system of ownership of the land as a way in which the Bedouin divide their areas of livelihood among themselves, and not as a system of laws with legal validity. Thus, for example, in a report that was prepared for the Secretary of Colonies in 1930 regarding the matter of the settlement of lands in the Land of Israel, it was written as follows:

One of the problems of land administration in Palestine lies in the indefinite rights of the Bedouin population. […] The majority of these Bedouin wander over the country in the Beersheba area and the region south and south east of it, but they are found in considerable numbers in the Jordan valley and in smaller numbers in the four other plains. Their rights have never been determined. They claim rights of cultivation and grazing of an indefinite character and over indefinite areas. Mr. Shell recorded that they have established a traditional right to graze their cattle on the fellah’s land after the harvest. In region which they regard as their own, they divide the country among their various tribes, and in the tract recognized as the sphere of the tribe, the Sheikhs or the tribal Elders divide the individual plots among the families of the tribe. The position is unsatisfactory. If, for instance, artesian water were discovered in the Beersheba area, there is little doubt that claims would immediately be urged, by the tribes of the Beersheba tract, to the land commanded by that water. The Bedouin are an attractive and picturesque element in the life of the country, but they are an anachronism wherever close development is possible and desired. At the same time their existence cannot be overlooked. In any solution of the Palestine problem, they are an element which must be recognized. Also in any plans of development it will be necessary carefully to consider, and scrupulously to record and deal with their rights (see Report on Immigration, Land Settlement and Development, by Sir John Hope-Simpson, C.I.E., p. 73 (1930) in LAND LEGISLATION IN MANDATE PALESTINE, Vol. 7, No. 3, 27, p. 101 (M. Bunton Ed., 2009) (hereinafter: the “Simpson Report“); see also the Mandate Government’s Letter to the Jewish Agency which was attached as Annex 52 of the opinion of Prof. Yiftachel, on page 3).

The court of first instance rightfully found additional significant evidence that members of the Al-Uqbi Tribe did not consider the internal records upon which they claim the ownership system of the Negev lands allegedly relied to be officially valid in the fact that some of the agreements which the Appellants presented with respect to the Lots included stipulations and undertakings to register the transaction in the Land Registry (the “Tabu“).

43.  Interim summary – the Ottoman administration and the subsequent Mandate government perceived the Negev to be part of the sovereign area that is subject to their control. The conclusion that is drawn from all that which is stated in paragraphs 33-43 above is that the Appellants did not succeed in proving the existence of a legal autonomy for the Bedouin in the Negev during the years prior to the establishment of the State in the framework of which said authorities allowed the Bedouin to acquire property rights in and to the Negev lands by virtue of traditional Bedouin law. Therefore, one must further examine whether, under the Mandate and Ottoman land laws that preceded the Land Law, the Appellants’ family acquired any rights whatsoever in and to the Lots which are the subject of this appeal, for which they are entitled to compensation or to alternative land as a result of their expropriation under the Acquisition Law.

I shall now turn to this question.

The Ottoman Land Code and the Mandate Mewat Ordinance

44.  Section 1 of the Ottoman Land Code (as per the translation of the President of the Mandate Lands Court in Jerusalem, Richard C. Tute), prescribes as follows:

Land in the Ottoman Empire is divided into classes as follows:

(I) ‘Mulk” land, that is land possessed in full ownership;

(II) “Mirie” land;

(III) “Mevqufe” land;

(IV) “Metrouke” land;

(V) “Mevat” land.

(see Richard Clifford Tute, THE OTTOMAN LAND LAWS, p. 1 (1927) (hereinafter: “The Ottoman Land Laws“)

Mulk” is land that is wholly owned by a private individual; “Waqf” is land that was dedicated to G-d; “Miri” is State-owned land, to which a private individual was granted the right of use for certain purposes; “Matruka” is State-owned land, in which the entire public or a certain public was granted collective usage rights for certain purposes; and “Mewat” land is State-owned barren land that was not assigned for anyone’s use (see Frederick M. Goadby & Moses J. Doukhan, THE LAND LAW OF PALESTINE, p. 17, 37, 44, 52 and 69 (1935) (hereinafter: the “Land Laws of Palestine“); Tute, The Ottoman Land Laws, on pages 1-2; Ben Shemesh, Land Legislation in the State of Israel, on pages 28-38; Doukhan, The Land Laws in Israel, on pages 39, 46, 47, 54 and 62; Pliah Albeck and Ran Fleischer, Land Laws in Israel, on pages 40, 47, 68, 79 and 85 (2005) (hereinafter: “Land Laws in Israel“); Eliyahu Cohen, Land Transactions and Registration, on pages 3, 5, 27, 30 and 34 (D. Maimon, Editor, 1988)). The Ottoman Land Code did not create new classes of land but rather only statutorily anchored the land classification that existed across the Ottoman Empire prior to its legislation. However, once legislated, the Land Code defined the various classes of land across the Ottoman Empire in a clear and absolute manner (see Ben Shemesh, Land Legislation in Israel, on page 27). It was not argued, and hence not proven, that the Lots were classified as Mulk or Waqf land. Therefore, the possibilities of classification of the Lets prior to the legislation of the Land Law are narrowed down to the three remaining classes of land (MiriMewat or Matruka). According to the Appellants, the land at hand is Miri-classified land, while the State claims that it is Mewat-classified land. As mentioned, the court of first instance rejected the Appellants’ claim that at hand is Miri-classified land and accepted the State’s claim that at hand is Mewat-classified land. Furthermore, the court of first instance rejected the Appellants’ claim that even if at hand is Mewat-classified land, they acquired rights therein and thereto.

Are the Lots Miri-Classified Land?

45.  Section 3 of the Ottoman Land Code prescribes what Miri land is:

State land, the legal ownership of which is vested in the Treasury, comprises arable fields, meadows, summer and winter pasturing grounds, woodland and the like, the enjoyment of which is granted by government. Possession of such land was formerly acquired of sale or being left vacant, by permission of or grant by feudatories (sipahis) of “timars” and “ziamets” as lords of the soil, and later through the “multezims” and “muhassils”. This system was abolished and possession of this kind of immovable property will henceforward be acquired by leave of and grant by the agent of the Government appointed for the purpose. Those who acquire possession will receive a title-deed bearing the Imperial Cypher. The sum paid in advance (muajele) for the right of possession which is paid to the proper Official for the account of the State, is call the Tapu fee (Tute, The Ottoman Lands Laws, on page 7).

As emerges from the section, Miri land is any land in and to which the government granted possession and usage rights to a private individual. Prior to the legislation of the Ottoman Land Code, the rights of possession and usage in and to Miri land were granted by tenants appointed by the Ottoman administration and the tenants were responsible for collecting taxes in consideration for the use of the land. At some stage the Ottoman authorities reached the conclusion that those tenants were misusing their position and exploiting the farmers who were cultivating the lands for which they were responsible. Therefore, the tenant regime was cancelled and in its stead another regime was instated, pursuant to which the right to use Miri land was granted directly by the State and the taxes in consideration for the use of the land were paid directly to its purse, without the tenants’ brokerage. This change, which is reflected in the provisions of Section 3 of the Ottoman Land Code, was essentially administrative, and did not change the classification of the land that existed prior to the legislation of the law (see Goadby and Doukhan, Land Laws of Palestine, on pages 2-6; Ben Shemesh, Land Legislation in Israel, on pages 12-13, Doukhan, Land Laws in Israel, on pages 34-37; Albeck and Fleischer, Land Laws in Israel, on pages 7 and 237-239; Tute, The Ottoman Lands Laws, on page 8).

46.  We learn from Section 3 of the Ottoman Land Code that in order to prove that at hand is Miri-classified land, it is necessary to demonstrate that it was, at some point in time, assigned by the authorities to the use of a private individual (see Goadby and Doukhan, Land Laws of Palestine, on page 17; Tute, The Ottoman Land Laws, on page 8). Additionally, the section conditions the possession and the use of Miri land upon receipt of a title deed (a Kushan) (see Goadby and Doukhan, Land Laws of Palestine, on pages 17-18; Sandberg, Land Title Settlement in the Land of Israel, on pages 136-137). However, due to the many flaws of the Ottoman registration method, there were in fact Miri lands that were also possessed without a Kushan and without having been registered as such in the old land registers (see CA 87/50 Libman v. Lifshitz, IsrSC 6 57 on pages 91-92 (1952) (hereinafter: the “Libman Case”); Sandberg, Land Title Settlement in the Land of Israel, on pages 147-155; Doukhan, Land Laws in Israel, on pages 367; Goadby and Doukhan, Land Laws of Palestine, on page 271), and in this context it was even ruled that a Kushan or registration in the old land registers, do not constitute conclusive evidence of the existence of rights in and to land (see the Libman case, on pages 91-92; and CA 7210/00 Dana v. The Israel Land Administration, IsrSC 57(6) 468, 476 (2003)).

47.  The Appellants did not at any stage present a Kushan for the Lots or any registration thereof as Miri lands in the old land registers. I am willing to assume that that in and of itself is not sufficient to reject the Appellants’ claim that at hand are Miri lands in and to which they acquired rights. However, in order to prove their claim in these circumstances, the burden lies on the Appellants to demonstrate that the Lots were at some time assigned by the authorities for the use of any of their testators or to any other private individual from whom they acquired the rights therein and thereto.

This burden was not met by the Appellants since none of the evidence that they presented substantiates such a finding. Thus, for example, Prof. Yiftachel attached as Annex 13 to his opinion, two pages from a hand-written chart that according to him were photographed from the IDF Archives, and which relate, inter alia, to the Araqib area (in some of the cases “Aragib” or “Ragib” was stated in the column referring to the “location of the land”). These pages include lists of dozens of persons who cultivated the land, and “Al-Uqbi” or “Uqba” are noted alongside most of them in the ownership column, and it is stated that this is Mulk-classified land (Annex 13). According to Prof. Yiftachel, this table is an Israeli document that attests to the Al-Uqbi Tribe’s ownership of the disputed Lots, and to them having been cultivated, and to the agricultural crops therein. In the heading of the first of the two pages of Annex 13 that were attached to Prof. Yiftachel’s opinion, the words “IDF Archives 1953/233-834” are printed, and it thus prima facie emerges that it is a document that was prepared in 1953. This document does not specify to which years the documentation incorporated therein refers, but given the Appellants’ claim that the Al-Uqbi Tribe was transferred by force in 1951 by the Israeli Military Administration to the Siyagh area (the Beer Sheva, Dimona, Arad triangle), it is clear that it is not documentation that relates to the year in which the document was allegedly prepared. Additionally, it is not clear who prepared the document, for what purpose and in what context, and in any event it is a not an official document that documents the property rights in and to the Negev lands. It does not refer to a private owner and the ownership that is stated therein is to the entire tribe, without relating to specific lots in the Araqib area. Additionally, the document relates to Mulk-classified land, while the Appellants themselves do not raise a claim that the Lots are so classified, and rather claim that they are Miri land. In light of the many question marks that emerge with respect to the two-page Annex 13 of Prof. Yiftachel’s opinion, it appears that it is not possible to conclude therefrom about the assignment of the disputed Lots for the use of the Appellants’ family or for the use of any other private individual. An additional document that was attached to Prof. Yiftachel’s opinion, and from which he wishes to infer that the State of Israel recognized the Lots as land that belongs to the Appellants’ family, is the document that was attached as Annex 14 of his opinion. According to him, this is a certificate of the Development Authority from 1956 in which all of the lots that were expropriated are classified as Miri-classified lands. A review of Annex 14 does not indicate any of that which Prof. Yiftachel wishes to deduce therefrom. It is an illegible copy of a hand-written chart, and it is not clear who prepared it, when it was prepared, and for what purpose, and therefore no evidential weight whatsoever should be granted to this document.

48.  Once we have reached the conclusion that not only did the Appellants not acquire rights in and to the Lots as Miri land, but that no evidence was presented at all by virtue of which it is possible to classify the Lots as Miri to begin with, then, in fact, the need to discuss the additional claim that the Appellants raised – that they acquired rights in and to the Lots by virtue of a period of prescription – becomes superfluous. It shall however be noted, above and beyond that which is necessary, that even if we were to assume that the Lots were Miri-classified land, this would not have come to the aid of the Appellants, because, as the District Court rightfully ruled, they did not prove the existence of the terms and conditions that are required in order to create a claim by virtue of a period of prescription, neither under Section 20 nor even under Section 78 of the law (regarding the terms and conditions prescribed in these sections, and the differences between them, see Pliah Albeck “About Land Limitation Laws in Israel” Kiryat Hamishpat, A 335, on pages 344-350 (5761-2001) (hereinafter: “Land Limitation“); and Albeck and Fleischer, Land Laws in Israel, on pages 207-212; Tute, The Ottoman Land Laws, on pages 23-24 and 75-80; Goadby and Doukhan, Land Laws of Palestine, on pages 257-261; Ben Shemesh, Land Legislation in Israel, on pages 53-65 and 131-134; and Doukhan, Land Laws in Israel, on page 316).

49.  In order to acquire rights under Section 20 or under Section 78 of the Ottoman Land Code (together with Section 22 of the Prescription Law), continuous possession of land for a period of at least 15 years, or 20 years if it began after March 1, 1943, is required. In order to acquire rights under Section 78 it is additionally required that the possession of the land shall be accompanied by significant cultivation thereof by the possessor (see Albeck, Land Limitation on pages 344-350; and Albeck and Fleischer, Land Laws in Israel, on pages 207-212). As shall be clarified below, the Appellants, at most, proved continuous possession of part of the Araqib 2 Lot, from 1936. This possession lasted at most until 1948, when the Al-Uqbi Tribe fought alongside the Arab armies and dispersed, after the State of Israel’s victory, to Gaza and to Jordan (see the testimony of Muhammed Al-Grinawi, on pages 53-55 and 60-61 of the minutes of the hearing dated June 7, 2009; the testimony of Ahmad Abu Siam, ibid, on pages 74-75; the testimony of Ismaeel Muhammed Salem Al-Uqbi, ibid, on pages 89-94 and 102-103; the testimony of Younes Salem Muhammed Al-Uqbi, ibid, page 114; the testimony of Muhammed Al-Asibi, on pages 50 and 55 of the minutes of the hearing dated October 26, 2009; also see the opinion of Prof. Kark dated January 31, 2010, Res/C1, pages 20-22 and the references therein). Therefore, it was not proven that the Appellants’ family possessed the Lots or any of them for the period of time that is required in order to acquire rights by virtue of a period of prescription. Additionally, the Appellants did not succeed in proving that they cultivated the Lots continuously throughout the said required period of time, and as shall be clarified below, at most the Appellants proved partial and interrupted cultivation of some of the Lots in certain years.

50.  In light of additional arguments that the Appellants raised in this context, it is important to emphasize that even if we shall assume for the benefit of the Appellants that the Al-Uqbi Tribe indeed lived and roamed in the areas of the Lots for many years, this fact does not entitle it to rights in and to these Lots by virtue of a period of prescription. Support of this can be found in the judgment of the Mandate Supreme Court in the matter of Village Settlement Committee of Arab en Nufei’at v. Samaonov, 8 P.L.R. 165 (1941) (hereinafter: the “Samaonov Case”), where it was explicitly ruled that the Bedouin lifestyle, in the framework of which Bedouin tribes roam from one tract of land to another, in accordance with the seasons of the years, does not entitle rights by virtue of a period of prescription:

It is clear that grazing and wood cutting are rights which are recognized by the law, but I do not think that their exercise gives any right to the land itself. As to camping, whether or not the pitching of tents on the same spot for many years would give rise to prescriptive rights it is not necessary to determine, as in this case the Settlement Officer found that the tents were pitched in the most convenient and accessible places according to the seasons and occupations followed at time. I do not think that by moving tents hither and thither over a tract of land the owners of the tents can establish prescriptive title to the land.

      An appeal on the judgment in the Samaonov case was filed to the Privy Council, which denied the appeal and ruled that it is inappropriate to interfere in the Mandate Supreme Court’s judgment (see P.C.A. 17/44 The Village Settlement Committee of Arab En Nufei’at v. Aharon Samaonov (1944); also see in this matter, Haim Sandberg, The Land of the State of Israel – Zionism and Post-Zionism, on pages 144-146 (2007)).

Interim summary – The Appellants did not prove that the Lots were Miri-classified Lots. And even had they proven that, it would not have come to their aid, since they did not succeed in proving that they acquired rights therein, not even by virtue of a period of prescription.

Were the Lots Mewat-Classified Land?

51.  As was mentioned, the State claimed that the Lots were and always had been classified as Mewat land, and this claim was accepted by the District Court. In the appeal, the Appellants reiterate their claim that the terms and conditions that are required in order to classify the Lots as Mewat land were not proven, and they further argue that the burden of persuasion in this matter lies on the State due to the fact that it acted with lack of good faith and delayed bringing the conflicting claims that were filed with respect to the Lots before the court to be ruled upon, and thus caused them evidential damage.

This argument was rightfully rejected by the court of first instance.

Section 22 of the Settlement Ordinance prescribes that “The State’s rights in and to the land shall be examined and settled regardless of whether or not they were officially claimed, and any right in and to land that was not proven in the claim of another, shall be registered in the name of the State“. Therefore, the State is not required to prove its rights in and to the land in the framework of the settlement proceedings, and if and to the extent the claimant did not prove that he has rights in and to the land that is being claimed, it shall be registered in the name of the State (see CA 182/54 The Custodian for Absentees’ Property v. David, IsrSC 10 776, 782-783 (1956)). The Appellants’ claim, that the State acted in bad faith by delaying the transfer to judicial ruling of the claims that Appellant 1 filed with respect to the Lots and in doing so caused them evidential damage, lacks substance. First, nothing prevented the Appellants from filing the claims on their own to be examined by the court, as they eventually indeed did in 2006. Second, the State explained that, on its part, it refrained for years from transferring claims to be ruled upon judicially due to a policy of preferring to promote compromise agreements in land settlement claims in the Negev rather than judicial rulings (see the testimony of Ms. Chagit Manos, Claims Controller at the Beer-Sheva Land Rights Settlement Office, page 6, lines 11-12 of the minutes of the hearing dated July 7, 2010). This is a worthy policy in land settlement cases, in general, and in land settlement cases in the Negev, in particular, and therefore, this should not be held against the State (see Sandberg, Land Title Settlement in the Land of Israel, on pages 294-295 regarding the advantages of the approach that prefers a compromise in settlement claims rather than a judicial ruling). In the case at hand, the Appellants rejected various compromise offers that the State raised in accordance with the Israel Land Administration’s decisions before and after the claims were filed thereby with the court (regarding this matter see recent decision 1383 of the Israel Land Council “Land Prices, Compensation and Building Lots for Bedouin in the Negev” (September 29, 2014)).

52.  Did the court of first instance err when it ruled that the Lots are Mewat land? Section 6 of the Ottoman Land Code defines Mewat land:

Dead land (mevat) is land which is occupied by no one, and has not been left for the use of the public. It is such as lies at such a distance from a village or town from which a loud human voice cannot make itself heard at the nearest point where there are inhabited places, that is a mile and a half, or about half an hour’s distance from such (Tute, The Ottoman Land Laws, on page 15)

Section 103 of the Ottoman Land Code further rules in this matter that:

The expression dead land (mevat) means vacant (khali) land, such as mountains, rocky places, stony fields, pernallik and grazing ground which is not in possession of anyone by title deed nor assigned ab antiquo to the use of inhabitants or a town or village, and lies at such a distance from towns and villages from which a human voice cannot be heard at the nearest inhabited place. Anyone who is in need of such land can with the leave of the Official plough it up gratuitously and cultivate it on the condition that the legal ownership (raqabe) shall belong to the Treasury The provisions of the law relating to other cultivated land shall be applicable to this kind of land also. Provided that if any one after getting leave to cultivate such land, and having had it granted to him leaves it as it is for three consecutive years without valid excuse, it shall be given to another. But if anyone has broken up and cultivated land of this kind without leave, there shall be exacted from him payment or the tapou value of the piece of land which he has cultivated and it shall be granted to him by the issue of a title deed (ibid, on page 97).

53.  It emerges from the integration of that stated in these sections, that in order for land to be deemed Mewat, three cumulative terms and conditions must apply with respect thereto: First, that it is not possessed by anyone and was not assigned to anyone by means of a title deed (Kushan) (“is occupied by no one” [Section 6]; “is not in possession of anyone by title deed” [Section 103]); Second, that it was not assigned for public use (“not been left for the use of the public” [Section 6]; “nor assigned ab antiquo to the use of inhabitants or a town or village” [Section 103]); Third, that it is barren and is more than a mile and half (2.2185 km) away from a city or a village (“vacant … land” [Section 103]; “at such a distance from a village or town… that is a mile and a half” [Section 6]; for this matter see CA 518/61 The State of Israel v. Badran,IsrSC 16(3) 1717, on pages 1719-1720 (1962) (hereinafter: the “Badran Case”); see also the Huashela Case, on pages 147-149). The first condition is meant to exclude lands that are possessed by virtue of a Kushan, i.e. Miri and Mulk lands, from the definition of Mewat, while the second condition is meant to exclude lands that were assigned for public use, i.e. Matruka land, from the Mewat lands. The third condition, that the Mewat land must be more than a mile and a half away from a town or a village is meant to exclude grazing lands that are adjacent to villages and are used by their residents, even without having been assigned thereto, and which, as I shall specify below, constitute a type of Matruka (see Tute, The Ottoman Lands Laws, on pages 15 and 97; Doukhan, Land Laws in Israel, on page 48; Albeck and Fleischer, Land Laws in Israel, on pages 68-71; and Ben Shemesh, Land Legislation in Israel, pages 37-38).

As was specified in paragraphs 45-50 above, the Appellants did not prove that at hand are Miri-classified Lots, and did not claim that at hand is Mulk-classified land. Therefore, for the purpose of classifying them as Mewat lands, the first condition that is prescribed in Sections 6 and 103 of the Ottoman Land Code, is met. What remains to be discussed in this context is the fulfillment of the second and third conditions, and for the sake of the convenience of the discussion, we shall first address the question of whether the third condition is met.

The Fulfillment of the Third Condition: The Lots’ Distance from a “Town or a Village”

54.  The Appellants claim that the Lots do not meet the third condition that Mewat land must be more than a mile and half away from a town or a village. According to them, there was an ancient Bedouin town of the Al-Uqbi Tribe on the Lots, and the Al-Uqbi tribe resided thereon and possessed them in a permanent manner. This claim was rejected by the court of first instance, which ruled that it was not proven that the Al-Uqbi Tribe ever resided in the area of the Lots (page 23 of the judgment). This ruling is too sweeping, and justifies our intervention on several grounds. First, it appears that the State neither disputes the fact that the Al-Uqbi Tribe roamed in the areas of the Lots nor the fact that it is possible that it used them during certain periods of time for grazing and camping (see paragraphs 27 and 79 of its summary arguments). Second, it appears that there is no dispute that the cultivations visible in the 1945 aerial photographs were the products of Tribal activity. And third, it emerges from the evidence that was presented, including various sources and testimonies of the Tribe’s Elders, that there is substance to the Appellants’ claim that members of their Tribe customarily roamed in the area of the Araqib Lots (see the testimony of Muhammed Abu Jaber, on pages 4-5 of the minutes of the hearing dated June 7, 2009; the testimony of Younes Al-Uqbi, ibid, on pages 107-108; and the testimony of Muhammed Al-Asibi on page 51 of the minutes of the hearing dated October 26, 2009). It further emerges from the sources to which the Appellants refer that in addition to the Araqib Lots, the Tribe also customarily roamed in the area of the Zahliqa Lots (see Aref Al-Aref, The History of Beer Sheva and its Tribes – The Bedouin Tribes in the Beer Sheva District, on pages 100-103 (translated by: M. Kapeliuk, 2000), attached as Supporting Reference 31 of the Appellants’ Supporting References Binder (hereinafter: the “Bedouin Tribes“); and Yosef Braslavi (Braslavsky) Do You Know The Land, Volume B The Negev Land (The Northern Negev), on pages 270-271 (5716); attached as Supporting Reference 32 of the Appellants’ Supporting References Binder).

55.  However, while it emerges from the evidence stated above that, during certain periods, the Tribe customarily roamed in the area of the Lots, this is not sufficient to substantiate the Appellants’ claim that there existed, simultaneous with the periods in which the Tribe roamed to other places, an ancient Bedouin town in which the Tribe resided in a permanent manner. Contrary to that which was alleged by the Appellants, no physical evidence was found in the Lots that attest to the existence of an ancient Bedouin town at the location. As the court of first instance stated, all of the sites (excluding one) that the surveyor Abu Friecha marked on the map, that the Appellants submitted and that according to them attest to Bedouin settlement in the area of the Lots, are in fact outside of the boundaries of the Lots (see the testimony of Abu Friecha on page 63, lines 12-17 of the minutes of the hearing dated February 24, 2010). Additionally, it emerges from the opinion and the testimony of the interpreter Ben Yosef that, according to the aerial photograph of the Lots from 1945, there is one house in the Lots, on Sharia 133 Lot, with respect to which it was not clarified when it was built and to whom it belonged, and an additional house on the Araqib 2 Lot with respect to which the Tribe’s Elders testified that it belongs to Appellant 1, and the Appellants themselves claim that it was built in 1936, meaning, during the Mandate period (see paragraph 14 of their summary arguments in the Appeal). Other than that, the aerial photograph from 1945 does not include any other characteristics that attest to the existence of a permanent Bedouin town in the area of the Lots. It shall be emphasized that according to the testimony of interpreter Ben Yosef, the water pits and the camps that were sighted in the photograph are all outside of the area of the Lots (see pages 12-17 of the opinion of Mr. Ben Yosef, submitted as Exhibit App/3; and his testimony on page 41, line 21 until page 42 line 8 of the minutes of the hearing dated February 24, 2010). It should be further noted that Ben Yosef clarified in his testimony that, from his experience, the settlement that appears in the 1945 aerial photograph outside of the boundaries of the Lots is also not a permanent, but rather a nomadic settlement (ibid, on page 19, lines 5-6, and page 20, lines 6-12).

56.  The historical certificates and documents upon which Prof. Yiftachel wishes to support his opinion with respect to the existence of an ancient Bedouin town in the area of the Lots, also do not substantiate this conclusion: Annexes 12 and 17 of Prof. Yiftachel’s opinion are a copy of a document that is alleged to constitute a directive of the Military Administration to the members of the Appellants’ tribe to concentrate in the “original location“; Annex 18 of the opinion is a copy of a document that is alleged to be a letter from the office of the Military Governor of the Negev to the Sheikh of the Al-Uqbi Tribe in which he is required to submit a report regarding the lands that are cultivated by the members of the Tribe, and the owners of which are not present within the borders of Israel; Annex 19 is a document that is alleged to be Appellant 10’s school report card from 1950 at the “Bnei Uqbi” School; Annex 22 is a copy of a handwritten note which was allegedly written by the representative of the Military Administration in the Negev, in which he specified the areas that would be handed over to the Tribe “until the members of the Bnei Uqba Tribe return to their lands“; Annex 23 is a copy of a letter which was allegedly sent to Appellant 1 from the Custodian of Absentees’ Property, in which he was required to deliver agricultural produce that belongs to someone else; Annexes 24 and 25 are illegible copies of maps, the original of which is unclear as regards the question of where the Lots of the claim appear thereon, if at all. With respect to the map that was attached as Annex 24, it should be noted that Prof. Kark states in her opinion that the name of the Al-Uqbi Tribe appears thereon at a location that is distant from the Lots, while the names of other tribes are written in the Lots (see Res/C1, on page 17); Annex 30 is a copy of a handwritten letter that was allegedly sent by the Sheikh of the Al-Uqbi Tribe in which he complains about having been taxed twice for the same crops. Other than Annex 18 (which was also submitted as Exhibit App/6 in the Appeal), no translation was attached to any of the Annexes that were specified above and no confirmation or verification was presented with respect to any of the Annexes, attesting that they are authentic documents. In any event, even if I shall assume for the benefit of the Appellants that these are authentic documents, and that the contents thereof are as they are alleged to be, none of these documents substantiates the existence of a permanent Bedouin town in the area of the Lots (and in this context, also see Prof. Kark’s reference to the annexes that were mentioned in pages 17-18 of her opinion (Res/C1).

57.  An additional document upon which Prof. Yiftachel relies in support of the claim regarding the existence of a Bedouin town on the Lots, is a list of the names of places in Palestine that the Mandate government published in 1940 (A Gazetteer of Place Names Which Appear in the Small Scale Maps of Palestine and Trans-Jordan (1940); Annex 56 of his opinion; hereinafter: the “Names List“). The name of a place called El-Araqib appears in this list. The Appellants did not bother to attach an expert opinion that clarifies whether the coordinates appearing next to the name El-Araqib on the Names List corresponds with the actual locations of the Lots or of any of them. However, even assuming that the location appearing in the Names List as El-Araqib is located in the area of the Lots, this list does not support the claim that this it is a permanent town. To the contrary. In the prologue to the Names List it is written that this list also specifies unsettled places that appear on the map. It is further stated in the prologue that the notation “Vill.Unit” will appear alongside places that are officially recognized by the government as a town (a ‘Village Unit’) for tax and administration purposes, along with a notation of the area of the town and an estimation of the number of residents residing therein. It is evident that such a notation does not appear in the list alongside the name “El-Araqib” nor is its area nor the number of residents residing therein stated with respect thereto. All that is stated alongside the name “El-Araqib” on the list is that it is a “locality”, a note that does not necessarily indicate that it is a settled area (regarding this matter, see Prof. Kark’s testimony on page 110-114 of the minutes of the hearing dated May 6, 2010). An undated list of tithe tax payers (Annex 35 of the opinion), which is mentioned in Prof. Yiftachel’s opinion as an additional document that supports his position that there was an ancient permanent Bedouin town on the Lots, also does not attest to this. Prof. Yiftachel states that “El-Araqib” is written in that document in the column designated for specifying the town. However, this alone is not enough to draw a conclusion that a permanent Bedouin town existed at that location, especially given the fact that the other evidence that we reviewed thus far, does not support this conclusion. Therefore one can assume that the words “El-Araqib” were meant to describe the area of the crops for which the tithe tax was collected pursuant to such list, and the existence of a permanent town on the Lots cannot be inferred therefrom. An additional piece of evidence upon which Prof. Yiftachel supports his claim regarding the existence of a permanent town in the Lots is a voter’s notice which was sent to Appellant 1 in 1949, upon which “El-Araqib” was written in the slot designated for specifying the “name of the city or the village” (Exhibit App/7 in the Appeal). As was already noted, Appellant 1 built his house on the Araqib 2 Lot in 1936, and therefore it can be assumed that the voter’s notice stated “El-Araqib” for the purpose of identifying the location where he resides. However, one house is not a town, and the existence of a town cannot be inferred from one voter’s notice. Therefore, this document also does not substantiate the claim that the Appellants raised in this matter.

58.  Hence, the documents and the sources upon which Prof. Yiftachel relied are not sufficient to substantiate the Appellants’ claim regarding the existence of a permanent Bedouin town on the Lots. A similar conclusion also emerges from the testimonies of the Tribe’s Elders that the only permanent characteristic that appears at the site is Appellant 1’s house on the Araqib 2 Lot, (see the testimony of Muhammed Abdalla Abu-Jaber on pages 4-17 of the minutes of the hearing dated June 7, 2009; also see the testimony of Elayn Muhammed Al-Grinawi, ibid, on pages 43-47; the testimony of Ahmed Jachada Abu Siam, ibid, on pages 53-65; and the testimony of Muhammed Al-Asibi, on pages 42-52 of the minutes of the hearing dated October 26, 2009, who in their testimonies do not mention any characteristic, other than Appellant 1’s house, of permanent settlement in the Lots). Some of the witnesses testified as to the existence of houses and water pits that were dug in the area of the Araqib Lots (see, for example, the testimony of Younes Salem Muhammed Al-Uqbi, on page 112 of the minutes of the hearing dated June 7, 2009). However, considering the fact that in the aerial photograph from 1945 no houses or water pits are seen within the boundaries of the Lots, and considering the fact that according to the Appellants themselves, the Tribe lived and roamed in a wide tract of land of 19,000 dunam, it can be assumed that the pits to which these witnesses refer are located outside of the area of the Lots. It should be further noted that contrary to Prof. Yiftachel’s claim that there was a school building on the Araqib Lots where the Tribe’s children studied, it emerges from the testimonies of the Tribe’s Elders that there was no school on these Lots: Witnesses Ismaeel Al-Uqbi and Muhammed Al-Asibi testified that the schooling took place at Appellant 1’s house on the Araqib 2 Lot (see page 89 of the minutes of the hearing dated June 7, 2009, and pages 45-46 of the minutes of the hearing dated October 26, 2009), while witnesses Muhammed Al-Grinawi and Younes Salem Muhammed Al-Uqbi testified that the children of the Tribe did not study in the Araqib area at all but rather in neighboring villages (see pages 73 and 112 of the minutes of the hearing dated June 7, 2009).

59.  In contrast, and as the court of first instance stated, in the framework of Prof. Kark’s opinion the State presented abundant evidence attesting to the fact that there never was a permanent Bedouin town on the Lots and to the fact that the Lots were not cultivated between 1858 and 1921. The claims raised by the Appellants against Prof. Kark’s opinion cannot be accepted, and contrary to that which is alleged by them, her opinion does not exclusively rely on the writings of researchers who travelled the Negev in the past but rather on a wide variety of reliable sources, including: land surveys, historical maps and various official certificates that relate to the area of the Lots from which it emerges that the Lots were not settled and cultivated between 1858-1921. Fault should not be found in Prof. Kark’s reliance on the reports of various researchers who travelled in the Negev during the previous centuries (with respect to an expert’s reliance of professional literature, see CrimA 889/79 Hemo v. The State of Israel, IsrSC 36(4), 479 (1982), in paragraph 13 of the judgment of Justice M. Ben Porat), and as the court of first instance rightly stated, Prof. Yiftachel also extensively relied on the reports of various western researchers who passed through the Negev during the last centuries, insofar as they supported his arguments. As is recalled, the court of first instance preferred Prof. Kark’s opinion over that of Prof. Yiftachel’s based on the reasons that were specified above in the chapter that describes its judgment, and we have not found it appropriate to intervene therewith, both because this is a matter in which an appeal instance does not customarily intervene (see, for example, CA 4126/05 Chagazi v. Amutat Va’ad Edat Hasfaradim (June 20, 2006), in paragraph 11; CA 5131/10 Azimov v. Binyamini (March 7, 2013), paragraph 12), and because we have found that in the case at hand the underlying reasons justify this preference.

60.  Due to all of the reasons upon which we have elaborated above, it is to be ruled that although the Al-Uqbi Tribe roamed in the area of the Lots and used them during certain periods of time for camping, grazing and seasonal agriculture, there was no permanent town of the Tribe on the Lots, neither at the time the Ottoman Land Code was legislated (1858) nor thereafter. Therefore the Appellants’ claim that with respect to the Lots, the third condition among the conditions prescribed in Sections 6 and 103 of the Ottoman Land Code for the purpose of classifying lands as Mewat is not met, is to be rejected. However, the Appellants do not suffice with the claim that was rejected regarding the existence of a permanent town. In the alternative, they further claim that said third condition is not met, even if there was no permanent town in the area of the Lots in the relevant years, since it is sufficient that the Tribe maintained nomadic settlement at the location for the condition prescribed in Sections 6 and 103 of the Ottoman Land Code, that Mewat land must be more than a mile and half away from a city or a village, to not be fulfilled. They further claim that even if the Lots were barren and not settled at the time of the legislation of the Ottoman Land Code, this does not mean that they are Mewat lands, since the examination of the Lots’ distance from a town should be done at the time the land settlement proceedings take place. According to them, the interpretation that the land’s classification is determined at the time of the legislation of the Ottoman Land Code and remains set from that time onwards is not logical, and a reasonable interpretation of the Ottoman Land Code should consider the changes that occurred over the years in the area of the Lots. The Appellants are aware of the fact that these claims were rejected in the past by this court, which ruled that the location of a town pursuant to Sections 6 and 103 of the Ottoman Land Code is only a permanent town and also a permanent town that existed at the time of the legislation of the Ottoman Land Code (see the Badran Case, on page 1720; the Huashela Case, in paragraph 4 of the judgment of Justice A. Chalima; and CA 55/63 Suaed v. The State of Israel, IsrSC 20(2) 3 (1966)). However, the Appellants claim that this interpretation is erroneous and discriminatory and they request that it be revisited.

61.  After reviewing the arguments raised by the Appellants in both of these matters, I reached the conclusion that it is inappropriate to change the precedents from the Badran Case and in the Huashela Case regarding the type of settlement to which the third condition, that is prescribed in Sections 6 and 103 of the Ottoman Land Code for the purpose of classifying Mewat land, relates, nor with respect to the effective date for the examination of the distance between the land being classified and the location of a town.

In the translation by Tute and Ben Shemesh of Sections 6 and 103 of the Ottoman Land Code, the term “city or village” was used, and this is also the case in the translation by Doukhan of Section 6 (see Tute, The Ottoman Land Laws, on pages 15 and 97; Ben Shemesh, Land Legislation in Israel, on pages 37 and 147; and Doukhan, The Land Laws in Israel, on page 466; however in his translation of Section 103 of the Ottoman Land Code, Doukhan uses the term “town”: ibid, on page 480). It is difficult to see how a nomadic settlement can be seen as “city or village.” As the State notes, the Bedouin lifestyle was not foreign to the Ottoman legislator, and it appears that if it had been its intention to include nomadic Bedouin settlement among the towns for which the surrounding lands are not deemed Mewat lands, it is presumed that it would have used the appropriate terms to do so and not terms that clearly describe permanent settlement. The purpose that the Appellants attribute to the Ottoman legislator in this context was also not proven at all. According to them, nomadic Bedouin settlement should also be included among the definition of the towns with respect to which the surrounding lands are not Mewat, because the legislator wanted “to encourage people to cultivate lands that are distant from towns” (paragraph 38 of their summary arguments). This claim does not bear any substance, and is actually contrary to the purpose for which Section 103 of the Ottoman Land Code was legislated, to which I shall refer below, which was meant to incentivize cultivating and reviving Mewat land that was distant from places of settlement and which, for example, was used for nomadic settlement, by allowing the person who revived Mewat land to acquire rights therein and thereto.

62.  The Appellants wish to find support for the interpretation they suggest in the fact that the Village Administration Ordinance, 1944, the Mandate Settlement Ordinance, and the Settlement Ordinance that replaced it, define the term “village” also as a “tribal area”. One cannot simply carry the definition of the term “village” in acts of legislation of the Mandate government and of the State of Israel, that were intended for different purposes, to the distinct context of interpreting the Ottoman Land Code. As the State mentions, the definition of the term “village” in the acts of legislation to which the Appellants refer was meant for administrative purposes and did not determine substantive rights in and to land. Therefore, it appears that there is no foundation for the interpretation the Appellants suggest for Sections 6 and 103 of the Ottoman Land Code, relying upon these acts of legislation. Additionally, it emerges from various official publications of the Mandate government that even it interpreted the terms “city or village” in Sections 6 and 103 of the Ottoman Land Code as relating only to permanent towns. Thus, in an official notice that the Mandate government published on November 10, 1921, regarding “Determining the Boundaries of the Government’s Lands” (published in the Official Gazette 56, page 9, 1921) it was stated that a committee shall be established to determine and mark the borders of the Government’s lands in the country. In Section 4 of the notice it was written that “all of the abandoned lands, with respect to which there are no title deeds and which were not delivered to the residents of any place or village, and that are at such a distance from the last house of the place or village from which a human voice cannot be heard, shall be marked by the committee as Mewat lands” (my emphasis; ibid, on page 10). Hence, even the Mandate government did not consider nomadic settlement as a town for which the adjacent lands are not Mewat lands.

63.  As mentioned, an additional claim that the Appellants raised is the claim that the date when the status of the land should be examined for the purpose of its classification under the Ottoman Land Code is that date when the settlement proceedings take place and not the date when the law was legislated. This claim is also to be rejected. Contrary to Miri lands, for which the Ottoman legislator made sure to prescribe provisions that arrange their status upon the change of the nature of the land (see, for example, Sections 5 and 6 of the Law of Possession of Real Estate from 1331 of the Hijra (1913) and Sections 44, 82 and 89 of the Lands Code; for more on this matter see Goadby and Doukhan, Land Laws of Palestine, on pages 29-32; and Tute, The Ottoman Land Laws, on pages 2, 6-7 and 169-170), similar provisions were not prescribed for Mewat lands. Therefore, there is no reference in the Ottoman Land Code to the impact of the expansion of towns or of the establishment of new towns on the classification of the lands adjacent thereto. Tute wrote about this as follows:

The Land Code (vide Art. 31) did not contemplate the extension of the inhabited sites which were in existence when it was passed. It was not therefore foreseen that the extension of those sites would create difficulties. Their rapid growth in recent years brings them continually nearer to the former Mewat area, and, under the definition we are discussing, must result in a progressive curtailment of that area. The process, at the same time, brings into existence an indeterminate class or land, which was formerly Mewat. On this area which is neither Mewat, Mirie, nor assigned pasture, squatters are likely to settle, against whom the present law gives the State no rights, other than those conferred by a strict enforcement of the prohibition of building contained in Art. 31. Such land cannot regarded (under Art. 105) as unassigned pasture, because, ex hypothsi, it lies outside the boundaries of any town or village (Tute, The Ottoman Land Laws, page 16).

Further on, he adds as follows:

The Code does not contemplate any great extension or the village sites which existed when it was framed (Vide art. 31). Of late years the sites of many towns and villages have, however, been greatly extended, and new inhabited-sites have been formed. This means that the limits or the Mewat have retreated with the advance or habitation. The process results in the creation of intermediate land which cannot be brought under any of the classes dealt with by the Code. As the rakaba of such land has never been transferred it apparently remains with the State. It might however be held that, under the conditions referred to, the boundaries of towns or villages adjoining the Mewat must be held to enlarge with the area reachable by the human voice. Whatever view is taken the result is that the Mewat lands of the State are being steadily reduced by the subtraction or areas which, are often of great and increasing value. Legislation is clearly required to deal with the situation. (ibid, on page 98).

64.  Despite Tute’s position that the land created as a result of the expansion of the towns that existed at the time of the legislation of the Land Code towards the area of the Mewat lands is of an undefined class, it appears that it can be classified by means of interpretational principles which the Mandate courts applied when they dealt with such issues. Indeed, a situation in which certain land does not precisely correspond with one of the land definitions existing in the Ottoman Land Code, was quite common in the law that preceded the Land Law (see Ben Shemesh, Land Legislation in Israel, on page 27). In order to deal with this difficulty, the Mandate Supreme Court in Cyprus ruled in the matter of Kyriako v. Principal Forrest Officer, 3 C.L.R. 87 (1894) (hereinafter: the “Kyriako Case”) that in the event in which certain land does not precisely meet any of the land definitions existing in the Ottoman land legislation, the law that is most suitable should be applied thereto, and it should be classified as the class of land to which it is closest (ibid, on pages 94-95). According to Goadby and Doukhan, such land will generally be classified as Mewat (see Goadby and Doukhan, Land Laws of Palestine, on page 45; and see Doukhan, The Land Laws in Israel, on page 48).

It thus emerges that any land, which at the time of legislation of the Ottoman Land Code (1858) was Mewat land and was more than a mile and half away from a permanent town, shall generally continue to be deemed Mewat land and that the expansion and development of the towns in the years following the promulgation of the land legislation cannot change this. This is the case unless the land became a different class of land by way of revival or assignment by the authorities, pursuant to the provisions of the Ottoman Land Code.

In the case at hand it was proven that the Lots were not cultivated and were not near a permanent town when the Ottoman Land Code was legislated. Since the establishment of new, and particularly nomad, towns in their vicinity cannot change the classification relevant at the time of the legislation of the Ottoman Land Code, it is sufficient that the Lots were more than a mile and half from the site of a permanent town on the effective date in order to meet the third condition that is prescribed in Sections 6 and 103 of the Ottoman Land Code, for their classification as Mewat land.

The Fulfillment of the Second Condition: Are the Lots Not Matruka Land ?

65.  Once we have ruled that the third condition that is prescribed in Sections 6 and 103 of the Ottoman Land Code is met with respect to the Lots, it remains to be examined whether the second condition that is required in order to classify the land as Mewat – that it is not land that was assigned or left for public use, i.e. that it is not Matruka land – is met.

Section 5 of the Ottoman Land Code defines Matruka land as follows:

Land left for the use of public (metrouke) is of two kinds: –

(I) That which is left for the general use of the public, like a public highway for example;

(II) That which is assigned for the inhabitants generally of a village or town, or of several villages or towns grouped together, as for example pastures (meras) (Tute, The Ottoman Land Laws, page 14)

      The section distinguishes between two types of Matruka land: that which was “left” to the public and that which is assigned for the use of the inhabitants of a certain city or village. According to Tute, the difference in the terminology between the sections indicates that Matruka land for the use of the general public can become such by being left to the general public to be used even without it being explicitly assigned for its use. By contrast, Matruka land that is intended for the use of a specific population can only become Matruka land by way of explicit assignment by the authorities (ibid, on page 14 and 100; also see Goadby and Doukhan, Land Laws of Palestine, on page 56). This approach was rejected by the Mandate Supreme Court and also by this court which ruled that Matruka land that serves a specific public can also be created by way of an implied assignment if it was left to be used by that public, and there is no obligation that there by an explicit assignment by the authorities for such purpose (see Abu Hana v. The Attorney General, 5 P.L.R. 221, p. 224 (1938); CA 4/50 The Attorney General v. The Tel Aviv Municipality, IsrSC 5(1) 725, 726-727 (1951); CA 673/85 Peki’in Local Council v. The State of Israel, IsrSC 42(3) 627, 631-632 (1988) (hereinafter: the “Peki’in Case”)). As to the duration of the use of the land that is required in order for it to be considered Matruka, it was ruled that it is necessary to demonstrate use over such a long period of time that no one remembers when it began (ibid, and also see CA 24/57 Malakh v. Jandekalo, IsrSC 12 757 (1958), in paragraph 3 of the judgment of Deputy President S.Z. Cheshin). It was additionally clarified that use that began in our generation cannot be considered use ab antiquo, which can entitle collective rights of usage in and to land (see CA 504/61 The State of Israel v. The Tel Aviv-Jaffa Municipality, IsrSC 16 872, 875 (1962) (hereinafter: the “Tel Aviv Municipality Case”)). According to the interpretation of the Mandate Land Court when examining the duration of the use, each case must be examined as per its circumstances, however it is difficult to assume that use that is less than 100 years can entitle collective rights of usage in and to land (see Government of Palestine v. Village Settlement Committee of Sajad and Qazaza, 2 C.O.J. 672, p. 676 (L.C. Jaffa, 1933) (hereinafter: the “Qazaza Case”)). It was further ruled that the entitling use must be continuous and that different uses in different periods cannot be deemed one continuous use which has the power to make land become Matruka (see the Tel Aviv Municipality Case, on page 875; the Peki’in Case, on page 632; and CA 438/70 The Umm Al-Fahm Local Council v. The State of Israel, IsrSC 26(1) 813, 816 (1972)). It was additionally ruled that the use that creates Matruka land that was assigned to a specific public must be exclusive to such public, and if others could have also benefitted from the land in the same manner that the specific public claiming rights could have, it should not be deemed as land that was assigned for the use of that specific public (see the Tel Aviv Municipality case, on page 875, and the Peki’in case, on page 632).

66.  The Ottoman Land Code refers to a variety of public uses of Matruka land, such as: public roads, vehicle parking, gathering cattle, markets, granaries, worship areas, wood-chopping area and grazing areas (see Sections 91-101 of the Ottoman Land Code). The use relevant to the case at hand is grazing rights. The code distinguishes in this matter between grazing lands that were assigned ab antiquo to a specific public (Sections 97 and 101) and grazing lands (Section 105) that are within the boundaries of the village and that serve its residents for grazing even without having been assigned thereto (see Tute, The Ottoman Land Laws, on pages 92-94 and 100 regarding the said distinction between the types of grazing lands. Also see Tute’s approach, ibid on page 14, that lands that comply with the definition of the category of Section 105 of the code, are Mewat lands). Section 97 of the Land Code entitles the residents of the village to an exclusive right to graze their herds in areas that were assigned to them and to prevent strangers from doing so. By contrast, under Section 105 the residents of the village are only entitled to a right to graze in the areas that are adjacent to their village without paying taxes therefor, but it does not allow them to prevent strangers from grazing in these areas. Furthermore, while the grazing rights under Section 97 are protected against both private individuals and against the State, grazing rights under Section 105 do not prevent the State from expropriating the land or granting it to any person as Miri land (see The Attorney General v. Village Settlement Committee of El Maqaibla, 8 C.O.J. 485 (L.C. Nablus, 1935); and Tute, The Ottoman Land Code, on page 96). Section 101 refers to seasonal (summer and winter) grazing rights and it is unique in that in addition to use for grazing purposes, it also allows cultivating the lands with the consent of the residents to whom grazing rights were assigned. Section 101 indeed uses prohibitory language, and provides that one cannot cultivate the lands listed therein without the consent of the residents to which they were assigned. However it can be inferred that upon the consent of the residents, they can be cultivated (see Tute, The Ottoman Land Laws, on pages 95-96). With regard to Matruka lands that are designated for grazing under Section 101, Tute writes that it can be presumed that the Bedouin are the ones that have a special interest in the option of cultivating the land in addition to the grazing rights. In his words:

It may be presumed that the persons chiefly interested in the provisions of this article are members of the Bedouin tribes, who wander in search of pasture and water, and do a little sporadic cultivation when the rainfall permits (ibid, on page 96)

67.  Indeed, the possibility that various parts of the Negev lands were left ab antiquo for the use of various Bedouin tribes for purposes of camping, grazing and seasonal agriculture emerges from the evidence that was presented in this proceeding, and the possibility that the said Lots were also left for such use of the Al-Uqbi Tribe as Matruka lands, cannot be ruled out. However, the Appellants did not claim this in the court of first instance or in the appeal, and the relevant facts were not sufficiently examined or clarified in the framework of the discussions in this proceeding. In any event, even if the Appellants were able to substantiate an argument regarding the Lots being Matruka lands that had been left for the use of the Al-Uqbi Tribe under Section 101 of the Ottoman Land Code, this would not have aided the Appellants in any way, since rights in and to Matruka land are always collective rights and the Ottoman Land Code prohibits private individuals to acquire rights of their own in and to lands of such classification (see Goadby and Doukhan, Land Laws of Palestine, on pages 54-55). Section 101 of the Ottoman Land Code even explicitly provides that:

These summer and winter pastures cannot be bought and sold, nor can exclusive possession of them be given to anyone by title deed … (Tute, The Ottoman Land Laws, page 95).

The Ottoman Land Code further prescribes that it is not possible to use Matruka land for any purpose other than that for which it was assigned. Additionally, it was prohibited to turn the right to public use of Matruka land into private rights, and it is not possible to transfer the rights that were granted therein and thereto to private hands by way of distribution, sale or transfer. Additionally, it is not possible to acquire rights in and to Matruka land by virtue of a period or prescription (see Section 102 of the Ottoman Land Code; and Tute, The Ottoman Land Laws, on pages 15, 89, 93 and 96; Ben Shemesh, Land Legislation in Israel, on pages 164-174; Albeck and Fleischer, Land Laws in Israel, on pages 86-87). For these reasons, the classification of the Lots as Matruka lands, even if they were to be classified as such, does not in any way advance the matter of the Appellants who claim to have private rights in and to such Lots.

68.  In any event, the Appellants did not claim, and obviously did not prove, that the Lots were Matruka land. Therefore, and to the extent that this relates to the proceeding at hand, the second condition prescribed in Sections 6 and 103 of the Ottoman Land Code for the purpose of classifying the Lots as Mewat land, is also met. However, even given this conclusion, it is still necessary to examine the Appellants’ alternative argument that if, and to the extent it shall be ruled that, at hand are Mewat lands, they acquired rights in and to these Lots by virtue of the cultivation and revival thereof, pursuant to Section 103 of the Ottoman Land Code and the Mewat Ordinance.

Cultivation and Revival of Mewat Land

69.  Section 103 of the Ottoman Land Code indeed allows acquiring rights in and to Mewat land by virtue of its cultivation and revival, and prescribes that a person who revived Mewat land with the authorities’ permission shall receive a Kushan therefor, without consideration. Similarly, a person who revived Mewat land without permission by the authorities shall pay the value thereof and thereafter shall be given a Kushan therefor. In the past, prior to the legislation of the Land Code, a person who revived Mewat land with the authorities’ permission received it as fully owned Mulk. The Ottoman Land Code cancelled this option and thereafter Mewat land that was revived is inhabitable only as Miri (see Ben Shemesh, Land Legislation in Israel, page 148; Tute, The Ottoman Land Laws, on page 99). The Mandate courts ruled that in order to acquire rights in and to Mewat land by virtue of revival, continuous and effective cultivation thereof which leads to a clear and permanent change in its quality, is required (CA 226/42 Kirkorian v. The Attorney General, 10 P.L.R. 302, p. 304-305 (1943) (hereinafter: the “Kirkorian Case”); CA 153/46 Habbab v. Government of Palestine, 14 P.L.R. 337, p. 341 (1947) (hereinafter: the “Habbab Case”); also see Goadby and Doukhan, Land Laws of Palestine, pages 48-49; Doukhan, The Land Laws in Israel, on pages 51-52; Sandberg, Land Title Settlement in the Land of Israel, on pages 125-128). It was further ruled that the mere revival of land does not turn it into Miri and that it is necessary to such end to submit an application to register the land in the name of the reviver (see the Kirkorian Case, on page 304 and Doukhan, The Land Laws in Israel, on page 52).

This was the state of affairs until 1921, when the Mandate government legislated the Mewat Ordinance. This ordinance prescribes that anyone who revived Mewat land without the authorities’ permission, not only will not receive rights therein and thereto, but will be considered a trespasser and shall be subject to punishment. In this manner the Mewat Ordinance cancelled the possibility of acquiring rights in and to Mewat land by virtue of reviving it without the State’s permission. As to the revivals that were effected prior to its legislation, the ordinance prescribed a period of two months from the date of its publication during which a person who revived Mewat land without permission may report this to the register officer and request that the land be registered in his name. It should be noted that de facto, the Mandate authorities applied a lenient approach and agreed to recognized revivals that were effected before 1921 even if they were not reported within the period of time that the Mewat Ordinance allocated (see Goadby and Doukhan, Land Laws of Palestine, on page 47; and Doukhan, The Land Laws in Israel, on page 50).

70.  In order to substantiate their argument that they acquired rights in and to the Lots by virtue of cultivation and revival pursuant to Section 103 of the Ottoman Land Code, the Appellants would have had to first prove that their family cultivated the Lots continuously and effectively before 1921. Second, the Appellants would have had to prove to that the family approached the register officer pursuant to the Mewat Ordinance and requested to receive a registration certification of the Lots in their name by virtue of such cultivation and revival, and that they received such a certificate. The court of first instance examined the evidence that was presented thereto and ruled that the Appellants did not prove this. As a rule, the appeal court does not tend to intervene in factual rulings and reliability findings of the court of first instance, except in extraordinary cases of a conspicuous error, relating to evidence presented or to ignoring evidence which could change the conclusion the court of first instance reached (see CrimA 8146/09 Avshalom v. The State of Israel, paragraph 19 (September 8, 2011)). In the matter at hand, the Appellants claim that the court ignored evidence and many testimonies that were presented thereto which could lead to a different conclusion in the matter of the cultivation and the revival. Therefore, we were of the opinion in this case, and even only for the sake of caution, that it is appropriate to examine the entirety of the evidence to which the Appellants referred in this context. However, even after examining all of the evidence we are of the opinion that the conclusion reached by the court of first instance, that the Appellants failed to prove cultivation and revival of the Lots as Mewat lands at the relevant times, nor the existence of a registration certificate that was issued in the name of any member of the family under the Mewat Ordinance by virtue of said cultivation and revival, should remain unchanged.

71.  Prof. Yiftachel, the expert on behalf of the Appellants, states in his opinion that “The lands that are claimed at El-Araqib and Zahliqa […] are only a small part of wide areas that are estimated, according to oral testimonies, to be approximately 19,000 dunam, that were possessed and cultivated by the [Al-Uqbi] Tribe, during the first half of the 20th century” (page 11 of the opinion). However, the Appellants did not present any objective evidence that attests to the fact that their family cultivated the Lots in dispute before 1945. In his opinion, Prof. Yiftachel states that these Lots were cultivated by the Al-Uqbi Tribe ab antiquo and he substantiates this based on various sources from which it emerges, in a general manner, that the Negev lands were cultivated by Bedouin tribes, and on sources from which it emerges that the Lots at hand are located in areas in which the Al-Uqbi Tribe customarily roamed. The earliest document which was attached to Prof. Yiftachel’s opinion, and which according to him relates to the Lots, is a receipt that relates to the years 1927-1928 for the payment of tithe taxes (Annex 6 of this opinion). Prof. Yiftachel further claims that the tax was paid for agricultural product from harvests on the Araqib Lots (three of the six Lots in dispute), which were cultivated by the Appellants’ family. The Appellants did not bother to attach a true and correct translation of the writing in the said receipt, but the examination thereof shows that the receipt form does not even have a slot in which the area relevant to such agricultural produce is to be stated and specified. Therefore, it cannot be ruled that the said receipt indeed relates to agricultural produce from the Araqib Lots (compare with the Huashela Case, on pages 153-154). This is the case even if we ignore the fact that at hand is only one receipt and the fact that this receipt is from 1927, meaning, six years after the effective date in the Mewat Ordinance (1921), after which it was no longer possible to acquire rights by virtue of Section 103 of the Ottoman Land Code through cultivation and revival. Additional evidence that Prof. Yiftachel presented of the cultivation of the Lots by the Appellants’ family are: a receipt of payment of tithe tax from 1950, which was also alleged to have been issued for taxes that were paid for agricultural produce from the Araqib Lots (Annex 19 of the opinion), and two additional receipts for payment for plowing, also from 1950 (Annex 21 of the opinion). Similar to the receipt from 1927, these receipts also do not state to which areas they refer, and in any event, given the fact that they relate to 1950, they cannot substantiate the Appellants’ claim regarding cultivation and revival of the Lots in the years that preceded 1921.

Prof. Yiftachel further attaches two lists of tithe tax payers to his opinion. One, which allegedly relates to the Araqib Lots, does not bear a date (Annex 35 of the opinion), and the other, which allegedly relates to the Zahliqa Lots (Sharia 133 and Sharia 134 Lots), which are adjacent to the Sharia 132 Lot, bears the date of September 22, 1937 (Annex 36 of the opinion). Due to the quality of the photocopy, and in the absence of a translation or an explanation regarding the contents of such documents, it is very difficult to understand what is said therein. From the little that was legible, it is not possible to reach the conclusion that Prof. Yiftachel reached regarding the Appellants’ family’s alleged continuous cultivation of the Lots which are the subject of the hearing during the relevant years.

72.  Additional documents which were attached by Prof. Yiftachel as Annex 13 of his opinion (two pages from the IDF Archives), also do not substantiate the cultivation and revival claim for the reasons specified in paragraph 47 above, where we addressed these documents in another context, and it is not necessary to reiterate what was stated. Additionally, Prof. Yiftachel sought to rely on aerial photographs of the Lots from 1945 and 1949 in order to substantiate the cultivation and revival claim. With respect to the aerial photograph from 1945, it emerges from Prof. Yiftachel’s opinion, and from the testimony and opinion of interpreter Ben Yosef, that a certain part of the Lots was indeed cultivated in that year. In the absence of a contradicting argument, I am willing to assume that the cultivation was effected by the members of the Al-Uqbi Tribe. An opinion of an interpreter was not attached to the aerial photograph from 1949, and in light of its poor quality it is difficult to infer anything therefrom. Therefore, we have at most a piece of evidence of cultivation of a certain part of the Lots in 1945, and this too is not intensive cultivation that covers the majority of the area of the Lots, as Prof. Yiftachel claims. The court of first instance elaborated on this when it addressed the testimony of interpreter Ben Yosef and said that the picture that emerges from his testimony is entirely different from the one that Prof. Yiftachel tried to portray. In the court’s words:

An entirely different picture emerged, of very partial cultivation [of the Lots], to say the least. Thus the percentage of cultivation in Araqib 6 is 21%, in Araqib 60 at a rate of 5%, where only 3 dunams are arable, the rest being the a channel of a river, ravines where no cultivation is possible at all, not even for grazing. He adds that 10% of the Araqib lands are unusable ravines. With regard to lot 6 he states that most of the area was expropriated by the military and military posts are stationed thereon. In Araqib 2, the entire area is being cultivated (page 26-27, 51). It is not clear from this data as to how Prof. Yiftachel saw intensive cultivation covering most of the Araqib lots – puzzling. The conclusion is that no basis of evidence has been presented of intensive cultivation, also not in 1945 (paragraph 19 of the judgment).

These conclusions of the court of first instance are well substantiated and it is inappropriate to intervene therein.

73.  The Appellants further refer in their arguments to the testimonies of the Tribe’s Elders and object to the fact that the court of first instance ignored these testimonies and did not attribute proper consideration thereto. A review of such testimonies indicates that it is difficult to substantiate the conclusions that the Appellants are trying to reach thereupon, since they are very general and sweeping testimonies with respect to the cultivation of the Lots in dispute which do not contain any precise identification of the Lots or of the years of cultivation or of the nature of the cultivation. As to the continuity of the cultivation, some of those witnesses confirmed that every few years there was a draught year in the Negev during which it was not possible to grow harvests in the ground (see, for example, the testimony of Muhammed Al-Grinawi, pages 52-53 and 62 of the minutes of the hearing dated June 7, 2009; the testimony of Ahmed Abu-Siam, ibid, on page 81; the testimony of Ismaeel Al-Uqbi, ibid on page 86; the testimony of Muhammed Al-Asibi, on pages 43 and 61 of the minutes of the meeting dated October 26, 2009). These testimonies correspond with that which is stated in Mandate government official reports, such as the Village Statistics of Palestine from 1945 (attached as Annex 54 of Prof. Yiftachel’s opinion; hereinafter: the “Village Statistics“), where it was written that:

The Beersheba sub-district has been inhabited from time immemorial by the Bedouin tribes of Palestine who cultivated what areas they were able to depending on the amount of rainfall in a given year. Furthermore, it should not be forgotten that Arab practices have been to rotate cultivation, that is, land cultivated one year are left fallow for one or two subsequent years because of lack of fertilizer and sufficient rainfall (ibid, on page 35)

      Similar words were written in a letter dated March 13, 1937, that the Mandate government sent to the Jewish Agency regarding the Jewish settlement in the Negev lands (Annex 52 of the opinion; hereinafter: the “Mandate Government’s Letter to the Agency“), in which it was written that the Bedouin in the Beer Sheva region cultivate their lands only in “favorable seasons” (ibid, on page 3). Therefore, the testimonies of the Tribe’s Elders regarding cultivating lands in the Araqib area, even if we were to attribute them to the Lots, relates at most to certain years that were not explicitly defined. In any event it is not possible, from these testimonies, to draw the conclusion of continuous and effective cultivation in the relevant years, as required in order to prove the condition of cultivation and revival that grant rights in and to Mewat lands by virtue of Section 103 of the Ottoman Land Code. In this context it is not superfluous to note that contrary to the position of Prof. Yiftachel that the Bedouin engaged in agriculture ab antiquo, it emerges from Prof. Kark’s opinion and from the sources that were presented that this was a gradual and relatively late development. For example, Aref Al Aref, the historian and governor of the Beer Sheva District during the Mandate period, writes that “The Bedouin had extended periods of time during which they had no interest whatsoever in land. Moreover, they looked down on anyone connected with working the land, because they perceived that as a disruption and a distraction to the life of wandering and brigandage. It is possible that the foundation of their hatred of farmers and their lifestyle can be found here. However, at present [1933] the situation has changed and the Bedouin have begun leaning towards agriculture” (see Aref Al Aref, The Bedouin Tribes, attached as Supporting Reference 31 of the Appellants’ Supporting References Binder and cited on page 10 of Prof. Kark’s opinion dated January 31, 2010, which was submitted as Exhibit Res/C1).

74.  It emerges from the analysis of the evidence specified above that Prof. Yiftachel does not rely in his opinion on any objective evidence whatsoever that indicates that the Lots were cultivated by the Appellants’ family before 1945. However, even if I shall assume, for the benefit of the Appellants, that the receipts, the tax records, the aerial photographs and the rest of the testimonies and documents that were presented can prove the cultivation of the Lots in certain years, this is not sufficient to meet the condition of continuous and effective cultivation before 1921, as required under Section 103 of the Ottoman Land Code and under the Mewat Ordinance, in order to acquire rights in and to Mewat lands. Furthermore, even had the Appellants proven that they cultivated and revived the Lots before 1921, they would have had to further prove, as stated above, that they approached the register officer under the Mewat Ordinance within the time that was prescribed therein and requested to be registered as the owners of the Lots by virtue of said cultivation and revival, and that their said request was granted. The Appellants did not prove any of the above. This is sufficient to deny the Appellants’ alternative claim that if it shall be found that the Lots are Mewat lands, the Appellants’ family acquired rights therein and thereto by virtue of cultivation and revival. The Appellants are aware of this difficulty and therefore they further argue that the Mewat Ordinance was not applied to the Negev areas, and therefore, according to them, its provisions should not be considered when addressing the matter of the rights they acquired in and to the Lots by virtue of cultivation and revival. This argument is to be rejected since, as was already mentioned, the Mandate government perceived the Negev as area that is subject to its sovereignty, to which the laws it legislated, including the Mewat Ordinance, apply.

The Appellants further argue in this context that the Mewat Ordinance was not de facto implemented, and that the Mandate government allowed the acquisition of rights in and to Mewat lands by virtue of cultivation and revival, without the authorities’ permission, even after the legislation of the Mewat Ordinance in 1921. They refer in this matter to Mandate case-law rulings that support their said approach. However, a review of these judgments reveals that they do not support the Appellants’ claim: the judgments in the Habbab Case and in the Kirkorian Case addressed lands that were revived prior to 1921, and in the Kirkorian Case, the application to register the land in the name of the possessors was even filed within the time prescribed in the Mewat Ordinance. In the Habbab Case, the application was indeed not filed in time but since the register officer was willing to address it, the court ruled that it does not find it appropriate to be punctilious with the Appellants in this matter; the Genama Case also addressed land that was allegedly revived without the authorities’ permission prior to 1921 and the ordinance’s provisions were applied in that case; the judgment in the Debbas v. The Attorney General, 1 A.L.R. 205 (1943) also addressed land that was revived by the appellants therein and the Mandate government agreed to grant them rights therein and thereto in consideration for the payment of its value, even though they did not meet the conditions of the Mewat Ordinance. The settlement officer was of the opinion that since the Mewat Ordinance cancelled the appellants’ right to receive rights in and to the land by virtue of revival, he was not permitted to approve the settlement by and between them and the government. The Mandate Supreme Court ruled that the Mewat Ordinance does not deny the settlement officer’s authority to approve the agreement that the government made with the appellants.

Thus the Mewat Ordinance was binding and was implemented in the Mandate case rulings, inter alia, in respect to the Negev areas.

75.  An additional claim that the Appellants raise in an attempt to overcome their inability to present a registration certificate with respect to the Lots in accordance with the Mewat Ordinance, is the claim that Section 2 of the Mewat Ordinance should be interpreted in a manner that does not deny the rights of a person who revived Mewat land to acquire rights therein and thereto and to register them in his name, even upon the lapse of the two month period that was allocated in that section. According to the Appellants, the said Section 2 indeed prescribes that any person who revived Mewat land without the authorities’ permission must notify the register officer of this within two months from the date of publication of the ordinance and must submit an application to register the land in his name. However, so the Appellants claim, the section does not prescribe that a person who does not do so loses the rights he acquired in and to the land by virtue of revival. The Appellants find support for their claim in the fact that Section 2 of the Mewat Ordinance was omitted from the publication of the ordinance in the “Drayton” Compilation of Mandate Acts of Legislation. The interpretation of the Mewat Ordinance that is suggested by the Appellants was not accepted by this court, which explicitly ruled that any person who revived Mewat land prior to the publication of the Mewat Ordinance, but did not submit an application to register his rights at the date prescribed therein, is not entitled to register the land in his name. For example, it was ruled in CA 298/66 Kassis v. The State of Israel, IsrSC 21(1) 372 (1967), that:

In 1921 the Lands (Mewat) Ordinance was legislated, and granted a last opportunity to receive a Kushan on Mewat land, which had been revived earlier, by giving notice within two months from the date of publication of the ordinance. In the above CA 518/61 [1] it was explained that anyone who missed this time, can no longer benefit from registration of Mewat land in his name in a settlement, even if he revived the land prior to 1921, and even Section 54 of the Lands (Settling Property Rights) Ordinance will not come to his aid, since according to the last part of that section it does not apply to Mewat land. (ibid, on page 375; also see the Badran Case, on page 1721; and the Huashela Case, on page 147; also see Tute, The Ottoman Land Laws, on pages 16 and 98; Doukhan, Land Laws in the State of Israel, on page 49; Ben Shemesh, Land Legislation in Israel, on page 148; Albeck and Fleischer, Land Laws in Israel, on page 74).

As to the matter of the omission of Section 2 of the Ordinance from the Drayton Compilation of Acts of Legislation – no interpretational significance whatsoever should be attributed to this since an ordinance entitled the Revised Edition of the Laws Ordinance (No. 2), 1934 appears in the said compilation of acts of legislation and states various sections which shall be omitted from certain acts of legislation that are published in that compilation, including Section 2 of the Mewat Ordinance. However, this ordinance further rules that the said omission shall not derogate from the validity of the sections that were omitted.

76.  Finally it shall be noted that it is not possible to acquire rights in and to Mewat lands by virtue of a period of prescription (see Goadby and Doukhan, Land Laws of Palestine, on page 263; Tute, The Ottoman Land Laws, on page 16; and Albeck, Land Limitation, on page 344). Therefore and given the conclusion that according to the evidence that was presented in this proceeding, the Lots are Mewat land, the claim of prescription will also not come to the Appellants’ aid.

Did the Appellants Acquire Rights in and to the Lots by Virtue of Other Laws?

77.  All of the reasons specified above lead to the conclusion that the Appellants did not acquire rights in and to the Lots by virtue of the Mandate and Ottoman land laws which entitle them to compensation for their expropriation in 1954. Did the Appellants acquire rights in and to the Lots by virtue of other laws? In this context, the Appellants wish to lean on three systems of laws and claim that they generate rights in and to the Lots; one – the laws of equity; two – international law; and three – the basic laws. I shall begin by stating that I did not find that any of these laws support the Appellants’ claim regarding acquiring rights in and to the Lots.

The Laws of Equity

78.  The laws of equity are a legal doctrine originating from common law. This doctrine is meant to add rules and rights to written law, which are meant to prevent situations in which the application of the letter of the law leads to an unjust result that does not do justice with the spirit of the law and the principles of natural justice (see John Mcghee, SHELL’S EQUITY, p. 4 (13th Edition, 2000)). The laws of equity were imported into our law by means of Article 46 of the King’s Order-in-Council, which prescribes that the Ottoman legislation and the Mandate government’s ordinances “shall be exercised in conformity with the substance of the common law, and the doctrines of equity in force in England.” In accordance with that stated in Article 46 of the King’s Order-in-Council, the Mandate courts, and the Israeli courts following their lead, applied the laws of equity in various fields, including in the field of land law (see, for example, Farouqi v. Ayoub, 4 P.L.R. 331, P. 339-338 (1937) ), which was delivered following the judgment of the King’s Council, in P.C.A. Faruqi v. Aiyub, 2 P.L.R. 390, p. 394 (1935)); For Israeli case-law that applies the laws of equity, see CA 400/67 Howard v. Melamed, IsrSC 22(1) 100 (1968); and for Israeli case las that applies the laws of equity in the field of land law, see, for example, CA 528/66 Stern v. The Lot 36 in Block 6127 Company Ltd., IsrSC 21(2) 342 (1967) (hereinafter: the “Stern Case”); and FH 30/67 Stern v. Stern, IsrSC 22(2) 36 (1968)).

In 1969 the Israeli Lands Law was legislated, with Section 161 entitled “Denial of Equity Rights” which prescribes that “From the commencement of this law, there is no right in and to land except under law“. In light of this provision, generally speaking, the application of the laws of equity in the field of land law came to an end (for a sweeping denial of equity rights in and to land, see LCA 178/70 Boker v. Anglo-Israel Management and Responsibility Company Ltd., IsrSC 25(2) 121 (1971), and for a certain softening of this case-law rule, see CA 189/95 Bank Otzar Hahayal Ltd. v. Aharonov, IsrSC 53(4) 199 (1999); see also in this matter Miguel Deutch, “The Fall (?) and Rise of the Equitable Right in Israeli Law: The Law in the Wake of Reality” Tel Aviv University Law Review (Iyunei Mishpat) 24(2) 313 (2000)). Having said that, it is important to note that in light of the provision of Section 44(a) of the Settlement Ordinance that provides that in the framework of settlement proceedings “The court will rule in accordance with the land laws that are in effect at the time of the discussion, and shall consider the rights in and to the land both in accordance with the law and in accordance with equity“, the English laws of equity have maintained a certain hold in Israeli law in this context.

79.  In the case at hand, the Lots were expropriated in 1954, meaning, prior to the legislation of the Land Law. According to the Appellants, if and to the extent their arguments regarding acquiring rights in and to the Lots pursuant to the Mandate and Ottoman laws shall be rejected, at the very least they possessed, at such time, rights by virtue of the laws of equity by virtue of the possession of the Lots and their alleged cultivation for years. As was already noted, the Appellants did not claim any compensation or alternative land by virtue of the Acquisition Law, but once we have ruled that the Lots were duly expropriated in 1954, even if the Appellants’ argument for rights by virtue of equity laws shall be accepted, at most it can lead to the conclusion that the Appellants are entitled to compensation or to alternative land by virtue of the Acquisition Law for the expropriation of the Lots. However, the Appellants’ claim that they acquired rights by virtue of equity laws cannot hold. As was specified above, the equity laws were meant to realize the spirit of the law and to lead to a just result in cases in which there is a lacuna or another legislative mishap. However, an equity right is not created ex nihilo and is not established when the alleged right contradicts an explicit provision in law. The Mandate Supreme Court elaborated on this in the Qazaza Case, ibid, on page 675, stating as follows:

It is perfectly true, as the Settlement Officer states, that an equitable right cannot be established in contradiction to the clearly expressed provisions of substantive law, or, in other words, that Equity cannot create a right that the Law prohibits.

Given the provisions of the Mewat Ordinance and the provisions of the Ottoman Land Code, upon which we elaborated above, which provide that the Appellants’ alleged rights of ownership of the Lots is rejected, they do not have any such right by virtue of the laws equity (compare CA 525/74 Issa v. The State of Israel, IsrSC 29(1) 729, 732 (1975)).

The International Law Regarding the Rights of Indigenous People

80.  According to the Appellants their rights in and to the Lots should be recognized by virtue of international law regarding the rights of indigenous people, either by way of interpreting the Mandate and Ottoman land laws and the evidence laws in accordance with the principles of international law which, would entitle them to such rights, or by way of recognizing their rights in and to the Lots by virtue of the principles of international law, even without linkage to such laws.

This argument is also to be rejected.

First, in order for a norm that originates in international law to be of binding validity it must be anchored in customary or treaty-based international law (see CA 24/48 Shimshon Batei Charoshet Eretz Yisraeliim Lemelet Portland Ltd. v. The Attorney General, IsrSC 4 143, 145-146 (1950) (hereinafter: the “Shimshon Case”); HCJ 69/81 Abu Eita v. The Commander of the Judea and Samaria Region, IsrSC 37(2) 197 (1983), in paragraph 12 of the judgment of the Deputy President (as was his title at the time) M. Shamgar (hereinafter: the “Abu Eita Case”)). Second, if and to the extent the matter relates to norms that originate in treaty-based international law, it has been ruled that they are not binding unless they were adopted by or incorporated into an internal act of legislation (see CA 439/76 Histadrut Maccabi Israel, Merkaz Kupat Cholim Maccabi v. The State of Israel, IsrSC 31(1) 770, 777 (1977)). Third, with respect to norms that originate from customary international law, it is necessary to demonstrate that they are accepted and recognized by many countries in the world, to such an extent that no civilized country could ignore them (see the Shimshon Case, on page 146; the Abu Eita Case, in paragraph 12 of the judgment of Justice M. Shamgar; CrimA 336/61 Eichmann v. The Attorney General, IsrSC 16 2032, 2040-2041 (1962)), and it is necessary to demonstrate that there is no Israeli act of legislation that contradicts it (see HCJ 769/02 The Public Committee Against Torture in Israel v. The Government of Israel, IsrSC 62(1) 507 (2006), in paragraph 19 of the judgment of the (Ret.) President A. Barak; LCA 7092/94 Her Majesty the Queen in Right of Canada v. Adelson, IsrSC 51(1) 625 (1997), in paragraph 11 of the judgment of President Barak). The burden of proof “regarding the existence of a custom that has the characteristics and the standing, as described […] lies on the party claiming it exists” (the Abu Eita Case in paragraph 14(b) of the judgment of the Justice M. Shamgar), and in the case at hand, on the Appellants.

81.  In all that relates to treaty-based international law regarding the rights of indigenous people, the State of Israel has not joined the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples of 2007, to which the Appellants referred, and did not adopt it in internal Israeli legislation. In any event, the declaration cannot come to the aid of the Appellants since declarations of the United Nations General Assembly do not have any binding force (see South West Africa, Second Phase, judgment, I.C.J. Reports 1966, p. 6, para. 98 pp. 50-51) and the Appellants did not refer to any international convention or international treaty that recognize the rights of indigenous people, and in any event it was not alleged that the State of Israel adopted such a convention or treaty. Additionally, no evidence was presented that the Mandate government or the Ottoman Empire recognized rights by virtue of indigenousness or adopted international norms, if and to the extent such existed, in acts of legislation in the relevant years. In other words, the Appellants did not prove the existence of a past or present binding norm in treaty-based international law that impacts their rights in and to the Lots. Additionally no binding norm was proven to exist in the past or at present under customary international law. The Appellants refer in their arguments in this context to an Australian judgment (Mabo v. Quinsland (No. 2) (1992) H.S.A. 23, 175 C.L.R.). This judgment also does not come to the Appellants’ aid. First, the Australian judgment is not sufficient to meet the required burden for substantiating the argument regarding the existence of a binding international norm under customary international law (with respect to the burden of proof regrading customary international law, see the Abu Eita Case, in paragraph 14 of the judgment of Justice M. Shamgar). Second, the Australian judgment recognized collective rights of an indigenous tribe in and to their lands, while in the case at hand the Appellants are claiming the Lots for themselves and claim to private ownership therein. For this reason as well the example is not relevant to the issue at hand. In light of this conclusion there is no need to address the various arguments that the parties raised regarding the question whether or not Bedouin qualify for the term “indigenous“.

Rights Under the Basic Rights

82.  According to the Appellants, the Mandate and Ottoman land laws that preceded the Land Law should be interpreted in the spirit of the basic laws and in accordance with constitutional principles of equality and protection of property. In the spirit of these principles, so the Appellants argue, their rights in and to the Lots should be recognized. Indeed, the approach that the basic laws serve as interpretational tools even with respect to legislation to which the preservation of laws paragraph applies is well grounded in the rulings of this court (and see recently in CA 5931/06 Husein v. Cohen (April 15, 2015)). However, the Appellants’ argument that the Mandate and Ottoman legislation should be interpreted in the spirit of the basic laws is flawed by its generality, and the rights that the Appellants are requesting by virtue of this claim do not coincide with the explicit provisions that are relevant to the case at hand in such legislation, upon which we elaborated above. Interpretation in the spirit of the basic laws is not a magic formula that can create rights ex nihilo, as President A. Barak has already said:

It is necessary to recognize that not in every case can a law be given a dynamic interpretation. It is not always possible, by way of interpretation, to adjust the law to the new social reality. There also are laws that have a “firm” purpose […] In these laws there is no option for dynamic interpretation. A loyal interpreter gives these laws an interpretation that will accord with their purpose at the time they were legislated (see Aharon Barak, Interpretation in Law – Statutory Interpretation, Volume 2, pages 272-274 (5743); and regarding the interpretation of the Acquisition Law, see and compare, the Jabareen Case, in paragraph 35 of the judgment of Justice Y. Danziger)

      It is undisputed that the matter of the Bedouin tribes’ rights in and to the Negev lands is a weighty matter for which a solution must be found, to the satisfaction of all of the parties, and the sooner that happens, the better. However, for the reasons specified above, the basic laws cannot impact explicit Mandate and Ottoman land legislation in a manner that creates property rights ex nihilo. Therefore the solution to this matter – a fortiori when the matter relates to private rights the Appellants are claiming – is not to be found in this channel.

Epilogue

83.  Due to all of the reasons specified above, I shall suggest to my colleagues to reject the Appellants’ arguments insofar as they relate to the validity of the 1954 expropriation of the Lots pursuant to the Acquisition Law. Additionally, I shall suggest to my colleagues to reject the Appellants’ arguments that relate to the rights they acquired in and to the Lots, whether by virtue of traditional Bedouin laws or by Mandate and Ottoman land legislation, or pursuant to the laws of equity, international law and the basic laws. I shall further suggest to my colleagues to rule that in light of these conclusions, the Appellants are not entitled to compensation or to alternative land under the Acquisition Law, due to the expropriation of these Lots.

If and to the extent my suggestion shall be accepted, we shall deny the appeal and consequently cancel the interim relief that was granted on May 6, 2013. However given the circumstances of the matter, I would further suggest to my colleagues that we not issue an order for expenses.

                                                                                                      JUSTICE

Justice S. Joubran:

I agree with the thorough judgment of my colleague Justice E. Hayut, and heartily join in her call to find a solution to the matter of the Bedouin tribes’ rights in and to the Negev lands (paragraph 82 of her judgment). The State should act promptly to find a way in which it will be possible to settle their rights in and to such lands.

                                                                                                      JUSTICE

Deputy President E. Rubinstein:

a.       I concur with the exhaustive and informative opinion of my colleague, Justice Hayut, who examined the issues of the appeal based on material from near and far, and from which much can be learned about the development of the land laws in the country since the Ottoman period and about their implementation in the Negev; both by the abundance of sources therein and in furtherance of the detailed judgment of the court of first instance (Deputy President Dovrat). It is regretful that the attempts to reach a compromise, which we encouraged, were not successful.

b.      The issues that arise in the judgment and in those similar thereto are among the most complex ones in the relations between the State of Israel and the Bedouin in the Negev and they began even before the establishment of the State. The legal situation which my colleague described in detail is suffused with these complexities. I share her conclusions and the need for solutions, and as is known, the State has, presently and in the past, applied various efforts that focused on the establishment of Bedouin towns and on other paths, but they have not been completed; also see just recently LCA 3094/11 Alkiyan v. The State of Israel (May 5, 2015), paragraphs w – x regarding the solutions that were proposed for the matter of the Bedouin settlement in the Negev and the supporting references there, including The Report of the Committee for Proposing Policy to Regulate the Settlement of Bedouin in the Negev (the Justice Goldberg Committee, 5769-2008), and the implementation efforts.

c.       It is not superfluous to note that problems that were encountered in the early years of the State also emerge at present (see, inter alia, C. Porat “The Development Policy and the Matter of Bedouin in the Negev in the State’s Early Years, 1948-1953” Reflections on the Resurrection of Israel (Iyunim Betkumat Yisrael), 7 (5757-1997), pages 389, and particularly 436-438; Havatzelet Yahel “Land Disputes between the Negev Bedouin and Israel”, Israel Studies 11(2) (2006), 1-22, and additional supporting references that were presented by my colleague in the Alkiyan Case; also see Arieh L. Avneri, The Jewish Settlement and the Claim of Dispossession (1878-1948) The Tabenkin Institute for Studies of the Kibbutz and the Labor Movement, 5740 pages 189-192, regarding the acquisition of lands in the Negev in the 1930’s and 1940’s, including the nature of the lands and the identity of the sellers, while stating that the bulk of the land that was acquired in the Negev was barren and inferior, and generally without tenants; also see ibid, pages 215-216, regarding the Negev development plan that was proposed in 1937. Also see G. Biger, A Multi-Bordered Land, The First One Hundred Years of Delineating the Borders of the Land of Israel, 1840-1947 (5761-2001) 212; David Ben-Gurion, The Renewed State of Israel A (1969), on pages 557-558, which describes the hopes for the development of the Negev to which he was especially devoted, and as is known he moved to Sdeh Boker as part of a message to the public. It appears that it emerges from the literature that the essence of the Bedouin experience was nomadic, and not “ordinary”, agriculture, even if there were exceptions, and we carefully listened to the Appellants’ arguments. Also see D. Ben Gurion The War Diary (The War of Independence) edited by G. Rivlin and E. Orren (5743-1982) B 525; and in another context see The War Diary A, 75). Having said that, it is clear that the ambition that the State develop the Negev for the benefit of the entire public, does not contradict the need to attend to the matter of the Bedouin and their rights.

d.      Regarding the adoption of customary and treaty-based international law by Israeli law, also see, in addition to the sources that my colleague presented, T. Broude “The Status of International Law in Domestic Law”, in International Law by R. Sabel with the participation of other authors (2nd ed. 5770 – 2010), pages 71-75 and the supporting references there; also see R. Sabel “Citizenship and Human Rights” ibid, 205, 211.

e.       The settlement of the matter of the Bedouin in the Negev remains on the agenda and the problems have not ended, but the path to a solution, including with respect to the Appellants, is in the spirit of that which is stated in my colleague’s opinion; and one must hope that material and good-will solutions, will be found in a respectful manner and while applying broad mutual perspectives; see my paper “The Equality of Minorities in a Jewish and Democratic State” Zehuyot 3 (5773 – 2013) 141, 143-146.

Deputy President

It was decided as stated in the judgment of Justice E. Hayut.

Delivered on this 25th day of Iyar, 5775 (May 14, 2015).

THE DEPUTY PRESIDENT            JUSTICE                    JUSTICE

=============================================================

Tuesday, July 2 2002תעאיוש בארץ המחסומים – מאמר מכתב העת בעיות ישראליות

פורסם בערבית בכתב-העת בעיות ישראליות (רמאללה), כרך 6, קיץ 2002

גדי אלגזי וחררדו לייבנר

תעאיוש בארץ המחסומים

تعايش  في بلاد المحاسيم

“נתקלתיواجهث
במחסומים בדרכיםحواجز في الدروب
הראיתי את התעודהوابنت تذكرتي
וחיפשו בידי ובכלי.وفُتش في يدي وفي جيوبي
חשתי כזרاحسست احساس الغريب
שנקלע לעיר נוכרית.”يدبّ في بلد غريب.*
“אני מן הדרום”. טקסט: חסן אלעבד אללה, לחן: מרסל ח’ליפה.شعر: حسن عبد الله; الحان: مرسيل خليفه

1.

כאשר הרמטכ”ל הימני ביותר שהיה לצה”ל מאז הימים החשוכים של רפאל איתן חוזר ואומר, שישראל לא יכולה להגיע להסדר עם הנהגה פלסטינית בראשות יאסר ערפאת, אין הוא מבטא רק את דעתו האישית או את שאיפותיו להתמקם בימין לקראת פרישתו מן הצבא וכניסתו הרשמית לפוליטיקה. קיצוני ככל שיהיה, דבריו של מופז מייצגים את הלך הרוח הדומיננטי באליטה הבטחונית הישראלית. אותה אליטה בטחונית, אשר קידמה בזמנו את פרויקט אוסלו, נסוגה ממנו כעת. “חומת מגן” והכניסות הבלתי-פוסקות של צה”ל לשטחים מצביעות בבירור על המגמה של חזרה לשלטון כיבוש ישיר על כלל השטחים. בכיוון דומה מצביע גם הנסיון למסד את משטר המחסומים וההגבלות על חופש התנועה בתוך הגדה באמצעות הנפקת אישורי מעבר בין המובלעות הפלסטיניות. זהו ניסיון לקיים שלטון כיבוש דה-לוקס: דיכוי ישיר, עם אופציה מתמדת לנהוג כריבון אלים בכל נקודה בגדה (וזו אחת המשמעויות של הפלישות הישראליות החוזרות לשטח המוקטעה), אך ללא כל נטילת אחריות על החיים האזרחיים, על הכלכלה, הרווחה, הבריאות ומערכת החינוך. הממסד המדיני-בטחוני הישראלי מבקש לשלוט בחיי היומיום של הפלסטינים באמצעות אישורי מעבר ומגבלות, אך לא לשלם אגורה לשם קיום התשתית האזרחית.

עידן אוסלו מת בתום תקופת הסדרי הביניים, כאשר ההנהגה הישראלית, למרות מאמציה, לא הצליחה לכפות על התנועה הלאומית הפלסטינית הסדר קבע שהיה תפור ליעדיה: שמירה על קונצנזוס פנים-ישראלי מינימלי (השארת גושי התנחלויות), המשך השליטה האסטרטגית (מים, גבולות חיצוניים, וטו על שיבת הפליטים, פירוז) ושליטה כלכלית ניאו-קולוניאלית (אזורי תעשייה ממושטרים עתירי עבודה זולה לאורך הגבול ותכתיבי מכס ומסחר). עם זאת, ברור לכולם שאף גורם רציני באליטה הבטחונית הישראלית איננו רואה את המצב הנוכחי או את החזרה לכיבוש ישיר מלא של הגדה והרצועה כאפשרויות ריאליות, בנות קיימא לטווח הבינוני והארוך. ההכבדה הנוכחית בכיבוש נועדה להשיג “הכרעה”, שמשמעותה ייצוב ארוך-טווח של יחסי הכוחות הנוכחיים. בתוך הממסד הפוליטי והבטחוני, נמשכת המחלוקת בשאלה, איזה הסדר כפוי ניתן לייצב? כאן מתחדש הויכוח ההיסטורי העתיק בין הפלגים השונים של המימסד הישראלי: מה עדיף, מקסימום שטח או מינימום ערבים?

אלה שמטרתם העליונה היא “מינימום ערבים”, מעלים כעת הצעות רבות להפרדה חד-צדדית “נדיבה”, הפרדה בטחונית שכרוכה בנסיגה מ”התנחלויות מבודדות”, היערכות צבאית סביב גושי ההתנחלויות וב”מרחב התפר”, כלומר מספר קילומטרים מזרחית לקו הירוק. במקרה זה, כמה אלפי מתנחלים יצטרכו להתפנות, כשצ’קים נדיבים ותשומת-לב תקשורתית רבה מרפדים את דרכם. אך את עיקר המחיר ישלמו עשרות אלפי כפריים פלסטינים, הנמצאים בתחום גושי ההתנחלות או במרחב התפר. קווי ההפרדה יותוו כך שמקומות היישוב עצמם יהיו בשליטה פלסטינית, אך רוב האדמות יהיו חלק מ”מרחב התפר” או יסופחו לגוש ההתנחלויות הקרוב. כך תושג המטרה: מירב האדמה עם מינימום תושבים. זהו ההקשר שבו יש לראות את הכתר הנמשך וההתעללות היומיומית השיטתית בתושבי כפרים ועיירות רבים באזור “קו התפר” (למשל באזור טול-כרם, קלקיליה וסלפית). הם נועדו לערער את אחיזתה של האוכלוסייה הפלסטינית באדמתה ולבודד אותה כדי להחליש אותה. אם מהלך הנסיגה החד-צדדית יתבצע בעיצומה של שפיכות דמים גדולה ופעולות צבאיות נרחבות, הנסיגה המתוקשרת – ביטוי מובהק לנכונות הישראלית הידועה לפשרות – עלולה להתבצע תוך כדי עקירה של כפרים שלמים או הפקעת קרקעותיהם של אחרים.

בעלי הגישה הטריטוריאלית מעדיפים למשוך את המצב הקיים ככל הניתן, תוך הרחבת ההתנחלויות בשקט וחיזוקן. מבחינתם האידיאל הוא ליצור אפרטהייד דה-פקטו בתוך השטחים. מכיוון שברור להם, שלא ניתן יהיה להשיג השלמה פלסטינית עם האפרטהייד, הכרוך בהגבלות תנועה וגזירות יומיומיות מבחינת האוכלוסייה, הם נוטים יותר ויותר לבדוק את האפשרות של טרנספר – ולו מקומי וחלקי – של אוכלוסייה פלסטינית בחסות של שפיכות דמים, שרשרת פיגועים ופעולות תגמול צבאיות. העימות החמוש נתפס על ידי גורמים פוליטיים ובטחוניים שונים, ובראשם שרון, כמסגרת נוחה, היוצרת הזדמנויות לשינוי משמעותי במציאות הטריטוריאלית והדמוגרפית.

שתי הגישות המנוגדות משלימות זו את זו. חלקים שונים במימסד הישראלי יכולים לעבור מתמיכה באחת לשנייה לפי הנסיבות המשתנות. אלה שמבקשים לבלוע שטחים, מגלים לעתים את מגבלות ההתפשטות ומבקשים לטהר אותם; אלה שחרדים כרגיל מעל לכל לטהרתה של המדינה היהודית ומהשתלבותה במזרח הערבי ותומכים לכן בהפרדה, מתפתים שוב ושוב להרפתקות התפשטות. איננו מתיימרים לדעת להיכן נוטה שרון. כיוון שיחסי הכוחות לטובתו, הוא נוטה להתקדם, כשהוא משאיר לעצמו את מירב האופציות פתוחות. בנטיותיו קרוב שרון יותר לאגף הטריטוריאלי, אבל הוא גמיש דיו כדי לאמץ, בנסיבות מסוימות, את רעיון הנסיגה החד-צדדית, המציעה יתרונות דמוגרפיים (כלומר, מעשי נישול וגירוש מוגבלים ב”במרחב התפר”). האסטרטגיה שלו היא של החרפה הדרגתית של העימות, הנחתת מכות קשות לתנועה הלאומית הפלסטינית, תוך יצירת תנאים נוחים בדעת הקהל הישראלית והבינלאומית, בהמתנה להזדמנויות מתאימות.

הצד השני של מדיניות שרון הוא ליכוד דעת הקהל הישראלית מאחוריו וביצור הקולקטיב הלאומי כדי שיעמוד מאוחד נוכח איום השלום הצודק. בעבור הוכח, כי חלקים ניכרים של החברה הישראלית יכולים להיחלץ מן החלומות המשיחיים של ההתנחלות המתמדת – כאשר עתיד אחר, של שלום, נראה ממשי ובר-השגה. לפיכך נוקט שרון מול דעת הקהל הישראלית אסטרטגיה מקורית. הוא אינו מבטיח לאזרחי ישראל את ימות המשיח. הוא אינו מבטיח ניצחון צבאי בנוסח הימין המשיחי ולא “מזרח תיכון חדש” בנוסח פרס. שרון מקפיד לא לפרוש חזון פוליטי – בין היתר, משום שאינו מאמין, שיוכל ללכד את החברה הישראלית סביב הסכמה פעילה לחזונו. במקום זאת, הוא מבקש לגרור את הציבור הישראלי להשלמה עם מדיניותו מחוסר ברירה, מתוך ייאוש ופחד. הוא אינו מבקש מן הישראלים שיסכימו למדיניותו הסכמה פעילה, אלא שיסכינו לה, שישלימו אתה מחוסר ברירה. הוא מוביל את העימות מהסלמה להסלמה, כדי למוטט כל סיכוי להסדר מדיני ולהפוך את הדיון על עתיד העמים לבלתי רלבנטי. ברק הכין לכך את הקרקע, בכך שהודיע שאין סיכוי להסדר פוליטי עם הפלסטינים. שרון ממשיך ומחריף את מדיניותו, בכך שהוא לא רק מודיע לישראלים שאין עתיד – אלא מחסל אותו במו ידיו, בטנקים ובולדוזרים. הוא נבנה מתחושת הייאוש והעדר המוצא, המשתרשת בישראל לאחר כל גל של פיגועי התאבדות. באמצעות החרפת הלחץ על האוכלוסייה הפלסטינית, פעולות חיסול, הרס בתים ופרובוקציות הוא טורח להזין את מעגל האלימות המשרת אותו. הברבריזציה של החברה הישראלית מבוססת בחלקה על ייאוש. כאשר אין תקווה ואין מוצא, נשארים רק ה”בטחון האישי” וההגיון הרצחני של הנקמה. זהו הקשר בין שני המרכיבים של תוכנית שרון: להכות את התנועה הלאומית הפלסטינית – ואת העם הפלסטיני בכללותו – מכה אנושה, כדי לעמוד על החורבות העשנות של מחנה הפליטים בג’נין ולהכריז בפני הישראלים: אין עם מי לדבר. זוהי נבואה המגשימה את עצמה.

יחסי-הכוחות הקיימים נוטים לטובת שרון ובן-אליעזר. יש צורך לפיכך באסטרטגיה של התנגדות לכיבוש, שאינה מצטמצמת בתגובה מיידית לעוולותיו ולפשעיו, אלא מנסה לשבש את ההגיון העומד בבסיסו ואת מימוש מטרותיו ארוכות-הטווח. צד אחד שלה חייב להיות ללא ספק חיזוק הצומוּד הפלסטיני. זהו למשל ההקשר שבו השתלבה תנועת תעאיוש במערכה ציבורית להגנת תושבי דרום הר-חברון מפני הנסיונות החוזרים ונשנים לגרש אותם מאדמותיהם. אך בנוסף למחאה הפעילה, יש צורך בחתירה תחת ההגיון הבסיסי של מדיניות המימסד. אם זו מבוססת על הפרדה וסגר, צריך לחתור תחתיהם. יש להציע לחברה הישראלית מוצא ממעגל הדמים, לא רק מחאה נגד הכיבוש – אלא אלטרנטיבה אפקטיבית, חיים מחוץ לגטו החמוש הנבנה סביבה: תעאיוש בין שווים.

2.

“חומת מגן” – השם שניתן למבצע הצבאי האחרון של שרון ומופז – אינו מקרי. השם מצביע על ניסיון לנצל את תחושות הפחד של הציבור הישראלי כדי להכות בעם הפלסטיני; הרס ומוות נועדו להבטיח ביטחון אשלייתי. אך מעבר לכך, השם שניתן למבצע הצבאי הוא המשך למסורת ארוכה. החל בחומה המגינה על אירופה מפני אסיה, שהמתיישבים היהודים היו אמורים להוות חלק ממנה לפי חזונו של הרצל; דרך ה’חומה ומגדל’ של תנועת העבודה ו’קיר הברזל’ של ז’בוטינסקי, וכלה בדברי בן-גוריון, אשר תיאר את שיכונם של עולים חדשים באזורי הספר כהקמת ‘חומה אדם’, חומה שהלחץ החיצוני מגבש ומלכד אותה.[1] מכאן אפשר היה להמשיך מן ה’משלטים’ ל’מעוזים’, מ’גדר המערכת’ ל’רצועת הביטחון’, מן ה’סגר’ ל’כתר’, ובתוך כל אלה — את עיצובה של החברה הישראלית כ’מדינה במצור’.

עלינו להקפיד על “גידור החברה היהודית”, כתב אהרון אהרונסון לפני יותר משמונים שנה. ואילו אבשלום פיינברג תיאר בעקבות מלחמת העולם הראשונה את ה”חשיבות הכלכלית והציביליזטורית” של “חוטי התיל הדוקרניים” בפלשתינה, אשר יקיפו את המושבות הציוניות, ישסעו את הנוף ויגבילו את חופש התנועה של יושבי המקום. וכך כתב:

“במשך עשרים-וחמש שנה היו הכל עדים למראה, איך לאורך עשרות ומאות קילומטרים מוקמות גדרות של חוטי-ברזל דוקרניים לאורך עצי האקציה שניטעו כאן. האקציה טיפסה, התפתלה בתוך התיל, ירוקה בכל עת, פורחת, מפיצה ריח וכן גם עמוסת קוצים, אלגנטית ומחמירה ומגינה על הנטיעות שהפקידוה על שמירתן. אפילו התן החל להיתקל במכשולים, ובעיני בן-בריתו ההולך-על-שתיים, הערבי, הלכו המכשולים האלה והחמירו יותר ויותר. ואם נתאר את התמונה בסגנון הברית החדשה, יהיה עלינו לומר: מצד אחד, בתוך השטח המוקף גדר, בעל-הבית האמיץ העומד ללא לאות על המשמר, ומצד השני, בחוץ, הגנב האורב לגזל (שני גזעים, שתי תורות-מוסר) — ושני אלה הצליחו לחיות בשלום.”

גדר חיה, חוטי תיל המשתלבים בצמחים ומקיפים את “בעל הבית האמיץ” מול אויבו “הערבי”, כאשר שני אלה מצליחים “לחיות בשלום” משני עברי הגדר – זהו אחד הניסוחים הקולעים ביותר לחלום הציוני, לפנטסיה קולוניאלית הנהפכת לסיוט: גדר תיל מפרידה וכולאת, מלכודת ליושבים בתוכה – ואסון לנמצאים מחוצה לה.

מכאן ועד היום מעצבת ההפרדה את החברה הקולוניאלית שהתהוותה בארץ. היא נועדה להבטיח, שהמתישבים יהפכו מרצונם לחלק מ”חומת-אדם”. הלחץ החיצוני ילכד אותם ויכריח אותם להסתמך על חסות חיצונית אימפריאלית. לעומת זאת, כל סיכוי להשתלבותם במרחב, כל פירצה בגדר המקיפה אותם, מאיימים על עצם המשכו של המפעל הקולוניאלי.[2] כדי לחיות בשלום, על המתיישבים להתחיל לנהוג ולתפוס את עצמם כיושבי המקום, להשתחרר מן השריון המקיף אותם, שנדמה להם שנועד להגן עליהם – אך בפועל ממיט עליהם חורבן. מכאן עולות כמה מסקנות הן ביחס להתנגדות הפלסטינית לכיבוש בשטחים, והן ביחס לפעילותנו בתחומי מדינת ישראל.

מהלכים דיפלומטיים ופיגועים באוכלוסייה אזרחית אינם מהווים אסטרטגיה יעילה נגד הכיבוש. ההנהגה הישראלית מצליחה לרתום אותם לשירות הנצחת המהלך הקולוניאלי. ניתן להציב התנגדות יעילה לכיבוש, אם לוקחים בחשבון את ההגיון העמוק של המהלך הקולוניזטורי. מול שרון יש להציב אלטרנטיבה, שיש בה התנגדות חסרת פשרות להמשך הנישול, התנגדות אזרחית, עממית והמונית, המונעת את הדמוניזציה של העם הפלסטיני – יחד עם נכונות להשלים (לא לצרכי דיפלומטיה ולא כטקטיקה) עם המציאות שכבר נוצרה, עם קיומו של עם ישראלי כחלק בר-קיימא של הארץ ושל האזור. רק העם הפלסטיני והעמים הערביים יכולים להציע ליהודים בישראל מה ששום מעצמה זרה אינה יכולה לתת להם: לגיטימציה של ממש וערבויות לבטחונם הקיומי. יותר מכך: הם יכולים לסייע לישראלים להיחלץ מחומת הברזל המקיפה אותם, בכך שיציעו להם תעאיוש אמיתי, בין שווים, לאחר הפלת גדרות התיל, בהן כיתרו את העם הפלסטיני.

כיצד אפשר להעביר מסר כזה? כיצד לשכנע בו את הישראלים? במלים בלבד אי-אפשר לעשות זאת. חשוב עוד יותר היה, שפעולות ההתנגדות לכיבוש יביעו את המסר הזה לישראלים, יסמנו עבורם אלטרנטיבה של תקווה. קשה מאוד לבקש זאת מעם החי תחת כיבוש, מאנשים הסובלים מלחץ יומיומי וחשופים למעשי הטרור הממלכתי שמבצעת ישראל. אבל, יש לעם הפלסטיני אינטרס עליון להכשיל את ההיגיון הקולוניזטורי הבסיסי – העימות המוביל לנישול, המלווה בהתיישבות וגורר עימות נוסף. לא קל, אבל ניתן למצוא דרכים לחתור תחת החומות המנטליות כדי להרחיב ככל האפשר את הפער בין החברה הישראלית לבין הנהגתה המדינית-בטחונית.

התנגדות אפקטיבית לכיבוש, אם כן, אינה יכולה להסתפק בזירות בהם מתנהל הכיבוש עצמו. בעצם, היא לא יכולה להיות רק “התנגדות”. יש צורך דווקא באסטרטגיה “התקפית”, כזאת שמנסה לקבוע בעצמה את זירת המאבק, חותרת תחת ההיגיון הקולוניאלי ומציבה אלטרנטיבה שיש בה גם תקווה לחיים אחרים. לכן היא חייבת לכלול גם את התהליכים הפנימיים בישראל.

החברה הישראלית מבוססת על הפרדה קפדנית לא פחות בין יהודים לערבים. היא התנאי המוקדם לאפקטיביות של האפליה כלפי המיעוט הלאומי הפלסטיני, והיא מרכיב מרכזי בבניית השריון שנועד להקיף את הקולקטיב היהודי. כל המבנה החברתי בישראל מנציח את ההפרדה והאפליה. ערים מעורבות אינן מעורבות; הן מבוססות על גטאות. שוק העבודה מפוצל; מערכת החינוך מופרדת. האפשרות של חיי תעאיוש בחברה הישראלית היא הסיוט של הממסד הישראלי על כל אגפיו. על כן, כל מערכת האינדוקטרינציה (בתי-הספר, כלי התקשורת, מוסדות התרבות ומומחים למיניהם) נרתמת לחיזוק וביצור של המימד הבדלני בזהות היהודית. משרד הפנים מערים קשיים עצומים על התאזרחותם של לא-יהודים, ערבים או אחרים. משרד הקליטה צמא לבואם של עולים יהודים. למרות האבטלה והשאיפה לקצץ בהוצאות הממשלה הוא שולח שליחים, מעודד יהודים לבוא ומבטיח הרים וגבעות. יחד עם הסוכנות היהודית הם מנסים לכוון את העולים לפי האינטרסים ההתיישבותיים הלאומיים: לייהד את הגליל, לחזק את אריאל, מעלה-אדומים או קריית-ארבע. העולים יקבלו הטבות מפליגות, אם יבחרו ללכת למקומות יישוב, שבהם הפריבילגיות היחסיות שיוענקו להם יציבו אותם מול שכניהם הערבים. הם יהפכו, במלותיו של בן-גוריון, ל”חומת אדם”.

בדרך זו ילמדו אותם ישראלים-יהודים חדשים מיד את נוסחת הפלא של הקיום במסגרת המפעל הציוני: מה שטוב ליהודים רע לערבים ובהכרח גם ההפך. כדי שלא יתפתח תעאיוש, חס וחלילה, כלי התקשורת ההמוניים מזהירים את היהודים חדשות לבקרים, באין-ספור צורות ישירות ועקיפות מכניסה ליישובים ערבים ומקשרים חברתיים. בגיאוגרפיה המדומיינת של רוב האזרחים היהודים בישראל, היישובים הערביים נותרים מטושטשים. טייבה משויכת ל”משולש”, מחוז רחוק ובלתי נתפס אצל התל אביבי או הרמת גני המצוי, שלא יודע שטייבה היא גם ב”שרון”, כמו שכפר-סבא ממוקמת לא רק סמוך (מול!) לקלקיליה, אלא גם במשולש הדרומי. ההפרדה הממשית ולא פחות ממנה ההפרדה המנטלית, הם מנגנונים המשרתים את המשך יחסי השליטה ומאפשרים לחדש את תהליכי הקולוניזציה בתוך הקו הירוק ומעבר לו. הגדרות והחומות המקיפות מתחמות היטב את הקולקטיב הלאומי-אתני, מלכדות את יושבי המצודות, מנכרות אותם מיושבי המקום, הנהפכים ל”סביבה עוינת”, ומשרטטות את קווי העימות בין יהודים לערבים. ללא החומות והגדרות המפרידות, ה”אנחנו” וה”הם” היו עלולים להתבלבל והיה קשה מאוד ללבות אינספור פעמים את העימות ההיסטורי, שהוא תוצר של מהלך הכיבוש-ההתיישבות-והגירוש הקודם – והוא גם התירוץ למהלך הבא.

גם במסגרת של יחסי שליטה ואי-שוויון, הכלכלה הקפיטליסטית המפותחת והחברה המודרנית יוצרות, למרות הכל, הרבה נקודות מגע אנושיות, שיכולות לערער על היגיון ההפרדה. כך למשל באוניברסיטאות, בהן מוצאים עצמם יהודים וערבים זה בצד זה. זה היה הבסיס החברתי לפעולתן של קבוצות שמאל משותפות, כגון קמפו”ס, שמילאו תפקיד חשוב הן במאבק נגד גזענות ואפליה, והן בתנועת המחאה נגד המלחמה בלבנון. אך גם במקומות עבודה או בבתי-חולים יכולים להיווצר סיטואציות חברתיות, המעמידות בסכנה את עקרון ההפרדה. לפעמים, המגע האנושי או ההזדהות על רקע בסיס משותף אחר (מקצוע, אהדה ספורטיבית, אינטרס עסקי, ועוד) מעמידים בסימן שאלה את הדיכוטומיה הלאומית המקובלת. בדרך כלל, אלו רק ספקות קלושים ובלתי-מנוסחים אל מול אידיאולוגיית ההפרדה השלטת ברמה. על רקע זה יש להבין את הופעת מושג ה”דו-קיום” (coexistence), תפיסה של יחסי-גומלין ומגעים לא-קונפליקטואליים בין יהודים לערבים, שמנסה לווסת את המגעים האלה מבלי לערער על ההפרדה היסודית. ממש כשם שמעצמות-העל ביססו ביניהן דו-קיום חמוש בתקופת המלחמה הקרה מבלי לבטל את היריבות ובלי לגעת ביסודות הקונפליקט ביניהן, כך מבקש הדו-קיום לנהל חיי יומיום, שבהם ערבים ויהודים אינם נגררים לעימותים בלתי-פוסקים ואף משתפים פעולה ביניהם. כל זאת – בלי לגעת בגורמי הקונפליקט ובלי לערער על הגדרת המחנות היריבים. אסור לזלזל בתירבות הקונפליקט, במיוחד אם ניקח ברצינות את סכנת הברבריזציה האלימה שלו. אבל דו-קיום אינו יכול להיות תעאיוש. תעאיוש פירושו חיים משותפים, על בסיס של שוויון, המערער על חומות ההפרדה והשבטיות.

זהו, לדעתנו, ההגיון הפוליטי הבסיסי, המנחה את פעולות תעאיוש. לפני שנסקור כיצד הגיון זה מתבטא בפעילות הקבוצה, עלינו להדגיש, שאנו מבטאים את פרשנותנו הפרטית בלבד. מצד שני, מדובר בתוצר של פעילות קולקטיבית. הניתוח מבוסס אומנם על ניסיונות פוליטיים קודמים בהם היינו מעורבים, אך איננו פרי מחשבתנו בלבד. הוא הלך והתגבש מתוך פעולות תעאיוש, בשיחות ארוכות עם פעילותיה ופעיליה. שנית, יש פער ברור בין החזון המקיף של תעאיוש לבין התנועה הקטנה, הנושאת את השם הזה. היא אומנם התחזקה בשנה וחצי האחרונות והשיגה כמה הישגים משמעותיים, אך ודאי אינה מימוש מלא של הדברים שפרשנו כאן. אך הפרקטיקה הפוליטית והחזון החלופי חשובים הרבה יותר מן הארגון הספציפי המבקש לקדם אותם.

3.

במהלך המחצית השניה של אוקטובר 2000 מצאנו את עצמנו יחד עם פעילי שמאל, שדרכינו הצטלבו בהזדמנויות שונות בעבר, נפגשים בהפגנות היהודיות-ערביות המעטות שנערכו בערים הגדולות. 13 פלסטינים אזרחי ישראל נהרגו מדי כוחות הבטחון; האינתיפאדה השנייה פרצה. היינו נבוכים וכועסים. כעסנו על השמאל הציוני ה”מבולבל”, שנטש את מחנה השלום ואת שותפיו הערביים. היינו נבוכים בשל חוסר האונים של הכוחות העקביים בשמאל הישראלי ושל התנועות הפוליטיות בציבור הערבי. חשנו תחושה קשה ביחס לעצמנו, משום שבשעות קשות של מבחן, בשעות של פורענות, לא היינו מסוגלים לייצר שום תגובת-נגד משמעותית חוץ מטלפונים מודאגים לחברים. בשעת מבחן עליונה לא היה מי שיגייס את פעילי השמאל היהודים לעזרת חבריהם הערבים. בשעה זו הוכח כוחו של משטר ההפרדה בחברה הישראלית לשתק את הפעילות הפוליטית. מי שכמונו השתתף בעבר פעילות שמאלית יהודית-ערבית, חש כאב צורב נוכח חוסר המעש. הזיכרון ההיסטורי של הפיצולים הקודמים בין יהודים לערבים במסגרות השמאל בארץ בשעת משבר פוליטי לא בישר טובות. בסוף אוקטובר 2000 העניקה דעת הקהל היהודית בישראל הכשר הולך ומתרחב לפגיעה בזכויות המיעוט הפלסטיני ורעיון הטרנספר צבר מאז חסידים ולגיטימציה. מצד שני, בציבור הערבי התחזקו מגמות בדלניות מובהקות. התפשטה התחושה, שאין מה לצפות משותפים יהודים ויחד עמה גם גברה הטינה חסרת ההבחנה כלפי היהודים. לאחר פרצי המחאה ההמונית הסוערת והדיכוי האלים, החל בסוף אוקטובר שלב של הסתגרות, פחד ופסיביות.

בינתיים החריף העימות בשטחים הכבושים. ברק השלים את הישגו העיקרי – לשכנע את דעת הקהל היהודית, שאין עם מי לעשות שלום בעת הזאת. הכתר והסגר הפכו לאמצעים העיקריים להכנעת העם הפלסטיני, בעוד שפיכות הדמים היומיומית נמשכת, “מחנה השלום” הציוני התנדף. על כן גברה חשיבות תנועות השלום העקביות. אך לא יכולנו להסתפק בפעילויות במסגרת תנועות מחאה של שמאלנים יהודים, רדיקליות וצודקות ככל שיהיו. החברים הערבים הראשונים בקבוצה חשו מצדם בסכנות הכרוכות בבידוד הפוליטי לאחר אירועי אוקטובר 2000, ובה בעת היו מעונינים לחרוג בפעילותם אל מעבר למישור המקומי ומעבר למסגרות המפלגתיות. כמונו, גם הם היו צמאים לשותפות פוליטית ערבית-יהודית. יחד חשבנו על הקמת קבוצת פעולה ערבית-יהודית שתפעל נגד הכיבוש, אבל שתהיה גם מסוגלת להגיב בשעת פורענות כלפי הפלסטינים בתוך ישראל ושתחתור כנגד ההפרדה והבדלנות הלאומית-שבטית. המחויבות העמוקה, הרגשית והמוסרית, למאבק יהודי-ערבי משותף בשתי הזירות, קדמה לכל בירור בשאלה, איזו מין קבוצה אנו רוצים להקים וכיצד ניתן לפעול בתנאים החדשים שנוצרו. מעל הכל רצינו להיות ביחד, יהודים וערבים, בשעת סכנה, בימים הקשים שצפינו שעוד יבואו. זאת המחויבות שלנו מעבר לכל שיקול של תועלת פוליטית. כדי לעמוד במחויבות הזאת, נדרשנו לבנות שותפות עמוקה המבוססת על אמון מלא. לכן, בשיחות ובפעולות ראשונות התחלנו לחתור להיכרות מעמיקה, אישית, כזאת שחורגת מדיונים פוליטיים, אך גם אינה חומקת מהם. רק ברית מלמטה של פעילים, ההולכת ונרקמת תוך פעולות משותפות, תוך התמודדות ביחד עם קשיים וסכנות, עשויה להצמיח אמון עמוק. לא היו בידנו מתכונים תיאורטיים או מעשיים. היה לנו כיוון כללי, כוונות ותחושת מחויבות.

עם זאת, רוב הפעילים בגרעין ההתחלתי של תעאיוש היו בעלי ניסיון פוליטי קודם, גם במסגרות יהודיות-ערביות. הכרנו גם כמה מהרגישויות, שכדאי לקחת בחשבון תוך כדי העבודה המשותפת. חתרנו לעבוד ביחד ללא התנשאות, ללא אידאליזציה, בלי פשרות כלפי המדיניות הרשמית ובלי להינתק מן הסביבות החברתיות המגוונות שמהם אנו באים. כדי שפעילות ערבית-יהודית לא תישאר בגדר הצהרה פורמלית, הכרחי שכל ההחלטות יתקבלו ביחד, שהפעילים הערבים והיהודים ישקלו ביחד את הרגישויות והמשמעויות של כל פעולה במהלך תכנונה. התנסויות פוליטיות קודמות שכנעו אותנו, שיש לתת עדיפות לפעולות על פני ניסוחו של מצע מדוקדק. ידענו הרי מראש, שכולנו מתנגדים לכיבוש ותומכים בשוויון מלא בין ערבים ליהודים בתוך ישראל. בקלות יכולנו לבלות שבועות ארוכים בפולמוסים על פרטי תוכנית השלום הצודק\האפשרי\הרצוי. במקום אמון היינו זורעים אז פלגנות ווכחנות. המציאות הבוערת תבעה מאיתנו להתקדם בתחום הפעילות המעשית. רצינו גם לבנות קבוצה רחבה מבחינת זהויותיהם הפוליטיות של הפעילים, קבוצה שפתוחה לשיתוף פעולה עם מפלגות וארגונים על בסיס של הסכמה על פעילות משותפת, אך שומרת על עצמאותה. מדיניות זו הוכיחה את עצמה, וכיום יש בינינו רבים שאינם חברים או פעילים באף מפלגה או ארגון ובצדם גם פעילים ופעילות, שהם בו בזמן פעילים בחד”ש, בבל”ד, במר”צ, בארגוני שלום, בארגונים פמיניסטיים, בקשת הדמוקרטית המזרחית ובארגונים חברתיים שונים.

מכיוון שלא היינו קואליציה של נציגי ארגונים וגם לא ארגון היררכי עם חלוקת תפקידים מוגדרת מראש, אימצנו מהר מאוד דפוסי התארגנות של דמוקרטיה השתתפותית, שבה ההחלטות מתקבלות בפורום פעילים רחב, על בסיס ליבון עמוק של אופי הפעילות. מטרת הדיונים הממושכים בקבוצה אינה חידוד הבדלי העמדות השונות כדי לגבור בעזרת הרוב על המיעוט, אלא להבין לעומק את ההגיון העומד ביסוד העמדות השונות, ולשכנע זה את זה במידת האפשר כדי להגיע להסכמה, שיכולה לשמש בסיס לפעולה משותפת. ניסינו לקבל החלטות בהסכמה ונוצרה אווירת שיחה שאפשרה לקיים דיונים ממצים, תוך הקדשת תשומת לב רבה לפרטי הפעולות ולמשמעויותיהן בנסיון להיבנות מריבוי הפרספקטיבות בתוך הקבוצה. מתחילתה היתה תעאיוש קבוצה הטרוגנית מבחינת גילאים, נסיון חיים ומוצא מעמדי, אתני ותרבותי.

עיקר המחשבה מוקדש בתעאיוש לפעולות עצמן. הנטיה של רובנו היתה לפעולות סולידריות ישירות, פעולות בעלות משמעות מעשית ולא רק סמלית. ניסינו לחשוב ביחד, כיצד ניתן בתנאים הקשים שנוצרו לא רק להצהיר על מסר פוליטי – אלא להעביר אותו. איך לעצב פעולות, שמערבות את מירב האנשים בפעילות ומעודדות אותם לקחת אחריות? כאשר התחלנו לפעול בנובמבר 2000, מטרתנו לא היתה ליצור קבוצה מצומצמת של פעילים מסורים, אלא לאפשר גם לדור חדש של פעילים להצטרף. חיפשנו דגמי פעולה, המאפשרים לחרוג מן המעגל המצומצם של פעילים פוליטיים. נראה לנו, שאמון ומחויבות עמוקים קשורים לדברים מוחשיים, שמאבק בכיבוש או באפליה קשור לעניינים קונקרטיים, “קטנים” בראייה הכוללת, אך גדולים ומשמעותיים מאוד עבור בני אדם הנתונים בדיכוי. גם השמאל העקבי, בארץ ובהרבה מקומות בעולם, איבד לעתים קרובות את המגע והקשר בין המישורים העקרוניים של מאבקיו לבין המימד המעשי הקונקרטי של הדיכוי והשחרור. ההיגררות של השמאל הרדיקלי והחברתי לפוליטיקת הסמלים והסיסמאות יכולה לגרום לאובדן היסוד המגייס והמעצים שבמאבקים הקונקרטיים. כאשר הזהות הפוליטית מסתכמת בנקיטת עמדות אל מול דבריהם של הפוליטיקאים המיוצגים במרקע הטלוויזיה, הופכים כולנו לאסירי המדיה, המתווכת לנו מציאות ועמדות.

לשיקול העקרוני הזה יש משמעות מיוחדת בהקשר הספציפי בו אנו פועלים. במלים ובסמלים קשה מאוד להתגבר על הפחד והגזענות, שהמציאות הפוליטית הכוללת עצמה תורמת לשעתוקם. ספק גדול אם טקסטים מנוסחים היטב מסוגלים כיום לשכנע פלסטינים, כי יש להם שותפי-אמת בישראל במאבק נגד הכיבוש, או לשכנע ישראלים, כי יש חלופה ממשית להסתגרות מאחורי גדר ההפרדה. “חשיפה תקשורתית” אינה יכולה כשלעצמה לערער על הדרך בה נתפסת מציאות פוליטית, הנקבעת על-ידי בולדוזרים, מחסומים, ומוות יומיומי. לכן, איננו מציבים לעצמנו כמטרה מרכזית להופיע בטלוויזיה ואנו נמנעים מהוצאת הצהרות לעיתונות או מקיום אירועים בעלי ערך סמלי רק כדי “להיכנס לתקשורת”. כניסה של 200 אזרחים ישראלים, יהודים וערבים, לכפר בגדה הסובל מסגר והתנכלויות נראית לנו פעולה מועילה וראויה יותר ממשמרת מחאה עם קוריוז מעניין למען צלמי העיתונות. איננו מזלזלים כמובן בכוחה של התקשורת ובחשיבותן של פעולות סמליות, המכוונות להגיע באמצעותה אל האנשים. אך האפקטיביות של פעולות כאלה – בהם השתתפה קבוצת תעאיוש בצד תנועות השמאל האחרות – מותנית בתנאים חברתיים מוקדמים, בראש ובראשונה ­– בקיומה של אוירה, המאפשרת לחלקים ניכרים בציבורים אליהם הן מופנות להזדהות עם המסר שהן מבקשות להעביר. לא זו האוירה שבה אנו פועלים בדרך כלל. מעגל הדמים שבו אנו נמצאים מעמיק את התהום שבין נקודות-הראות של פלסטינים וישראלים. הוא מציב את תחושותיהם וכאביהם בניגוד חריף זה לזה. לכן המעטנו בפעילויות סמליות. ההחלטה להתמקד בסוגי פעולה אחרים היתה גם קלה יותר, משום שמראש החלטנו לא להתחרות בגופים הפוליטיים הקיימים אלא להוסיף לפעולתם מימדים שנראו לנו חסרים. רבים מפעילי תעאיוש משתתפים לכן בפעילויות נגד הכיבוש ולמען שוויון שיוזמות קבוצות אחרות.

תוך כדי דיונים התעצבו דפוסי הפעולה המאפיינים כיום את תנועת תעאיוש. הם לא היו קיימים מראש כמתכונים מוכנים, אלא נולדו תוך שיחות ופעולות, במבחן של ההתנסות הרפלקטיבית ובעזרתם של פעילים פלסטיניים בשטחים הכבושים. בשטחים מצאנו שותפים להעדפה שלנו לפוליטיקה “מלמטה”, פוליטיקה עממית, בלתי-אלימה, ישירה וקונקרטית. בכפרים שבאזור סלפית יצרנו קשר עם פעילים פוליטיים פלסטיניים, שעזרו לנו לעצב את אופני הפעולה של הקבוצה והיו מוכנים להיכנס לתהליך המורכב של בניית אמון ושותפות. אלה אינם דברים מובנים מאליהם בימים של שפיכות דמים יומיומית ושל דיכוטומיות לאומיות-שבטיות. למרות הלחץ המתמיד של הכיבוש, מגזרים רבים בחברה הפלסטינית לא איבדו את יכולת ההבחנה כלפי החברה הישראלית. ללא קונצנזוס מקומי רחב לא ניתן לערוך ביקורים המוניים של אזרחי ישראל בכפרי הגדה. לולי האמון העמוק שרוחשים לפעילים כאלה בישובי הגדה המערבית, לא היינו יכולים לפעול. יחד איתם התחלנו לארגן את שיירות המזון והסולידריות. השיירות התפתחו מתוך דגם נפוץ ומוכר של הבעת סולידריות – משלוחי המזון מן הפלסטינים בישראל לאחיהם הסובלים מסגר ומצור כלכלי בשטחים הכבושים.

השיירה הראשונה שלנו יצאה בתחילת דצמבר 2000 לעבר הכפר חארס באזור סלפית. זו הייתה שיירה משותפת של קבוצת תעאיוש וסניף חד”ש בכפר קאסם. החידוש היה קודם כל בהרכב היהודי-ערבי, לא רק של מי שנסעו יחד עם משאית המזון לחארס, אלא גם של התורמים לאיסוף המזון. השיירות של תעאיוש כרוכות בגיוס תרומות גם בדרך של פנייה ישירה לאוכלוסייה יהודית-ישראלית. בדוכני איסוף שלנו במקומות ציבוריים בערים הגדולות מבקשים הפעילים תרומות מעוברים ושבים בכרוזים, בכרזות ובשיחות בעל-פה. זהו אתגר בפני כל עובר אורח: האם אתה מוכן להזדהות עם סבלם של הפלסטינים בשטחים הכבושים? גם כאשר האווירה הציבורית לא מאפשרת לנו לקיים בדוכנים ברחוב (ארבעה דוכני איסוף פוזרו באלימות על-ידי בריונים), במיוחד בתקופות של פיגועים קשים נגד אזרחים, הפניה של עשרות פעילים לבני המשפחה, לחברים לעבודה ולמכרים לתרום ולהזדהות היא צעד פוליטי חשוב, המעמת אנשים עם תוצאות מדיניות הממשלה. אנשים רבים שאינם רוצים או מסוגלים מסיבות שונות להשתתף בפעילות פוליטית שוטפת מצאו בתרומה לשיירות המזון דרך להביע את עמדתם, דרך לקשור עצמם למאבק ולהרגיש שהם אינם מבודדים בחברה הישראלית. הפעילים הערבים שיצאו לדוכנים בערים הגדולות בצד חבריהם היהודים הרגישו, שלמרות העוינות והגזענות המאפיינים את הרחוב היהודי הם מסוגלים להעז ולהביע עמדה פוליטית ברורה. במקרים מסוימים לדבריהם של החברים הערבים היה משקל רב יותר בדיונים עם עוברים ושבים לא משוכנעים. מצד שני, האיסופים המשותפים של פעילים יהודים וערבים ביישובים הערביים בתוך ישראל שברו את תמונת העולם הדיכוטומית הנפוצה והגבירו את תחושת המחויבות של חלק מהאוכלוסייה.

היציאה בשיירת מכוניות ארוכה, כאשר הפעילים הערבים והיהודים מתערבבים זה בזה ומתחייבים להגן אלה על אלה, היא עצמה הפגנה פוליטית ממדרגה ראשונה. מדובר בהפגנה לא מתסכלת, המחזקת את המשתתפים בה ומפגישה אותם עם המציאות הקונקרטית של הכיבוש. המשתתפים בשיירות נתקלים במחסומים, בערמות העפר החוסמות את הכניסה ליישוב ורואים את עצי הזית שנכרתו בידי מתנחלים בחסות הרשויות. הם פוגשים את האנשים המובטלים מאונס זה חודשים ארוכים ואת ילדי המקום, שהמונח “יהוד” הוא כרגיל עבורם שם נרדף לחייל או מתנחל. הפרספקטיבה של המשתתפים בשיירה גם היא משתנה בצורה מרתקת. בדרך כלל הצבא והמשטרה עוקבים מקרוב אחרי שיירות תעאיוש, וכאשר אינם מנסים לחסום את דרכנו, הם מנסים ללוות אותנו ליעדנו ונדחים בתקיפות בכניסה ליישוב המיועד. הצבא מציע להגן עלינו, האזרחים הישראלים הנוסעים בתוככי השטחים הכבושים, ואנו מסרבים. עד עתה הצלחנו לאחר מו”מ ולחץ מצידנו להיכנס לרוב הישובים הפלסטינים ללא ליווי צבאי. עבור ישראלים שחווים ביקור כזה לראשונה, רגע ההינתקות מן הג’יפים שעקבו אחרינו, המפגש עם המארחים שלנו והכניסה לכפר מאפשרים להם לחוש לרגע מוקפים על-ידי צבא כיבוש כמו האוכלוסייה הפלסטינית.

העובדה שהפעילים מביאים איתם עזרה קונקרטית לקהילות הפלסטיניות בשטחים – לא כמעשה נדבה או אקט הומניטרי גרידא, אלא כביטוי לסולידריות פוליטית של קבוצה יהודית-ערבית הפועלת בתוך ישראל – משפיעה על אופי הפעולה. השיירה אינה נושאת מסר סמלי בלבד. עובדה  זו מעניקה לפעילים נחישות וכוח, ובה בעת מחזקת את אופייה הבלתי-אלים של הפעולה. מצד שני, היא מקשה על כוחות הצבא והמתנחלים לעצור אותם. כאשר ניסה כוח משמר הגבול למנוע מאיתנו באפריל 2001 לפרוק משאית מזון בכפר יאסוף, רק המחישו בכך לעיני המצלמות את אחד מאמצעי הדיכוי הקשים, היעילים, הבלתי-נראים והבלתי-מצטלמים שהפעילו ברק ושרון – הכתר והלחץ הכלכלי. חיילי מג”ב דחפו והיכו פעילים, שפרקו שקי אורז וסוכר. הפעילים המשיכו בפריקה תוך כדי התנגדות לא-אלימה לקול תשואות תושבי הכפר.

אבל, התנאים הצבאיים והפוליטיים לא תמיד מאפשרים לקיים שיירות סולידריות המוניות כפי שהיינו רוצים. דווקא בעת החרפה של הדיכוי הצבאי וכניסה של צה”ל לשטחי איי, יש צורך מיוחד בעזרה הסולידרית שלנו. כך היו מספר מקרים בהם מצאנו דרכים להעביר מזון או תרופות כסיוע סולידרי מיידי ללא שיירות המוניות. במהלך הפלישה הגדולה הראשונה של צה”ל לרמאללה ארגנה תעאיוש יחד עם קואליציית הנשים לשלום ועם וועדת המעקב העליונה לערבים בישראל הפגנה גדולה מול מחסום א-ראם, בתביעה להעביר משאיות תרופות ומזון לרמאללה הכבושה. למרות נסיונות לפזר את המפגינים בגז מדמיע ואלות, נאלצו הרשויות לאפשר לסיוע לעבור כתנאי להסכמתנו להתפנות. חזרנו על מתכון זה, יחד עם שותפינו, במחסום מול ג’נין שבועיים לאחר מכן.

העמקת המימד החברתי של הפעולה הפוליטית מחייבת מעורבות ארוכה-טווח במאבקים מקומיים. דוגמא טובה למערכה מקומית מסוג זה אפשר למצוא בפעילות תעאיוש בדאר אלחנון, כפר קטן בלתי-מוכר במשולש הצפוני.[3] זה כעשרים שנה שרשויות מדינת ישראל משקיעות מאמץ רב בנסיון לסלק את תושבי הכפר ממקומם. יחד עם תושבי המקום, ארגנה תנועת תעאיוש מחנה עבודה התנדבותי באוגוסט 2001. היה זה פרויקט צנוע, ששאב את השראתו ממסורת מחנות העבודה ההתנדבותיים, שפרחו בשנות השבעים והשמונים.[4]

כ-400 מתנדבים יהודים וערבים מכל רחבי ישראל סללו במהלכו כביש גישה בן כמאה מטר לכיכר הכפר, סילקו את הריסות הבתים שנהרסו בשנים הקודמות והקימו מגרש משחקים לילדים. כל בנייה בכפר בלתי-מוכר אסורה, אך היתה זו יוזמה שקשה היה מאוד לשלטונות להתנגד לה. ואכן, כוח המשטרה שהגיע למקום בשעת העבודות נאלץ לסגת. צו ההריסה שהוציאו הרשויות בוטל בבית-משפט השלום; המדינה ערערה על כך והמערכה המשפטית והציבורית נמשכת. היא אינה מצטמצמת להגנה על הקיים בלבד: הוגשה תוכנית מתאר חלופית לכפר ומאז נמשך המאמץ ליצור ברית רחבה ביישובי הסביבה ולובי פרלמנטרי למען דאר אלחנון.

אין זו פעולה קיצונית; היא קונסטרוקטיבית, בלתי-אלימה – ורדיקלית במובן העמוק של המושג: היא חושפת את שורשי האפליה הסמויים מן העין – ומבקשת להעמיד אותם בסימן שאלה. במקום להסתפק בהתגוננות סבילה כנגד המלחמה השקטה שמנהלות רשויות המדינה נגד המיעוט הלאומי הפלסטיני, מציע מחנה העבודה אתגר קונקרטי למדיניות השלטונות ופותח מערכה פוליטית. אך חשוב לראות, שהפעולה הפוליטית אינה מכוונת רק כלפי השלטונות, אלא כלפי המשתתפים עצמם: ראשית, הקהילה המקומית התלכדה סביב הפרויקט הקונקרטי, שכן במרכז המאבק עומדים האינטרסים החיוניים שלה, ולא סיסמאות מופשטות בלבד. שנית, המשתתפים במחנה, ערבים כיהודים, התוודעו במהלכו לאפליה המבנית של אזרחי ישראל הפלסטינים. מי שעבד בדאר אלחנון ולמד מקרוב את תולדות הנסיונות לסלק את תושביו, לא יתקשה להבין, מה פירוש “כיבוש הקרקע”. משתתפי המחנה גם הפכו מחויבים להגן על מה שבנו יחד עם התושבים. שלישית, האתגר הקונקרטי גייס את הקהילות המקומיות השכנות לסולידריות פעילה עם תושבי דאר אלחנון. ברית הפעולה הרחבה למען דאר אלחנון איחדה את הכוחות הפוליטיים מלמטה, וחשוב עוד יותר – אפשרה לרבים לצאת מן הסבילות ולבחון אפשרויות פעולה חדשות.

חלק ניכר מפעילותה של תעאיוש בשטחים הכבושים התרכז בשני אזורים, שסכנת נישול וסיפוח נשקפת להם הן לפי תוכניות ברק והן לפי מפות שרון: אזור סלפית ואזור דרום הר חברון. בתוך מעגל הדמים שאני מצויים בו, בימים של פגיעות יומיומיות בזכויות האדם בשטחים הכבושים, יש צורך דחוף להסב את תשומת-הלב הציבורית למהלכים הטריטוריאליים והדמוגרפיים, היוצרים מציאות חדשה: התנחלות, נישול, עקירה וסיפוח. מכאן חשיבות המערכה להגנה על תושבי דרום חברון, אותם מנסים שלטונות ישראל זה כמה שנים לגרש מאדמותיהם. פעילי תעאיוש הצטרפו למערכה בדרום הר-חברון בקיץ 2001. גם כאן נוצרה עד מהרה ברית פעולה בין תעאיוש לפעילי גופים אחרים המתנגדים הכיבוש, שצברו נסיון רב במערכות הקודמות להגנת התושבים מאז 1999 – פעילי הוועד נגד הריסות בתים, רבנים לזכויות אדם, האגודה לזכויות האזרח, הפורום למען דו-קיום בנגב והמרכז לאינפורמציה אלטרנטיבית, אליהם הצטרפו קואליציית הנשים למען השלום ו”גוש שלום”.[5] גם במקרה זה היתה חשיבות עצומה לשיתוף הפעולה המקומי עם פעילים פוליטיים פלסטיניים מן השטחים הכבושים – אנשי הוועד להגנה על הקרקעות. במערכה סבלנית וממושכת נגד ההתנחלות והנישול הם השכילו לגשר בין מאבקה של הקהילה המקומית על זכויותיה להקשר הפוליטי הכללי. מאז 1999 מנסים השלטונות לגרש את תושבי אזור סוסיא, שחלקם מתגוררים במערות, מגדלים צאן ומעבדים את אדמותיהם בגבעות הצחיחות שמדרום ליטא. מולם ניצבות כמה מן ההתנחלויות התוקפניות ביותר שבשטחים הכבושים. תרומתה המיוחדת של תעאיוש למערכה היתה ביצירת פעולות מחאה וסולידריות רחבות, רבות משתתפים, שנועדו, ראשית, לחזק את אחיזתם של תושבי המקום באדמותיהם מול הברית הבלתי-קדושה של הצבא, המתנחלים והמנהל האזרחי ושנית, לשבור את תמונת האויב ולהביא אלפי אזרחים ישראלים להזדהות – בעיצומו של עימות מזוין – עם התושבים הפלסטינים של דרום הר חברון וזכויותיהם האנושיות. שיירות האספקה יצרו יחסי אמון וקירבה, שאפשרו לפעילי תעאיוש ששהו במקום להתייצב לצד התושבים בשעת נסיון גירוש מקומי ולסכל אותו. לאחר גירוש נוסף, שבוצע באישון לילה, יצאה למקום משלחת סולידריות, שיצרה חגורה אנושית כדי לאפשר לתושבים לשוב לאדמותיהם. התמיכה בתושבים הפלסטיניים הוציאה גם את המתנחלים מריבצם. הם ניסו למנוע את פעולותינו, לחסום את דרכן של השיירות ולהתעמת עם הפעילים. אך בעוד שבשנה האחרונה צוברים המתנחלים אהדה רבה בציבור הישראלי, במקרה זה נתפסו הם כצד התוקפן. במקום החזית המוכרת, המציבה יהודים מול ערבים ויוצרת הזדהות אוטומטית בציבור היהודי עם המתנחלים, נוצרה כאן חזית משותפת, ישראלית-פלסטינית, נגד הכיבוש. השילוב בין פעולה רחבה, השתתפותית, יד ביד עם אנשי המקום – עם מערכה ציבורית ומשפטית, המגיעה עד בית-המשפט העליון, יכול להיות דגם למאבקים עתידיים. נכון לשעת כתיבת הדברים, תושבי דרום הר-חברון יושבים כיום על אדמתם, אך האיום עדיין מרחף מעל ראשיהם.

4.

שלוש הדוגמאות הללו – שיירות הסולידריות, מחנה העבודה בדאר-אלחנון והמערכה נגד גירוש תושבי הר חברון – מבהירות, אנו מקווים, כמה מעקרונות הפעולה שהתפתחו בתעאיוש מאז הקמתה: הנסיון לחרוג מן ההגדרה הצרה של פעולה פוליטית, המצמצמת אותה לאקטים סמליים – כדי להשיב לפוליטיקה את המימד הקונקרטי, החומרי והמקומי שלה; הבחירה המודעת בפעולה פוליטית בלתי-אלימה; מתוך מודעות ליחסי הכוחות הקיימים, הנסיון לבחור זירות ואופני פעולה, שיציבו את משטר הכיבוש והאפליה במגננה ויאפשרו לאנשים להזדהות עם הפעולה. כוחן של פעולות בלתי-אלימות כאלה הוא בכך שהן רחבות והשתתפותיות במידת האפשר – שהן מאפשרות למירב האנשים להשתתף בהן ולהזדהות איתן.

הבחירה בשם ‘תעאיוש’ הייתה מלווה בלא מעט לבטים. אנו מודעים לכך, שכיוון שבעברית כמו בשפות אחרות אין מונח מקביל ל’תעאיוש’, יש המתרגמים את המושג “תעאיוש” לעברית כ”דו-קיום”. אל זאת כוונתנו. לא ייתכן תעאיוש בתנאים של אי-שוויון, של יחסי כוח ושליטה, בחברות בהן מושרשת אידיאולוגיית ההפרדה. לרעיון התעאיוש יש מימד אוטופי, הרחוק מאוד מהמציאות הממשית בה אנו חיים. מאידך גיסא, יש בכוחו להצביע על חלופה לעימות הלאומי ולכל הסדר פוליטי, שלא ישנה את היסודות הקולוניאליים של העימות ולא יהיה מבוסס על שוויון וצדק. הפעולות המשותפות החותרות תחת הכיבוש וההפרדה בונות כאן ועכשיו, בהווה, את היסודות לשותפות עתידית, להפיכת התעאיוש מחזון למציאות חברתית. הפעולות האלה לא רק יוצרות שותפות ערבית-יהודית, אלא גם מקרבות את הפעילים למימדים של מציאות חברתית שלא תמיד הכירו. נחשפים מקורות נוספים של דיכוי ואי שוויון, מעבר לקולוניזציה והעימות הלאומי. הבכורה של הלכידות הלאומית בסדר היום הפוליטי ובתודעה של רוב האוכלוסייה היהודית והערבית מאפשרת להסוות ולמזער סתירות חברתיות מסוגים שונים, הכרוכות בדיכוי, ניצול וסבל. הריבוד החברתי הקולוניאלי אמנם גורם לכך שלשאלות חברתיות רבות יש מימד לאומי. אך השאלות האלה לא יכולות להצטמצם לשאלה הלאומית. הפוליטיקה של הקונקרטי, הנוגעת בבעיות היומיומיות של בני האדם, מאפשרת להם לא לדחוק את ענייניהם הממשיים כמי שמופלים לרעה או מנוצלים על בסיס מעמדי, מגדרי, תרבותי, עדתי, דתי, שייכות משפחתית או אחר, מפני עניינם הלאומי או עמדתם בנושא הסכסוך הלאומי והשלום. היציאה לפעולה מחוץ לגדרות, כנגד הגדרות והדיכוי, עשויה לא רק לתרום למאבק לסיום הכיבוש ולשלום צודק ושוויון, אלא גם לאפשר לאנשים להשתחרר מהגדרות המנטליות, להיאבק על ענייניהם ולמצוא שותפים חדשים ומגוונים. זהו הסיוט של הממסד הקולוניאלי.

ברורות לנו גם מגבלות הכוח שלנו ושל הכוחות השותפים לנו בהתנגדות הפוליטית מול מדיניות ההרס, הכיבוש והנישול. הסיבוב האחרון של הפעולות הצבאיות המחיש את יחסי הכוחות השוררים ואת מגבלות תנועות המחאה והסולידריות בישראל, ובכלל זה את המגבלות של דפוסי הפעולה שפיתחנו בתעאיוש. מכאן האחריות שמוטלת עלינו: למצוא דפוסי פעולה נוספים שיאפשרו לפתח ולהעמיק את ההתנגדות לכיבוש, לחתור תחת משטר ההפרדה ולבנות חלופה של שותפות שוויונית. זה אתגר העומד בפני כולנו.

מפעולות תעאיוש, נובמבר 2000—מאי 200212 שיירות סולידריות לשטחים הכבושים, בהשתתפות אלפים מאזרחי ישראל, מאז דצמבר 2000דוכני איסוף מזון ותרומות בישובים יהודים וערבים למען תושבי השטחים הכבושים הנתונים בסגרמערכה נגד גירוש תושבי דרום הר-חברון, הנמשכת מאז יולי 2001משמרת מחאה יהודית-ערבית ביום האדמה בואדי ערה, ליד ערערה, מארס 2001מחנה עבודה התנדבותי בכפר הבלתי-מוכר דאר אל-חנון במשולש, אוגוסט 2001מחנה עבודה התנדבותי בכפר הבלתי-מוכר ח’רבת אלוטן בנגב, מאי 2002משמרת מחאה מול משרד הבטחון בתל-אביב במחאה על פציעתו של עיסא סוף, תושב חארס, יוני 2001תרומת דם קולקטיבית בבית-החולים אל-מקאסד למען הפצועים במחנות הפליטים, מרץ 2002ארגון מפגשים של תלמידי תיכון ערבים לפני בגרות עם סטודנטים ומרצים באוניברסיטת תל-אביבמשלחת סולידריות המונית לרמאללה, ינואר 2002תהלוכה של אלפי יהודים וערבים למחסום ג’נין יחד עם ועדת המערב העליונה של ערביי ישראל, אפריל 2002הפגנה מול מחסום טול-כרם, מרס 2002השתתפות במאבקם של תושבי עיסאויה נגד הכתר, להסרת המחסום ונגד העוצר על השכונההשתתפות במאבק תושבי טירה וטייבה נגד כביש חוצה ישראלאיסוף תרומות למען תושבי מחנה הפליטים ברפיח (אוקטובר 2001-יוני 2002)הפגנת אלפים יהודית-ערבית במחסום א-ראם והעברת 4 משאיות סיוע לרמאללה, אפריל 2002הפגנה מול מחנה אנצאר בנגב והעברת סיוע לעצירים, יוני 2002שיירת מכוניות נושאות דגלים שחורים ב-1.10.2001, יום השנה להריגתם של 13 פלסטינים אזרחי ישראל בידי כוחות הבטחון ומשמרת מחאה מאולתרת באום-אל-פאחם בזמן ההתנגשויות של התושבים עם כוחות המשטרההשתתפות במאבקם של תושבי שכונת שיח’ ג’ראח נגד הריסות בתים ונישולהשתתפות בשתי הפגנות המוניות בתל-אביב מטעם הקואליציה היהודית-ערבית לסיום הכיבוש, פברואר 2002 ומאי 2002ימי עבודה התנדבותיים בעין נקובה (הרי ירושלים) ובעין ח’וד (אזור חיפה)משמרות מחאה ברמלה נגד מעצר תושבי לוד שהואשמו בהתקהלות בלתי-חוקית בשל השתתפות במשמרת מחאה נגד הכיבוש (אפריל 2002)אוהל מחאה נגד הכיבוש והאפליה, יפו, מאי 2002השתתפות סולידרית במאבקם של תושבי מג’ד אלכרום נגד הריסת בית, יוני 2002

* “נתקלתי / במחסומים בדרכים / הראיתי את התעודה / וחיפשו בידי ובכלי. / חשתי כזר / שנקלע לעיר נוכרית.” “אני מן הדרום”. טקסט: חסן אלעבד אללה, לחן: מרסל ח’ליפה.

[1] דוד בן-גוריון, “צבא להגנה ולבניין”, (1948), יחוד ויעוד: דברים על בטחון ישראל (תל-אביב: משרד הבטחון, 1971), עמ’ 44-52, כאן: עמ’ 51.

[2] חשוב להבהיר את ההבדל בין גדר וגבול. הגבול המדיני אמור להבדיל בין קיבוצים אנושיים ריבוניים, ולאפשר להם מגע-ומשא אנושי, מרצונם ולפי בחירתם. הגדר — גם גדר המכלאה — מקיפה את הנשלטים, אבל בשום פנים ואופן אינה מגבילה את השליטים; היא חדירה לחלוטין מצד אחד, כפי שהוכיחה מאז ישראל ב”פעולות תגמול”, “פעולות עונשין”, “סיכול ממוקד” ו”מבצעי מנע”. בדומה לכך חובה להבהיר, כי תעאיוש אינו טמיעה: אין פירושו ויתור על זהות תרבותית, אלא החופש לחיות ביחד ולפתח זהות ללא דיכוי והגמוניה. זהות חברתית, כמו זהות אישית, היא תהליך פתוח של אינטראקציה בין-אנושית.

[3] ראו דו”ח מפורט באתר תעאיוש: taayush.tripod.com.

[4] מחנה העבודה המרכזי, שנערך ביוזמת עיריית נצרת, היה מסגרת ייחודית, שתוך כדי ביצוע פרויקט לרווחת תושבי העיר הפגישה את תושבי המקום ופלסטינים אזרחי ישראל עם פעילי שמאל יהודים ופעילים פלסטיניים מן השטחים הכבושים.

[5] ראו דיווח מפורט באתר תעאיוש וכן באתר המיוחד המוקדש למאבק: www.southebron.com.

This entry was posted on Tuesday, July 2nd, 2002 at 23:00

Expatriates Besmirch Israel for Political Gain: Haim Yacobi and Irit Katz a Case in Point

03.02.22
Editorial Note

Two Israeli political activists based in British universities, Profs. Haim Yacobi and Irit Katz published an article titled “Jerusalem: evictions show how urban planning is being weaponized against Palestinians.” The article disputes Israeli sovereignty in East Jerusalem. 

According to the authors, the Israeli authority admits that houses built before 1967 are legal. Therefore, houses built after 1967 without planning permission are illegal. It is not hard to imagine that many houses were built illegally, for political reasons, as large segments of the Palestinian population in East Jerusalem oppose Israeli sovereignty. They wish the area to be part of the Palestinian capital when the Palestinian state comes into being. The authors do not hide the fact that they support them. 

Yacobi and Katz went on to discuss a case where the Israeli authorities expropriated property to establish a school for children with special needs for the neighborhood’s residents. But, for the authors, “this ‘top-down’ planning did not include any consultation with the family or the community.” The authors forget that practices for local authorities to consult residents when establishing a building for the public benefit are not that common. 

There are many cases of land disputes in Israel, both in the Jewish and Arab sectors, that involve house demolitions

Recently, the Sheikh Jarrah neighborhood attracted attention. The Israeli media reported in November 2021 that the Palestinian families in the Sheikh Jarrah neighborhood in East Jerusalem rejected a compromise proposed by the Israeli Supreme Court last month that would make them “protected tenants” and leave them in their homes for 15 years – or until a settlement is reached. The neighborhood spokesman explained, “This refusal comes from our belief in the justice of our cause and our right to our homes and homeland, despite the lack of guaranty to strengthen our Palestinian presence in occupied Jerusalem by any party or institution.” The media added in their report, “The Palestinian residents claim that in 1956 they purchased houses built in the Sheikh Jarrah neighborhood by the Jordanian Ministry of Housing. They or their fathers received agreements according to which they waived a “refugee certificate” and received the apartments at their disposal in return. According to them, no arrangement was made for the land. Later on, the land came into the hands of Nahalat Shimon, which claims that it lawfully acquired the rights from committees that owned the land before 1948 and even renewed the registration in 1972. The District Court accepted the “Nahalat Shimon” claim and ruled that the families who appealed this decision should be evacuated.”

Yacobi and Katz also claim that the “Recent events in Sheikh Jarrah clearly mark the current phase in colonizing Jerusalem. This is a micro-scale appropriation of Palestinian territory accompanied by evictions and displacements of Palestinians who remain in the city. Palestinian homes are demolished or colonized by settlers such as in the case of Silwan and Sheikh Jarrah.”

The authors pay no respect to the Israeli courts that examined the documents held by both parties, the Palestinians and the Jews. 

However, according to a Peace Now report, from January 18, 2022, the Sallehiya family was evacuated because, “The Sallehiya family is a Palestinian refugee family originally from the village of Ein Karem, who settled in Sheikh Jarrah, according to the family, before 1967. In 1984, the district planning committee approved a building plan (Plan No. 2591) for the neighborhood, and designated the plot on which the family home and [gardening] nursery were built, for public use. On 3/7/2017, the municipality announced the expropriation of the plot for the purpose of constructing a public building in accordance with the approved plan. The landowners filed an objection to the expropriation but the court dismissed their petition. It should be noted that the Israeli law allows expropriation of private property for public purposes and property owners are entitled to compensation. About a year ago, the Jerusalem Municipality began to work on detailed planning for the construction of a school and kindergartens for the Palestinians on the plot, and initiated eviction proceedings against the Sallehiya family at the Execution Office. The Execution Office set the time of the eviction of the family to be carried out during the month of January 2022.”

It is questionable if people who have no title deed to land should be entitled to live in a property they do not own nor pay rent for. According to Yacobi and Katz, Palestinians have such a right, as it fits with their radical narrative of colonization.  

Over the years, Israel Academia Monitor has discussed the large number of Israeli expats who teach social science in British universities.  Our analysis indicates that many are radical activists who were apparently hired to produce research that besmirches the State of Israel. 

It is probably not a coincidence that Amnesty International UK has recently produced a report that charges Israel as an apartheid state.   Israeli officials have described the report as antisemitic according to the standards of the International Holocaust Remembrance Alliance (IHRA) working definition of antisemitism.  As a rule, human rights groups use academic research to prove their case and, more to the point, some academic activists help to draft these kinds of reports. Prof. Oren Yiftachel admitted to co-writing the earlier BT’selem report which charged Israel of apartheid.

A more balanced view of the Israeli-Palestinian conflict is impossible as long as British universities recruit Israeli expats because of their skills in trashing Israel.  Even better, maybe scarce departmental resources should be used to hire experts on Iran or other countries which violate human rights on a grand scale. As it stands, little has been written on these countries and their long-suffering population. 

References:

https://theconversation.com/jerusalem-evictions-show-how-urban-planning-is-being-weaponised-against-palestinians-175690
 The Conversation
Academic rigour, journalistic flairJerusalem: evictions show how urban planning is being weaponised against Palestinians

January 27, 2022 2.30pm GMT  

  1. Haim Yacobi Professor of Development Planning, UCL  
  2. Irit Katz Assistant Professor in Architecture and Urban Studies, University of Cambridge

One olive in my garden is better than anything material in the whole world.

These sad words were uttered by Mahmoud Salhiya after his home in Sheikh Jarrah was recently demolished by Israeli forces.

Sheikh Jarrah is a Palestinian neighbourhood of 3,000 inhabitants at the eastern part of Road 1 that runs north to south through Jerusalem and separates Israeli and Palestinian sectors. The neighbourhood has two distinctive sections: the north is the part inhabited by wealthier Palestinians while the poorer, southern part is populated by hundreds of Palestinian refugees from 1948.

The Salhiya family house is in Sheikh Jarrah’s southern area on land designated by an old urban scheme authorised in the 1980s for the construction of a public building. But part of the house already existed, along with some other structures, when the plan was being prepared. In fact, the house and the other buildings on the plot are already visible on maps of Jerusalem from the 1930s.

Importantly, according to the Jerusalem Municipality itself, Palestinian houses built in East Jerusalem before 1967 are considered legal and therefore cannot be demolished. But zoning the Salhiya plot for public use – which ignored the fact of the existing residential property already on the site – is indicative of a common practice that has characterised Israeli planning of East Jerusalem since 1967.

The Israeli authorities argued that the Salhiya property had been expropriated to establish a “special needs” school for the benefit of the neighbourhood’s residents. But this “top-down” planning did not include any consultation with the family or the community.

Demolition as a tool of control

The police are reported to have arrived at the property in the early hours of what was one of the coldest nights so far this winter, and forcibly removed 15 members of the Salhiya family before bulldozing the house. They arrested Mahmoud Salhiya and five members of his family, as well as some of their supporters, both Palestinian and Israeli activists.

This traumatic event is part of an ongoing attempt of displacing Palestinians from their homes – not only in Sheikh Jarrah but also in other neighbourhoods such as Silwan, on the outskirts of the Old City, which is the subject of the continuing conflict between Jewish settlers and the local Palestinian community over archaeology, tourism development and housing.

Housing demolitions have become an all-too-regular occurrence. According to a report by B’tselem (the Israeli information centre for human rights in the occupied territories) between 2006 and November 2021, Israeli authorities demolished at least 1,176 Palestinian housing units in East Jerusalem. At least 3,769 people lost their homes – including 1,996 children. Housing demolition serves Israel’s attempt to control the city’s “demographic balance” – keeping a Jewish majority within Jerusalem’s municipal territory back to the 70:30 ratio that has driven Israeli policy since 1967.

Emerging urban geopolitics

The Salhiya family’s case should be understood within a wider context of the political processes taking place in Jerusalem since June 1967 and the declaration of the city as Israel’s unified capital. The expropriation of Palestinian land by the state through legal measures was central to the colonisation of East Jerusalem at this stage.

Planning further contributed to the colonisation of the city and was characterised by the construction of settlements (“satellite neighbourhoods”). Since 1967, Israel has expropriated over one-third of the Palestinian land that was annexed to Jerusalem’s municipality new boundaries – 24.5 square kilometres – most of it privately owned by Palestinians. Some 11 neighbourhoods have been erected for Jewish inhabitants only.

Under international law, the status of these neighbourhoods is the same as the Israeli illegal settlements throughout the West Bank. As a complementary step, a series of masterplans were drawn that have effectively limited the growth of Palestinian neighbourhoods by limiting construction rights and defining most Palestinian land as not eligible for housing construction.

The beginning of the 21st century marked a shift into a more radical policy in Jerusalem with the construction of the separation barrier. This has allowed Israel to de facto annex another 160 square kilometres of the Occupied Territories.

The route of the barrier creates a sharp division between the walled city of Jerusalem and the Palestinian hinterland. The concrete barrier deliberately disrupts the functional integration of Palestinian neighbourhoods and isolates them from their hinterland in the West Bank.Separation: how the barrier has affected Jerusalem’s Palestinian communities. ir-amin, Author provided

The construction of the separation barrier has placed the vast majority of territory and resources in the Jerusalem metropolitan under Jewish control. Palestinians are confined to disjointed enclaves, without sovereignty, freedom of movement, control over natural resources, or contiguous territory.

Micro colonisation

Recent events in Sheikh Jarrah clearly mark the current phase in colonising Jerusalem. This is a micro-scale appropriation of Palestinian territory accompanied by evictions and displacements of Palestinians who remain in the city. Palestinian homes are demolished or colonised by settlers such as in the case of Silwan and Sheikh Jarrah while agricultural land is confiscated from its Palestinian owners – as in the case of Walajeh where the separation barrier surrounds the village and cuts it off from most of its inhabitants’ land.

This is a new phase in which Palestinian space is appropriated not solely through military acts or large-scale urban planning (such as described above) but rather on small-scale urban spaces and the use of planning policies. These include land-use changes, planning for the apparent “public good” (such as the attempt to build a school on Salhiya’s plot in Sheikh Jarrah), infrastructure development and touristic development. There is also clear discrimination in the distribution of building permits. While 38% of the city’s residents are Palestinians, only 16.5% of the building permits were given for construction in Palestinian neighbourhoods.

In this way, Jerusalem has become a model for using “banal” apparatuses such as urban planning to reinforce Israeli domination of this divided and contested city.

****We are grateful to Dr Mandy Turner for providing the translation of Mahmoud Salhiya’s words at the opening of this article and the linked video.

****
University College London provides funding as a founding partner of The Conversation UK. University of Cambridge provides funding as a member of The Conversation UK.

Tantura Back in the Spotlight

27.01.22

Editorial Note

The battle of Tantura in the War of Independence is back in the spotlight. Akevot, an anti-Israel Israeli NGO, the house of several anti-Israel Israeli academics, advised the director of a new film on the Tantura battle, as Dr. Adam Raz, the researcher at Akevot, has written in Haaretz.   

The Tantura affair had come up already in the late 1990s when Theodore (Teddy) Katz wrote an MA thesis at the University of Haifa accusing the Alexandroni Brigade of executing a massacre of the Tantura Arab villagers during the war. Katz interviewed 70 witnesses in 140 hours of recordings. However, Katz’s thesis was shelved after the Alexandroni veterans initiated a legal proceeding.   The Alexandroni fighters accused Katz of falsifications since his recordings did not match his writing.

Katz admitted he received $8000 in cash from a Palestinian Authority research center to defend his case in court, a month before the Second Intifada erupted.

Katz signed an apology to the Alexandroni Brigade which stated, “I would like to clarify that after re-examining the matter, it is clear to me beyond any doubt that there is absolutely no foundation for the allegation that a massacre was committed in Tantura by the Alexandroni Brigade soldiers or by any other Jewish fighting group. Let me clarify that what I wrote was also evidently misunderstood, as I did not intend to state that a massacre took place in Tantura and even today I state that there was no massacre at Tantura. I believe the Alexandroni veterans who emphatically denied the massacre, and I retract every part of my thesis that implies that there was a massacre or that defenseless and unprotected people. In light of the above, I believe I owe a sincere apology to the Alexandroni veterans, their families and the families of the Alexandroni men who died in battle for leveling such false accusations against them. This apology will be published in an appropriate section of a major newspaper.”

This was not the end, as Katz withdrew his apology soon after signing it.

Now the film director and Akevot reopened the case but did not provide new evidence. IAM reported on Akevot before, in June 2021, “Hostile NGO Akevot Attracting Israeli Academia.” IAM noted that Akevot only provides information that presents Israel in a negative light. As an institute working for the “collection and accessibility of information concerning the Israeli-Palestinian conflict.” It collects money as “protectors of human rights.” The purpose of Akevot, as stated on the NGOs Registrar website, is researching the “belligerent” manner of control of Israel in the territories occupied by it. Akevot was founded in 2013 and was housed with Adv. Michael Sfard, a “lawyer and political activist” who advances the idea that Israel is an apartheid state. 

The Alexandroni Brigade published their account on “Operation Port – Opening of the Road to Haifa,” as follows: “With the liberation of Haifa, the departure of the Arabs of Caesarea and the separation of the Arab villages located along the Zichron Yaacov Road, the enemy was left with only one base in these villages to maintain the external connection by sea, it was the village of Tantura, located on the beach, north-west of Zichron Yaacov. Then, it is no wonder that the village soon became the main supply base for all the surrounding villages. A fleet of dozens of boats and small ships maintained regular contact with Lebanon, sailed in for Tantura supplies, weapons, and equipment, and took fleeing refugees to Lebanon. As a result of this supply, the harassment of Jewish transportation on the Tel Aviv-Haifa road increased by the villagers of the “Little Triangle,” to the point that the road was completely blocked by the rioters. The importance of Tantura was in its ability to preserve the momentum of Arab harassment on Jewish transportation between Tel Aviv and Haifa. The location of this enemy base within our territory was more serious than could be reconciled.  Attempts to negotiate with the villagers for surrender, a negotiation conducted by one of the Hagana personnel in Zichron Yaacov who was in close contact with the village dignitaries before the outbreak of the war. The negotiations failed due to the opposition of the village’s young people and foreigners who were in it, unlike what happened in Fureidis and Jisr-a-Zarqa, where the residents agreed to surrender. In light of the failure of the negotiations, it was decided to occupy the village and purge the beach of enemy forces. According to the intelligence in our hands, there were about 300 fighters in the village, equipped with about 100 rifles, several dozen pistols, and submachine guns, a number of 3” mortars, and a 40-millimeter Bofors cannon (this information was not confirmed). At the head of the fighters were about four Englishmen, British army defectors, Arab police defectors, and a number of Bosnian Muslim fighters. The task was assigned to the 33rd Battalion of the Alexandroni Brigade.  An early tour of the commanders was conducted via a train journey from Hadera to Atlit. The train still operated under the auspices of the British, who held the area of the port of Haifa. At the request of the patrol commander, the train near Tantura slowed down to get a broader idea. As the train stopped at Zichron Yaacov station, it was attacked by an Egyptian plane that missed it. In retrospect, it turned out that the intelligence was quite accurate. In light of the intelligence and reconnaissance, it was decided on the course of action: Attack on two main axes – Company A moves north, crosses the railway, splits into three heads, and simultaneously attacks the ruins of al-Burj on the beach, the “glazier” (the glass factory established by Baron Rothschild) and the village to the north and east. Company C will move from the train station in Zichron, between the track and the beach, and will attack from the south. A force from Company B will attack the school on the hill that dominates the village to the east. The rest of the force from Company B will serve as a reserve force. The auxiliary weapons Company will open fire machine guns and mortars for the stated aid purposes, and a naval unit will block the enemy’s escape from the sea. The operation date was set for May 23, 1948, after midnight. At the point of attack, the movement to the destination began as planned, but Company A was discovered upon crossing the railroad, and then the rest of the forces were ordered to storm in. The operation went as planned, despite skillful and precise sniper fire from the eastern hill ridge that slowed the movement of the force. After a heavy battle from house to house, extensive use of hand grenades, and the elimination of about ten snipers, the battle ended at about 08:00. The forces were prepared for perimeter defense, units engaged in collecting weapons and concentrated the men for interrogation and identification and transferring them along with the rest of the residents to other places, decided and done by other authorities and units. The enemy had about 70 killed. In the battle for the conquest of Tantura, 14 warriors fell. One of the fallen fighters was from the Navy.”

In his book, The Birth of the Palestinian Refugee Problem Revisited, Prof. Benny Morris discussed the “Tantura Massacre” in page 301. He acknowledges that “there is evidence that Alexandroni troops… executed POWs.” and that “A few days after the conquest of Tantura, Ya‘akov Epstein, of Zikhron Ya‘akov, the Ministry for Minority Affairs’ man in the moshava and its longstanding liaison with Tantura, prepared a report. He had arrived in the village minutes or hours after the completion of the conquest, on the morning of 23 May. He reported that he had seen bodies everywhere – ‘in the [village] outskirts, in the streets, in the alleys, in the village houses’ – and had had a hand in organizing their burial. But he had made no mention of a recently completed or ongoing massacre of any sort. On the contrary, he had seen women and children and adult males sitting on the shore and had moved among them in order to identify, at the Haganah’s request, any possible strangers. And he had asked the Alexandroni commander to see to it that villagers were removed from the site and not allowed to remain lest ‘vengeful’ Haganah troops attack them. But he had made no mention of a massacre or of allegations of a massacre.”

Morris mentions another account on Tantura, “a refugee from Tantura, Mahmoud al Yihiya Yihiya, in August 1998 (Dar al Shara, Damascus) published a book on his village, entitled Al Tantura, in which he described the battle and named the village dead, 52 in all, from May 1948 (pp. 117–126 and 143–146). He made no mention of a massacre. It is probable that some of the 52 were unarmed villagers killed in the course of the battle; but this is a far cry from the dozens or hundreds Katz and his Arab ‘witnesses’ claimed were massacred. In the absence of documentary proof to the contrary, the silences of the plaintive women refugees who reached the West Bank in June 1948, of Epstein (in May and June 1948) and of Yihiya concerning a largescale massacre must strike the historian as outstandingly odd if a massacre had indeed taken place.”


The account of Yihiya is brought in full by Prof. Yoav Gelber. Mahmoud al-Yahiya Yahya, Al-Tantura. Damascus: Dar al-Shajra to Lansher and al-Tuzia, 1998 pp. 119-123, wrote the following, “A few days after the conquest of the village Lam, the time of Tantura has come. The Jews attacked it in the evening, but the young people of the village defended it with all their might and forced the attacking invaders to retreat after leaving behind many dead and wounded who fell in the wheat fields east of the village, but the Jews did not like it as it angered them. They returned from all sides and the sea the following day, concentrated on the shore near the village houses in the early morning and began a fierce attack. The situation of the inhabitants of Tantura at this dangerous time was like that of the famous Arab commander Tarek Ben Ziad on the day he raided Spain and burned the ships that led his forces to the Spanish mainland and then told them, ‘The sea is behind you, and the enemy is in front of you, and God has nothing but justice and patience.’ The youngsters of the village defended their houses and land until the last bullet, then ceased, and then the Jews entered the village and in their minds revenge instead of respect for those people who defended their beautiful village and their houses and land, and opened fire on anyone whose gaze fell on him and killed in a humiliating way also women. Then they carried out an order, killing in the village and even those men whom they employed to collect the bodies in the village streets, in front of their wives, children, and mothers who collected them near a pit they dug at the northern end, for them to see with their own eyes. When the Jewish soldiers entered Tantura, 52 victims of Tantura and their names were on the list of Tantura victims, and there were also seven wounded. Here is what happened to the other residents of Tantura: The Jews took them as prisoners, the old, the young who were alive, to a prison camp in Kafar Jalil, and the women, children, and elderly-women to Fureidis nearby and after staying there for a few days, they moved to Tulkarm and then to Nablus and then to Syria. Here, I have no alternative but to go back to the point of the Jewish forces who were called the Hagana, the “defense,” to say these were not defense forces but wild offensive forces that one who is unscrupulous and lack human character and humanity and who does not act according to the laws of war. Is there a law that allows a soldier to kill people in the streets after they have surrendered and after their rifles become sticks after the ammunition has run out? Here are some examples of this barbarism: 1. The same soldiers ordered five young men from the village to collect the bodies from the village streets and led them in trucks to the pit we mentioned. After collecting bodies, they were standing in front of the pit facing the corpses, then one of the officers of the Hagana shot them from the back, and they fell into the pit on the other corpses. 2. A woman was shot from a treacherous bullet with a breastfed baby in her arms. When she fell to the ground, her baby fell beside her while he was crying and approached his mother’s body looking for a breast to suckle and walked away from her because she was lifeless. 3. A mother of three boys, one of whom was killed by a treacherous bullet when Jewish forces entered the village, the second boy was one of five who were tasked with collecting the bodies from the village streets. When he saw that his brother had died, he kneeled over and kissed him. The soldiers shot him above his brother, and he died. While the third brother was near his mother who was sitting among the women near the pit. One of the bloodthirsty Hagana people came and wanted to kill two or three young men sitting by the pit. The officer in charge objected and told him to take only one of them. His choice fell on the third son of that woman, he dragged him a few feet away, shot him in front of his poor mother, and killed him. 4. Directly east of the village, the Jewish soldiers discovered two peaceful people who had no weapons. They demanded of them to stand in front of a high rock with the intention of shooting them in the back as was their custom. Suddenly one of the Jews of Zamarin (Zichron Yaacov) who accompanied this crazy action appeared, who knew one of the two, Yahya bin Muhammad Khachar al-Machi from the village, he had an honest advocate and spoke well of him about his human qualities throughout his life, so they spared him and shot his friend the late Mustafa Abu Jamus. 5. An old woman who came out of her house leaning on a stick was shot to death by the soldiers for no reason. 6. One of the residents of Tantura named Sheikh Suleiman al-Rashid al-Hussein al-Yahya suffered from exhaustion in his mind after studying at Al-Azhar University in Egypt for several years and received a certificate in Islamic studies. This man came from Haifa to Tantura on the second day of conquest. He arrived without knowing that the Jewish soldiers had entered the village. When he entered the threshing floor of the village, without warning, he was shot by a Jewish soldier and fell dead into the rainwater canal near the threshing floor and was left sitting on his knee and remained as they say for two whole days until he was buried in the same water canal. What happened to Tantura prisoners after they were taken to the Jalil detention camp? They suffered greatly for eight months and were exchanged for Jewish prisoners captured by the Arab armies. The Tantura prisoners were transferred to Tulkarem, then went out with their families to Syria or remained in the area… Here, it is only to be noted that the women did not escape the horrors of the Jewish soldiers while searching on them before they were taken out of Tantura and transferred to Fureidis. They behaved disgustingly and criminally and took from them everything they had, like jewelry and money, and when these women came with their children to Syria, they were destitute.”

Clearly, the account by Yihiya paints the Alexandroni Brigade negatively, but does not mention committing a massacre. 

Alon Schwartz, the film director, tells about his motives in an interview titled “We Must Compare the Nakba with the Holocaust – and Say How Different it is.” Schwartz discusses how he met Teddy Katz, “He came to Katz almost by accident, as part of an investigation he conducted three years ago into a series that he tried to develop on the decline of Israeli democracy. One of the chapters was devoted to the activities of the left-wing non-governmental organizations – B’Tselem, Ta’ayush, and Breaking the Silence. When the initiative to document the current political reality in Israel failed, he turned to history, and the search for precedents for the phenomenon led him to Teddy Katz and his research. “I was depressed from Bibi’s time and felt I had to do something to vent my frustration in a creative way, but after the original project got stuck, I discovered a man named Teddy Katz.” 

Akevot and Schwartz should take note, AlJazeera reported a few days ago that “The Palestinian Authority (PA) has called for the formation of an international commission to investigate the massacres committed by Israel in the Palestinian village of Tantura in 1948. The call came after Israeli daily Haaretz reported on Thursday the discovery of a mass grave in Tantura village of Palestinians killed by Zionist gangs in 1948, when the modern state of Israel was formed.”

The difference in versions between Yihiya’s and the Alexandroni’s accounts is evident.   But Alon Schwartz tried to compare the treatment of the Arabs in the 1948 war to the extermination of six million Jews in the Holocaust.  The International Holocaust Remembrance Alliance (IHRA) definition of antisemitism, which an increasing number of countries adopted, defines such comparisons as antisemitism.  Ironically, academics and others have pushed the “Tantura massacre” for decades in order to portray Israel as a Nazi-like state.

References:

https://www.aurdip.org/there-s-a-mass-palestinian-grave.html
There’s a Mass Palestinian Grave at a Popular Israeli Beach, Veterans Confess
The Israeli veterans of the 1948 battle at Tantura village finally come clean about the mass killing of Arabs that took place after the village’s surrender

Adam Raz
Jan. 20, 2022 8:26 PM
“They silenced it,” the former combat soldier Moshe Diamant says, trying to be spare with his words. “It mustn’t be told, it could cause a whole scandal. I don’t want to talk about it, but it happened. What can you do? It happened.”
Twenty-two years have passed since the furor erupted over the account of what occurred during the conquest by Israeli troops of the village of Tantura, north of Caesarea on the Mediterranean coast, in the War of Independence. The controversy sprang up in the wake of a master’s thesis written by an Israeli graduate student named Theodore Katz, that contained testimony about atrocities perpetrated by the Alexandroni Brigade against Arab prisoners of war. The thesis led to the publication of an article in the newspaper Maariv headlined “The Massacre at Tantura.” Ultimately, a libel suit filed against Katz by veterans of the brigade induced him to retract his account of a massacre.
For years, Katz’s findings were archived, and discussion of the episode took the form of a professional debate between historians. Until now. Now, at the age of 90 and up, a number of combat soldiers from the Israel Defense Forces’ brigade have admitted that a massacre did indeed take place in 1948 at Tantura – today’s popular Dor Beach, adjacent to Kibbutz Nahsholim. The former soldiers describe different scenes in different ways, and the number of villagers who were shot to death can’t be established. The numbers arising from the testimonies range from a handful who were killed, to many dozens. According to one testimony, provided by a resident of Zichron Yaakov who helped bury the victims, the number of dead exceeded 200, though this high figure does not have corroboration.
According to Diamant, speaking now, villagers were shot to death by a “savage” using a submachine gun, at the conclusion of the battle. He adds that in connection with the libel suit in 2000, the former soldiers tacitly understood that they would pretend that nothing unusual had occurred after the village’s conquest. “We didn’t know, we didn’t hear. Of course everyone knew. They all knew.”  
Another combat soldier, Haim Levin, now relates that a member of the unit went over to a group of 15 or 20 POWs “and killed them all.” Levin says he was appalled, and he spoke to his buddies to try to find out what was going on. “You have no idea how many [of us] those guys have killed,” he was told.

Another combat soldier in the brigade, Micha Vitkon, talked about an officer “who in later years was a big man in the Defense Ministry. With his pistol he killed one Arab after another. He was a bit disturbed, and that was a symptom of his disturbance.” According to Vitkon, the soldier did what he did because the prisoners refused to divulge where they had hidden the remaining weapons in the village.
Another combat soldier described a different incident that occurred there: “It’s not nice to say this. They put them into a barrel and shot them in the barrel. I remember the blood in the barrel.” One of the soldiers summed up by saying that his comrades-in-arms simply didn’t behave like human beings in the village – and then resumed his silence.

“I was a murderer. I didn’t take prisoners,” says Amitzur Cohen. How many Arabs did he kill outside the framework of the battles? “I didn’t count. I had a machine gun with 250 bullets. I can’t say how many.”

These and other testimonies appear in an impressive documentation project of the director Alon Schwarz. His documentary film “Tantura,” which will be screened twice this weekend online as part of the Sundance Film festival in Utah, would seem to undo the version that took root following the libel suit and Katz’s apology. Even though the testimonies of the soldiers in the film (some of them recorded by Katz, some by Schwarz) were given in broken sentences, in fragments of confessions, the overall picture is clear: Soldiers in the Alexandroni Brigade massacred unarmed men after the battle had concluded.
In fact, the testimony Katz collected was not presented to the court during the libel trial, which was settled midway through the proceedings. Listening to those recordings suggests that if the court had probed them at the time, Katz would not have been impelled to apologize. Often what the soldiers told him was only hinted at and partial, but together it added up to an unequivocal truth.

“What do you want?” asked Shlomo Ambar, who would rise to the rank of brigadier general and head of Civil Defense, the forerunner of today’s Home Front Command. “For me to be a delicate soul and speak in poetry? I moved aside. That’s all. Enough.” Ambar, speaking in the film, made it clear that the events in the village had not been to his liking, “but because I didn’t speak out then, there is no reason for me to talk about it today.”

One of the grimmest testimonies in Schwarz’s film is that of Amitzur Cohen, who talked about his first months as a combat soldier in the war: “I was a murderer. I didn’t take prisoners.” Cohen relates that if a squad of Arab soldiers was standing with their hands raised, he would shoot them all. How many Arabs did he kill outside the framework of the battles? “I didn’t count. I had a machine gun with 250 bullets. I can’t say how many.”
The Alexandroni Brigade soldiers’ testimonies join past written testimony provided by Yosef Ben-Eliezer. “I was one of the soldiers involved in the conquest of Tantura,” Ben-Eliezer wrote, some two decades ago. “I was aware of the murder in the village. Some of the soldiers did the killing at their own independent initiative.”
The testimonies and documents that Schwarz collected for his film indicate that after the massacre the victims were buried in a mass grave, which is now under the Dor Beach parking lot. The grave was dug especially for this purpose, and the burial went on for more than a week. At the end of May 1948, a week after the village was conquered, and two weeks after the declaration of statehood, one of the commanders who was posted at the site was reprimanded for not having dealt properly with the burial of the Arabs’ bodies. On June 9, the commander of the adjacent base reported: “Yesterday I checked the mass grave in Tantura cemetery. Found everything in order.”
In addition to the testimonies and documents, the film presents the conclusion of experts who compared aerial photographs of the village from before and after its conquest. A comparison of the photographs, and the use of three-dimensional imaging done with new tools, makes it possible not only to determine the exact location of the grave but also to estimate its dimensions: 35 meters long, 4 meters wide. “They took care to hide it,” Katz says in the film, “in such a way that the coming generations would walk there without knowing what they were stepping on.”

Disqualified
The confession of the Alexandroni Brigade troops casts a new light on the dismal attempt to silence Teddy Katz. In March 1998, while a graduate student at the University of Haifa, Katz submitted a master’s thesis to the department of Middle Eastern history. Its title: “The Exodus of the Arabs from the Villages at the Foot of Southern Mount Carmel in 1948.” Katz, then in his fifties, received a grade of 97. According to custom, the paper was deposited in the university’s library, and the author intended to proceed to doctoral studies. But his plan went awry.

“They took care to hide it,” Katz says in the film, “in such a way that the coming generations would walk there without knowing what they were stepping on.”

In January 2000, journalist Amir Gilat borrowed the study from the library and published an article about the massacre in Maariv. It touched off a firestorm. Besides the libel suit initiated by the Alexandroni veterans association, the university also went into a tizzy, and decided to set up a committee to reexamine the M.A. thesis. Even though the original reviewers found that Katz had completed the thesis with excellence, and even though the paper was based on dozens of documented testimonies – of Jewish soldiers and Arab refugees from Tantura – the new committee decided to disqualify the thesis.
Katz’s paper is not fault-free, but probably the primary target of criticism is the University of Haifa, which accompanied the research and the writing in a deficient manner, and after approving it then reversed course and disowned its student. That made possible the years-long silencing and repression of the bloody events in Tantura. For Katz, one court hearing was all it took for him to sign a letter of apology in which he declared that there had not been a massacre in the village and that his thesis was flawed. The fact that just hours later he retracted this, and that his lawyer, Avigdor Feldman, was not present at the nighttime meeting in which Katz came under pressure to recant, was forgotten. The apology buried the findings the thesis had uncovered, and the details of the massacre were thereafter not subjected to comprehensive scrutiny.
The historians who addressed the episode – from Yoav Gelber to Benny Morris and Ilan Pappé – reached different and contradictory conclusions. Gelber, who played a key role in the struggle to discredit Katz’s paper, asserted that a few dozen Arabs had been killed in the battle itself, but that a massacre had not occurred. Morris, for his part, thought that it was impossible to determine unequivocally what happened, but wrote that after reading several of the testimonies and interviewing some of the Alexandroni veterans, he “came away with a deep sense of unease.” Pappé, who engaged in a highly publicized debate with Gelber over Katz’s thesis, determined that a massacre had been perpetrated in Tantura in the straightforward sense of the word. Now, with the appearance of the testimony in Schwarz’s film, the debate would seem to be decided.
In one of the more dramatic scenes in the documentary, Drora Pilpel, who was the judge in the libel suit against Katz, listens to a recording of one of Katz’s interviews. It was the first time she had encountered the testimony collected by Katz, whose speedy apology brought the trial to a quick end. “If it’s true, it’s a pity,” the retired judge tells the director after removing her headphones. “If he had things like this, he should have gone all the way to the end.”
The Tantura affair exemplifies the difficulty that soldiers in the 1948 war had in acknowledging the bad behavior that was on display in that war: acts of murder, violence against Arab residents, expulsion and looting. To listen to the soldiers’ testimony today, while considering the uniform stand they demonstrated when they sued Katz, is to grasp the potency of the conspiracy of silence and the consensus that there are things one doesn’t talk about. It’s to be hoped that from the perspective of years, such subjects will be more readily addressed. A possibly encouraging sign in this direction is the fact that the film about Tantura received funding from such mainstream bodies as the Hot cable network and the Israel Film Fund.
The grim events at Tantura will never be completely investigated, the full truth will not be known. However, there is one thing that can be asserted with a great deal of certainty: Under the parking lot of one of the most familiar and beloved Israeli resort sites on the Mediterranean, lie the remains of the victims of one of the glaring massacres of the War of Independence.
Adam Raz is a researcher at the Akevot Institute for Israeli-Palestinian Conflict Research. The Akevot Institute assisted the filmmaker (without remuneration).
======================================================

https://forward.com/culture/481231/tantura-documentary-alon-schwarz-israel-palestine-war-of-independence/

Why some Israelis are finally confronting what happened in 1948 in a village called Tantura
Joshua Flanders
January 22, 2022

One week after the establishment of the State of Israel in 1948, (and three days before the Israeli Defense Forces were created), a large-scale massacre of more than 200 Arabs allegedly occurred in the Palestinian village of Tantura. This event was one incident in wars from 1947-1949, a period that Israeli Jews call the War of Independence. Palestinians use another term: Al Nakba, or the Catastrophe.

The details of what occurred at Tantura have long been disputed, with some Israeli Jews claiming nothing happened and most reluctant to even talk about it. By not acknowledging the massacre at Tantura, the government has committed to not addressing this issue.

A new documentary by an Israeli director that had its world premiere Jan. 20, the opening night of the Sundance Film Festival, explores what happened. The film by Alon Schwarz – called, simply, “Tantura” — also examines why the Nakba is taboo to discuss in Israel and what happened when one person questioned the details of this event.

Schwarz stumbled upon the story of Teddy Katz, who in the late 1990s had conducted extensive research into Tantura, compiling 140 hours of audio interviews with dozens of Jewish and Arab witnesses to the battles. Based on these oral testimonies, he wrote a master’s thesis at the University of Haifa that argued that the IDF’s Alexandroni Brigade carried out this atrocity.

Though initially well-received by the university when it was submitted around 1998, when his paper went public on Jan. 21, 2000, in the Israeli newspaper Maariv, Alexandroni veterans sued Katz for libel. His thesis was later rejected by the university and his reputation was ruined – Katz also suffered a stroke just weeks before his first meeting in court. The legal case questioned the accuracy of the oral testimonies upon which his assertions were founded. Katz, still alive though in poor health, claims he was coerced to write an apology, which he says is his greatest regret. He recanted almost immediately.

But the audio testimonies remain.

“It’s a cinematic rollercoaster,” said his brother, Shaul Schwarz, who produced the film, “hearing these tapes and having these people sit in front of the camera in the last years of their lives and need to puke out this truth or deny their truth.”The film relies heavily on these interviews, conducted in Hebrew, though Schwarz also interviewed several former soldiers, many in their 90s, as well as professors, kibbutzniks, a judge from the case, and Arabs about their recollections. He not only listened to hours of audio interviews from decades ago, he incorporated forensic evidence as well as geographic photos and analysis.

He was referring to the interviews in “Tantura” of elderly former soldiers who unburden themselves by relating acts of war they witnessed or, chillingly, committed themselves. Others said they do not remember the events in Tantura or refuse to speak about them. “We all have these inner secrets,” Shaul Schwarz said, “we all have dark sides we deal with as countries. Do you choose to be truthful or do you choose to bury your secret?”

The events described in “Tantura” came on the heels of the Holocaust, when many Jews were deeply traumatized, fearful, full of anger and panic. It may be difficult for civilians to imagine being a young soldier heading into battle and dealing with such terrifying events. While most ex-soldiers were ready to candidly share their recollections, a few were still firmly committed to taking their secrets to the grave. Some veterans recalled one or two individuals whose actions clearly crossed the line into something more monstrous.

Alon Schwarz says he has compassion for the soldiers of the Alexandroni Brigade. “I think we’re truly not judgmental,” Schwarz says, “the only thing we are judgmental about is telling the wrong story for so long.” But looking back on the events of 1948, Alon admits, “I don’t know that I would have done anything different if I lived in that period.”

Schwarz describes growing up like many Jews did, learning about the founding of the State of Israel as “a land without a people” when the Jewish pioneers arrived, a pure nation with the most moral army in the world. “I love Israel,” he says, “I’m a proud Israeli and Zionist, but like many countries we’re founded on blood. We took another people and threw them out, and in this day and age we need to say it. There needs to be some acknowledgment that the founding myth isn’t what we were told.”

Shaul Schwarz admits that after making “Tantura” something changed for him. Now when he is walking around Israel he asks himself, “I wonder who lived in that house, or I ask friends ‘do you know who lived here?’”Schwarz’s hope is to “create knowledge and understanding within Israel, first and foremost about our own history, a history most of us don’t know about. It’s uncomfortable, so people don’t talk about it, but institutionally Israel has not been very open about releasing archives. We have to say ‘this is where we were wrong, and we acknowledge and we apologize, and we want to go forward to a better place.’”

“I was depressed for a very long time,” says Alon Schwarz about the period after making the film. “It shook my whole world as it shakes Israelis’ world when they watch it. I drive around Israel and I see all these ruined houses on the side roads and suddenly it’s like, ‘OK, this was a village.’”

“American Jews often feel that they have to be 100 percent supportive of the Israeli government in order to be considered a good Zionist,” he says, “For me, loving Israel means aspiring to have a better country, a better democracy and a more open country. It means being independent thinkers. It’s good we acknowledge that we have a diverse population that includes non-Jews that are equal citizens, that they have rights and are part of our country.”

Schwarz believes that peace between Israelis and Palestinians is possible – and that talking about the “Nakba” can help. “Tantura is their tragedy,” he said, referring to the Palestinians. “It’s not comparable to the numbers of the Holocaust, but it is comparable for the personal trauma that these people went through. It’s a multi-generational trauma.

“We showed the film to a couple of Palestinians and they said it’s an eye-opening document because it’s finally some acknowledgement. That’s why we focused the film on Israelis and why we’re proud that Israelis put out this message. It’s important that it comes from us.”

“It’s pretty obvious that things happen that we are not proud of as a nation,” he says, “the best way to go forward is to expose the wrongdoings.”

====================================================================
https://www.facebook.com/754134248/posts/10158424835019249/

YoaV Gelber

22 January at 23:01הגרסה הערבית לאירועי טנטורה מול אגדות טדי כץ, אילן פפה, אדם רז ואחרים על 200 ויותר הרוגים בני בלי שם שנטבחו בכפר ונקברו מתחת למגרש החניה של דור:יחיא מחמוד אל-יחיא, אל-טנטורה: קריה דמרהא אל-אחתלאל אל-צהיוני, דמשק: דאר אל-שג’רה ללנשר ואל-תוזיע, 1998עמ’ 119-123מספר ימים לאחר שנכבש כפר לאם הגיע תורה של טנטורה. היהודים תקפו אותה לעת ערב אך צעירי הכפר הגנו עליו בכל הכוח ואילצו את הפושטים התוקפים לסגת לאחר שהותירו מאחורם הרוגים ופצועים רבים שנפלו בשדות החיטה ממזרח לכפר, אך הדבר לא מצא חן בעיני היהודים אלא העלה את חמתם והם חזרו לכפר ביום שלמחרת והפעם מכיוונים שונים ואפילו מן הים והתרכזו בחוף בסמוך לבתי הכפר בשעת בוקר מוקדמת והחלו בהתקפה עזה. מצבם של תושבי טנטורה בזמן המסוכן הזה היה כמצבו של המפקד הערבי המפורסם טארק בן זיאד ביום בו פשט על ספרד ושרף את הספינות שהובילו את כוחותיו ליבשת הספרדית ואז אמר להם “הים מאחריכם והאויב לפניכם ובאלוהים אין לכם אלא הצדק והסבלנות”.צעירי הכפר הגנו על כפרם, על בתיהם ועל אדמתם עד הכדור האחרון, אחר כך חדלו ולאחר מכן נכנסו היהודים לכפר ובמוחם הנקמה במקום כבוד לאותם אנשים אשר הגנו על כפרם היפה ועל בתיהם ואדמתם ופתחו באש על כל מי שמבטם נפל עליו והרגו בצורה שפלה גם נשים. אחר כך הרגו כדי למלא פקודה בכפר ואפילו אותם גברים אשר העסיקו אותם באיסוף הגופות ברחובות הכפר וזאת לעיני נשותיהם וילדיהם ואמהותיהם שאספו אותן ליד בור שחפרו אותו בקצה הצפוני כדי שתראינה במו עיניהן. בעת כניסתם של החיילים היהודים לטנטורה נפלו 52 חללים מתושבי טנטורה ושמותיהם ברשימת חללי טנטורה והיו גם שבעה פצועים ולהלן מה שאירע לשאר תושבי טנטורה:היהודים לקחו עמם כאסירים את הזקנים ואת הצעירים שנותרו בחיים למחנה מעצר בכפר ג’ליל ואת הנשים, הילדים והזקנות לקחו לכפר פרידיס הנמצא בקרבת מקום ולאחר ששהו שם כמה ימים, עברו לטול כרם ואחר כך לשכם ואחר כך לסוריה.כאן אין מנוס בידי אלא לחזור לעניין כניסת הכוחות היהודים שנקראו “ההגנה” ולומר כי הם הוכיחו שאינם כוחות הגנה אלא כוחות תקיפה פראיים שאיש לא מתנהג כמוהם אלא רק מי שהוא חסר מצפון ואופי ואנושיות ושאינו נוהג על פי חוקי המלחמה. האם יש חוק שמתיר לחייל להרוג אנשים ברחובות לאחר שנכנעו ולאחר שרובי הצעירים הפכו למקלות לאחר שאזלה התחמושת?והרי לפניכם כמה דוגמאות לברבריות הזו:1. אותם חיילים הורו לחמישה צעירים מהכפר לאסוף את הגופות מרחובות הכפר כפי שהיה קודם במקרה אחר והובילו אותן במשאיות לבור שהזכרנו אותו ולאחר שהסתיים איסוף הגופות הועמדו על שפת הבור ופניהם אל גופות החללים ואחר כך הגיע אחד מקציני ההגנה וירה בגבם מאחור והם נפלו לתוך הבור על גופות חבריהם.2. אישה נורתה מכדור בוגדני ותינוק יונק בידיה וכאשר נפלה על הקרקע נפל תינוקה לידה כשהוא בוכה והתקרב לגופת אמו כשהוא מחפש שד כדי לינוק והתרחק ממנה כי הייתה חסרת חיים.3. אם לשלושה בנים שאחד מהם נהרג מכדור בוגדני כאשר נכנסו הכוחות היהודיים לכפר והאח השני היה אחד מהחמישה אשר הוטל עליהם לאסוף את הגופות מרחובות הכפר וכאשר ראה את אחיו נופל חלל גחן מעליו ואחז בו כשהוא מנשק אותו והחיילים שליוו את מבצע איסוף החללים ירו בו והוא נפל מעל אחיו ומת. ואילו האח השלישי היה בקרבת אמו שישבה בין הנשים ליד בור החללים ובא אחד מאנשי ההגנה צמאי הדם ורצה להרוג שניים או שלושה מהצעירים שישבו ליד הבור והקצין האחראי במקום התנגד ומאחר עמד על דעתו, אמר לו קח לך רק אחד מאלה ובחירתו נפלה במקרה על הבן השלישי של האישה ההיא והוא גרר אותו למרחק כמה מטרים וירה בו לעיני אמו המסכנה והרג אותו.4. החיילים היהודים גילו היישר ממזרח לכפר שני אנשים שלווים מתושבי הכפר ולא היה להם נשק. הם דרשו מהם לעמוד מול סלע גבוה מתוך כוונה לירות בהם מאחור כמנהגם. לפתע הופיע אחד מיהודי זמארין (זיכרון יעקב) שהתלוו לפעולה המטורפת הזו, שהכיר את אחד מהשניים והוא יחיא בן מחמד חצ’ר אל-מאצ’י מתושבי הכפר והיה לו מליץ יושר ודיבר עליו טובות על תכונותיו האנושיות במשך חייו וריחמו עליו אך ירו למוות בחברו והוא המנוח מצטפא אבו ג’אמוס.5. אישה זקנה שיצאה מביתה נשענת על מקל נורתה למוות בידי החיילים ללא כל סיבה.6. אחד מתושבי טנטורה ששמו שיח’ סלימאן אל-רשיד אל-חסין אל-יחיא סבל מתשישות במוחו לאחר שלמד כמה שנים באוניברסיטת אל-אזהר במצרים וקיבל תעודת מוסמך בלימודי האיסלאם ובא האיש הזה מחיפה לטנטורה ביום השני לכיבוש הכפר ולא ידע שהחיילים היהודים נכנסו לכפר וכאשר הגיע לגורן של הכפר ללא התראה ירה עליו חייל להודי ונפל הרוג לתעלת מי הגשם ליד הגורן ונותר יושב על ברכו ונותר כמו שאומרים יומיים תמימים עד שקברו אותו באותה תעלת מים. מה אירע עם אסירי טנטורה לאחר שנלקחו למחנה המעצר ג’ליל? הם סבלו סבל רב במחנה הזה במשך שמונה חודשים ואחר כך הוחלפו בשבויים יהודים שנשבו בידי צבאות ערביים ושבויי טנטורה הועברו לטול כרם ואחר כך יצאו עם משפחותיהם לסוריה או שנותרו באזור. כמה מנכבדי טנטורה וזקניה נפלו בדרך לסוריה או מיד לאחר שהגיעו אליה ומתו כמו:1. אל-חאג’ מחמוד אבו הנאא2. מוסא אבראהים עבד אל-עאל3. אבראהים אל-מצרי4. סעד אל-טנג’י5. פאיז אל-איוב אל-אעמר6. מחמד אל-מצטפא7. אעמר אבו מאצ’י8. אבראהים אל-צבאע’9. מחמד אל-צאדק אל-מאצ’י10. טה אל-שיח’ מחמוד סלאםוזאת בשל המצוקה הנפשית והיגון העמוק והסבל ובעיקר בגלל אובדן המולדת והאדמה והבית ואחר כך אובדן החללים בכפר לעיניהם. כאן אין אלא לציין שהנשים לא ניצלו מזוועות החיילים היהודים בעת שחיפשו עליהן לפני שהוציאו אותן מטנטורה והעבירו אותן לפרידיס. התנהגו כלפיהן בצורה נתעבת ונפשעת ולקחו מהן כל מה שהיה כמו תכשיטים וכסף וכאשר הגיעו הנשים הללו עם ילדיהן לסוריה הן היו חסרות כל. עמ’ 143שמות החללים שנפלו בקרב טנטורה1. קאסם דקנאש2. מחמד מחמוד קאסם אאל חמדאן3. ח’ליל מחמוד קאסם אאל חמדאן4. מחמד אחמד קאסם אאל חמדאן5. עיסא בן חמדאן קאסם6. תופיק בן עיסא חמדאן קאסם7. רפיק בן עיסא חמדאן קאסם8. מוסא חמדאן קאסם קאסם9. מחמד אמין חמדאן קאסם קאסם10. אחמד סלימאן אל-סלבוד11. ח’ליל סלימאן אל-סלבוד12. מצטפא סלימאן אל-סלבוד13. ג’ודת רג’ב אל-סמרה14. תופיק חסן את-הנדי15. מחמד אל-איוב (אבו זיד)16. מחמד אחסאן אל-אעמר17. סלמאן אל-אטרש18. עיסא סלמאן אל-אטרש19. מצטפא אבו ג’אמוס20. פצ’ל מחמוד אבו הנאא21. פוזי אבו זמק22. מחמד טה מחמוד סלאם23. עבד אל-ג’באר טה סלאם24. מוסא בן עיסא סלאם25. עבד אל-ראוף אבראהים סלאם26. סוידאן אל-עשמאוי27. עטיה אל-עשמאוי28. אל-חאג’ עבד אל-רחמן אל-דסוקי29. עיסא אחמד אל-דסוקי30. סלים ח’ליל אל-דסוקי31. נמר ח’ליל אל-דסוקי32. מחמד עוץ’ אבו אדריס33. חסן אניס אבו מאצ’י34. שחאדה סעיד אל-מצלח35. עארף אבראהים אומבישי36. עבד אל-עזיז מחמוד אל-זראע37. ד’יב מחמוד אל-ח’טיב38. חסן מוסא אל-עמורי39. רשיד בן אעמר אבו מאצ’י40. אחמד סלימאן אל-מצרי41. סלימאן אל-מצרי42. מוסא עבד אל-רחים43. סלים מחמד אבו שכר44. אסעד אחמד מדירס45. חסין אל-פראן (מכפר אג’זם, היה בטנטורה דרך מקרה)46. עיסא אל-נורי (מכפר עין ע’זאל, היה בטנטורה דרך מקרה)47. סלמאן אל-פארס (מכפר פרידיס, היה בטנטורה דרך מקרה)48. מחמד חסן אל-ג’מאל49. אל-שיח’ סלימאן אל-רשיד אל-יחי50. רשיד ח’אלד (מסוריה, היה במקום במקרה)51. עזה אל-חאג’ סלימאן אל-הנדי52. שפיק דקנאששמות הפצועים בקרב טנטורה1. עיסא מחמוד סלאם2. פיצל מחמוד אבו הנאא3. אבראהים מוסא אל-שורי4. מחמד אחמד אל-בירומי5. אאמנה מחמד אבו אעמר6. סעאד אל-פלו7. רחמה אסעד אל-מרג’אן8. חפצה שהבאת (זרה, הייתה במקום במקרה)
Google Translate


YoaV Gelber

22 January at 23:01 The Arabic version of Tantura events in the face of the legends by Teddy Katz, Ilan Pepe, Adam Raz and others about the 200 or more dead unnamed who were slaughtered in the village and buried under the parking lot of Dor: Mahmoud al-Yahiya Yahya, Al-Tantura. Damascus: Dar al-Shajra to Lansher and al-Tuzia, 1998 pp. 119-123 A few days after the conquest of a village Lam, the time of Tantura has come. The Jews attacked it in the evening but the young people of the village defended it with all their might and forced the attacking invaders to retreat after leaving behind many dead and wounded who fell in the wheat fields east of the village, but the Jews did not like it as it angered them. They returned the following day from all sides and the sea and concentrated on the shore near the village houses in the early morning and began a fierce attack. The situation of the inhabitants of Tantura at this dangerous time was like that of the famous Arab commander Tarek Ben Ziad on the day he raided Spain and burned the ships that led his forces to the Spanish mainland and then told them “the sea is behind you and the enemy is before you and God has nothing but justice and patience”. The youngsters of the village defended their houses and land until the last bullet, then ceased and then the Jews entered the village and in their minds revenge instead of respect for those people who defended their beautiful village and their houses and land and opened fire on anyone whose gaze fell on him and killed in humiliating way also women. Then they killed to carry out an order in the village and even those men who they employed to collect the bodies in the village streets in front of their wives and children and mothers who collected them near a pit that dug it at the northern end for her to see with their own eyes. When the Jewish soldiers entered Tantura, 52 victims of Tantura and their names on the list of Tantura victims and there were also seven wounded. Here is what happened to the other residents of Tantura: The Jews took them as prisoners the old, the young who were alive to a prison camp in Kafar Jalil and the wmen children and elderly women to Furadis nearby and after staying there for a few days, they moved to Tulkarm and then to Nablus and then to Syria. Here I have no alternative but to go back to the point of the Jewish forces who were called Hahagana, the “defence” to say these are not defences forces but wild offensive forces that one who is unscrupulous and lack of human character and humanity and who does not act according to the laws of war. Is there a law that allows a soldier to kill people in the streets after they have surrendered and after the young rifles have become sticks after the ammunition has run out? Here are some examples of this barbarism: 1. The same soldiers ordered five young men from the village to collect the bodies from the village streets and led them in trucks to the pit we mentioned and after collecting bodies the were srtanding in front of the pit and their faces facing the corpses and then one of the officers of the Hagana shot them from the back and they fell into the pit on the corpses. 2. A woman was shot from a treacherous bullet and a breastfed baby in her arms and when she fell to the ground her baby fell beside her while he was crying and approached his mother’s body looking for a breast to suckle and walked away from her because she was lifeless. 3. A mother of three boys one of whom was killed by a treacherous bullet when Jewish forces entered the village and the second brother was one of five who was tasked with collecting the bodies from the village streets and when he saw his brother dying as he fell over him and he kissed him and the soldiers shot him above his brother nd he died. While the third brother was near his mother who was sitting among the women near the pit and one of the bloodthirsty Hagana people came and wanted to kill two or three of the young men sitting by the pit and the officer in charge objected and told him take only one of them and his choice fell on the third son of that woman and he dragged him a few feet away and shot him in front of his poor mother and killed him. 4. Directly east of the village, the Jewish soldiers discovered two peaceful people from the village that had no weapons. They demanded them to stand in front of a high rock with the intention of shooting them in the back as was their custom. Suddenly one of the Jews of Zamarin (Zichron Yaacov) who accompanied this crazy action appeared, who knew one of the two and he is Yahya bin Muhammad Khachar al-Machi from the village and he had an honest advocate and spoke well of him about his human qualities throughout his life so they spared him and shot his friend the late Mustafa Abu Jamus. 5. An old woman who came out of her house leaning on a stick was shot to death by the soldiers for no reason. 6. One of the residents of Tantura named Sheikh Suleiman al-Rashid al-Hussein al-Yahya suffered from exhaustion in his mind after studying at Al-Azhar University in Egypt for several years and received a certificate in Islamic studies and this man came from Haifa to Tantura on the second day of conquest and when he arrived without knowing the Jewish soldiers entered the village, when he entered the threshing floor of the village without warning he was shot by a Jewish soldier and fell dead into the rainwater canal near the threshing floor and was left sitting on his knee and remained as they say for two whole days until he was buried in the same water canal. What happened to Tantura prisoners after they were taken to the Jalil detention camp? They suffered greatly in this camp for eight months and then were replaced by Jewish prisoners captured by Arab armies and Tantura prisoners were transferred to Tulkarem and then went out with their families to Syria or remained in the area. Some of the dignitaries of Tantura and its elders fell on the way to Syria or immediately after reaching it and died like: 1. Al-Haj Mahmoud Abu Hana 2. Musa Ibrahim ‘Abd al-‘Al 3. Ibrahim al-Masri 4. Sa’ad al-Tanji 5. Faiz al-Ayyub al-Amer 6. Muhammad al-Mustafa 7. Amar Abu Machi 8. Ibrahim al-Tzaba’ 9. Muhammad al-Zadek al-Machi 10. Te al-Sheikh Mahmoud Salamuzat due to the mental distress and deep grief and suffering and mainly due to the loss of the homeland and the land and the house and then the loss of lives of people in the village before their eyes. Here it is only to be noted that the women did not escape the horrors of the Jewish soldiers while searching on them before they were taken out of Tantura and transferred to Furidis. They behaved in a disgusting and criminal way and took from them everything that they had like jewelry and money and when these women came with their children to Syria they were destitute. Page 143 The names of the martyrs who fell in the battle of Tantura 1. Qassem Dekanash 2. Muhammad Mahmoud Qassem al-Hamdan 3. Khalil Mahmoud Qassem al-Hamdan 4. Muhammad Ahmad Qassem al-Hamdan 5. Issa bin Hamdan Qassem 6. Tawfiq Ben Issa Hamdan Qassem 7. Rafik Ben Issa Hamdan Qassem 8. Musa Hamdan Qassem Qassem 9. Muhammad Amin Hamdan Qassem Qassem 10. Ahmad Suleiman al-Salbud 11. Khalil Suleiman al-Salbud 12. Mustafa Suleiman al-Salbud 13. Judith Rajab al-Samara 14. Tawfiq Hassan the-Handi 15. Muhammad al-Ayyub (Abu Zeid) 16. Muhammad Ahsan al-‘Amar 17. Salman al-Atrash 18. Issa Salman al-Atrash 19. Mustafa Abu Jamus 20. Patchel Mahmoud Abu Hana 21. Fuzi Abu Zamek 22. Muhammad Ta Mahmoud Salam 23. ‘Abd al-Jabbar Te Salam 24. Musa Ben Issa Salam 25. ‘Abd al-Rauf Ibrahim Salam 26. Suidan al-Ashmawi 27. Atiya al-Ashmawi 28. Al-Hajj ‘Abd al-Rahman al-Dasuki 29. Issa Ahmad al-Dasuki 30. Salim Khalil al-Dsuki 31. Khalil al-Dsuki Nimer 32. Muhammad ‘Uch Abu Edris 33. Hassan Anis Abu Machi 34. Shehadeh Said al-Matzlah 35. Araf Ibrahim Umbishi 36. ‘Abd al-‘Aziz Mahmoud al-Zara’a 37. Dib Mahmoud al-Khatib 38. Hassan Musa al-Amuri 39. Rashid bin Amar Abu Machi 40. Ahmad Suleiman al-Masri 41. Suleiman al-Masri 42. Musa ‘Abd al-Rahim 43. Salim Muhammad Abu Shachar 44. Assad Ahmad Madirs 45. Hussein al-Fran (from the village of Ajzm, was in Tantura by chance) 46. Issa al-Nuri (from the village of Ein Ghazal, was in Tantura by chance) 47. Salman al-Fares (from the village of Fridis, was in Tantura by chance) 48. Muhammad Hassan al-Jamal 49. Al-Sheikh Suleiman al-Rashid al-Yachi 50. Rashid Khaled (from Syria, was there by chance) 51. Gaza al-Hajj Suleiman al-Handi 52. Shafik Dekanash the wounded in the battle of Tantura 1. Issa Mahmoud Salam 2. Fitzel Mahmoud Abu Hana 3. Ibrahim Musa al-Shuri 4. Muhammad Ahmad al-Birumi 5. Convention Muhammad Abu Amar 6. Sa’ad al-Flu 7. Rahma Assad al-Marjan 8. Object you brought (foreign, was there by chance)

=========================================================

https://www.alexandroni.org/tantura/
עמותת אלכסנדרוני

הסיפור על טנטורה – סופה של עלילת הדם

בחודש ינואר 2000 התפרסמה בעיתון “מעריב” כתבת תחקיר שניזומה ע”י אחד, תדי כץ, המתיימר להיות היסטוריון,על טבח שנעשה, כביכול, ע”י לוחמי גדוד 33 באנשים חסרי מגן לאחר הקרב בטנטורה.

לוחמי החטיבה יצאו לקרב משפטי וציבורי לטיהור שמם ולהסרת הכתם הבלתי מוצדק שהדביק להם אותו “היסטוריון”. להלן סיכום הפרשה, שבסופה יצא הצדק לאור.

א. פתח דבר

1.
בחודש מרץ 1998 הוגשה על ידי מר תדי כץ, סטודנט לתואר שני, עבודת גמר כמילוי חלק מהדרישות לקבלת התואר מוסמך מאת החוג להיסטוריה של המזרח התיכון, הפקולטה למדעי הרוח באוניברסיטת חיפה. כותרתה של העבודה “יציאת הערבים מכפרים למרגלות הכרמל הדרומי ב1948-“.

2.
פרק ד’ של עבודת המאסטר, שהוא למעשה הפרק העיקרי בה, עוסק ב- “פרשת הכפר א-טנטורה”. הפרק מתאר את הקרב שהתנהל בכפר טנטורה ועל החולות אשר סביב לו, בלילה שבין ה – 22 ל – 23 בחודש מאי 1948.

3.
בפתיח לפרק ד’ לעבודה כותב מר כץ את הדברים הבאים:
“סה”כ חללי הקרב היהודים – 14 במספר, כולל איש הפלי”ם (פלי”ם – פלוגות ימיות – הזרוע הימית של הפלמ”ח), שנפל מאש כוחותינו. מבין אנשי טנטורה נפלו בקרב עצמו לא יותר מאשר 10 או 20 בלבד, אלא שבסופו של אותו היום היו בכפר לא פחות מ – 200 עד 250 גברים הרוגים, בנסיבות בהן היו אנשי הכפר נטולי נשק ונטולי מגן לחלוטין. אלו הן העובדות היבשות העולות מתוך העדויות, שחלקים מהן יובאו בהמשך הדברים” (עמ’ 88 לעבודה).

4.
וכך למעשה ייחס מר כץ ללוחמים ומפקדים בגדוד 33 של חטיבת אלכסנדרוני אשר נטלו חלק פעיל בקרבות בהם לחמה החטיבה במלחמת השחרור, ובכלל זאת בקרב לכיבוש הכפר “טנטורה”, פשע מלחמה נתעב של טבח המוני של מאות אנשים, בנסיבות בהן היו אלה חסרי נשק וחסרי מגן.

5.
פרסום הדברים הללו עורר בעקבותיו הדים רבים, ואף פרסומים נוספים באמצעי התקשורת השונים. בחלק ניכר מן הדיונים שנערכו בנושא השתתף מר כץ כ”אורח כבוד” והוא הודיע כי הוא ניצב איתן מאחורי הדברים שנכתבו על ידו. התגובה הציבורית להאשמות שהוטחו בלוחמי אלכסנדרוני על ידי מר כץ הייתה קשה ביותר, ובכתבה שפורסמה בעיתון מעריב, בתאריך 21.1.2000 אף מצוטט פרופ’ אסא כשר, מחבר הקוד האתי של צה”ל, כמי שמכנה את “מבצעי הטבח”, שבקיומו הוא אינו מטיל ספק, כ”פושעי מלחמה”.

6.
אכן, קרב קשה התנהל בכפר טנטורה ועל החולות אשר סביב לו, בחודש מאי 1948, כמופיע למעלה. באותו קרב איבדו לוחמי אלכסנדרוני 14 מחבריהם, ואף האויב ידע אבידות רבות. אולם עם עלות השחר נכנע הכפר ואיש לא נורה על ידי לוחמי אלכסנדרוני לאחר תום הקרב, בהיותו “נטול נשק ונטול מגן”, כהאשמתו הזדונית של מר כץ.

7.
לוחמי אלכסנדרוני, אשר נלחמו במלחמת השחרור של מדינת ישראל בהיותם בחורים צעירים, לא ידעו מנוחה לנפשם נוכח האשמות השווא אשר הוטחו בהם, והם החליטו לצאת למסע, אולי האחרון בחייהם, לטיהור שמם. המסע התנהל בשלוש חזיתות במקביל: החזית המשפטית, החזית האקדמית והחזית הציבורית. עו”ד גיורא ארדינסט ליווה ומלווה את לוחמי אלכסנדרוני בנאמנות ובדבקות במלחמתם בשלושת החזיתות.

ב. החזית המשפטית

8.
ביום 16.4.2000 הגישו שמונה מלוחמי אלכסנדרוני תביעת דיבה כנגד כץ בבית המשפט המחוזי בתל אביב (ת.א. 1686/00 בן ציון פרידן ואחרים נגד תדי כץ).

9.
לאחר שנכשלו ניסיונותיו של מר כץ להביא לסילוק התביעה על הסף ולמנוע את ברורה לגופה בטענות מטענות שונות, הוגשה על ידו הודעת צד ג’ כנגד אוניברסיטת חיפה, אשר לפי טענתו הייתה אחראית לפקח עליו ועל האופן בו נכתבה עבודתו.

10.
במסגרת התביעה התקיימו הליכי גילוי מסמכים ובמסגרתם הועברו לידי לוחמי אלכסנדרוני רוב הקלטות של הראיונות שערך מר כץ. לוחמי אלכסנדרוני טרחו ותמללו את הקלטות ואף תירגמו לעברית את אותן שיחות שהתקיימו במקור בערבית, וזאת באמצעות מתורגמנית מקצועית אשר שפת אמה ערבית.

11.
מהשוואת הקלטות עם הציטוטים המופיעים בעבודתו של כץ התגלה ללוחמי אלכסנדרוני, לתדהמתם, כי כץ סירס וסילף באופן שיטתי ומגמתי את הדברים שנאמרו לו על ידי מרואייניו וכי עבודתו “האקדמית” אינה אלא מארג צפוף של דברי סילוף וציטוטי כזב. אין מדובר “בטעויות” שנעשו בתום לב אלא, כפי שניתן להבחין על נקלה, בשיטה ממש של ציטוטי כזב שכיוונם אחד ואשר מטרתם להוכיח מסקנה שסומנה מראש.

12.
לאחר יומיים בהם נחקר מר כץ בבית המשפט על תצהירו בחקירת שתי וערב, על ידי עו”ד גיורא ארדינסט, אשר במסגרתה נחשפו ציטוטי הכזב של מר כץ בעבודתו, ונתגלו הפערים הבלתי ניתנים לגישור בין הדברים שצוטטו על ידי מר כץ לבין הדברים כפי שנאמרו לו בראיונות שערך, חתם מר כץ על מכתב התנצלות אשר זו לשונו:

“בחודש מרס 1998 הגשתי עבודת גמר אשר מהווה חלק ממילוי הדרישות לתואר מוסמך בהיסטוריה של המזרח התיכון באוניברסיטת חיפה (להלן – “עבודת הגמר”).

בפרק העבודה העוסק בכפר טנטורה, נכתב על ידי, כי התמונה הכוללת העולה מתוך העדויות היא שחיילים מחטיבת אלכסנדרוני עסקו עוד במשך שעות אחדות לאחר סיום הקרב במצוד קטלני אחר גברים בוגרים על מנת להרגם, כאשר בסופו של היום היו בכפר לא פחות מ – 250-200 גברים הרוגים בנסיבות בהן היו אנשי הכפר נטולי נשק ונטולי מגן לחלוטין.

ברצוני להבהיר כי לאחר ששבתי ובדקתי את הדברים ברור לי מעל לכל ספק כי אין כל יסוד לטענה כי בוצע בטנטורה הרג של אנשים, לאחר כניעת הכפר, על ידי לוחמי חטיבת אלכסנדרוני, או על ידי כוח אחר של הישוב העברי.

אני מבקש להבהיר כי גם הדברים שנכתבו על ידי הובנו ככל הנראה שלא כראוי, שכן לא התכוונתי לומר שהיה טבח בטנטורה וגם כיום אני אומר שלא היה טבח בטנטורה.

הנני מאמין לאנשי אלכסנדרוני אשר הכחישו את דבר הטבח מכל וכל, ואני חוזר בי מכל מסקנה משתמעת מהעבודה בדבר התרחשותו של הטבח או בדבר הרג של אנשים חסרי נשק וחסרי מגן.

לאור האמור לעיל, הנני מוצא לנכון להביע התנצלותי הכנה בפני לוחמי החטיבה, בפני משפחותיהם ובפני משפחות חללי החטיבה בכך שניתלו בהם האשמות שווא מסוג זה.

הודעתי זו תפורסם בעיתונות בגודל ובמיקום הולם”.

13.
במסגרת הסכם הפשרה אשר נחתם בין הצדדים (ואשר מר כץ ניסה לחזור בו ממנו יום לאחר שנחתם), התחייב מר כץ לפרסם את מכתב ההתנצלות בגודל חצי עמוד בשני עיתונים יומיים. להסכם הפשרה ניתן תוקף של פסק דין לאחר שבית המשפט דחה את כל טענותיו של מר כץ כאילו ההסכם נחתם על ידו ברגע של “חולשת דעת”. למותר לציין כי מכתב ההתנצלות עליו חתם מר כץ נוסח בעצה אחת עם עורך דינו, עו”ד אמציה אטלס, אשר נכח בפגישה בה נחתמו מכתב ההתנצלות והסכם הפשרה.

14.
להשלמת התמונה יצויין כי ביום 17.1.2001 הגיש מר כץ ערעור על פסק דינו של בית המשפט המחוזי ועל החלטתו שלא לבטלו (ע”א 456/01). בתאריך 6.11.2001 התקיים דיון בבית המשפט העליון בערעור בפני הרכב של שלושה שופטים: השופט מצא והשופטות שטרסברג כהן ונאור. בית המשפט העליון דחה את ערעורו של הנתבע, לא אפשר לו לחזור בו מן ההתחייבות לפרסם את התנצלותו וחייב אותו בהוצאות.

ג. החזית האקדמית

15.
עבודת המאסטר של מר כץ נעשתה בהנחייתו של פרופ’ קייס פירו ובסיועו של ד”ר אילן פפה, מי שביודעין נתן יד ל”תיזה” השקרית של כץ, ואף ממשיך להפיץ כזבים ודברי הבל מעל כל במה אפשרית שנקלעת לדרכו.

16.
בעקבות הדברים החמורים שנתבררו במהלך חקירתו הנגדית של מר כץ, נשלח מטעם לוחמי אלכסנדרוני בתאריך 26.12.2000 מכתב תלונה לרקטור אוניברסיטת חיפה, פרופ’ אהרון בן זאב, ולראשי גופים רלוונטיים אחרים באוניברסיטת חיפה, ובו פורטו כזביו וסילופיו של כץ בעבודת התיזה שלו, כפי שנחשפו בבית המשפט.

17.
בעקבות הממצאים החמורים שנחשפו, כפי שפורטו במכתב כאמור, הוקמו על ידי רקטור אוניברסיטת חיפה שתי ועדות: האחת, לבדיקת אי ההתאמות בין הדברים שנאמרו לכץ על ידי מרואייניו, כפי שהם מופיעים בקלטות הראיונות, לבין הציטוטים השזורים בעבודתו, והאחרת, לבדיקת נוהלי הענקת תארים מתקדמים (M.A. ודוקטורט) באוניברסיטת חיפה בכלל, ובמקרהו של מר כץ בפרט.

18.
הוועדה לבדיקת עבודתו של כץ, אשר חבריה היו פרופ’ אמציה ברעם, ראש המרכז היהודי-ערבי, פרופ’ רפי טלמון, ראש החוג לערבית, ד”ר איברהים ג’רייס, מהחוג לערבית ופרופ’ יוסף נבו, מהחוג להיסטוריה של המזרח התיכון, מצאה כי קיים פער בין הקלטות והרשימות לבין טקסט העבודה.

ביום 10.6.2001 הוגש דו”ח הוועדה לרקטור אוניברסיטת חיפה אשר בה פורטו הפערים האמורים על פי שלוש דרגות חומרה.

כך למשל, נמצאו 14 מקרים בהם היו פערים בדרגת חומרה גבוהה, בהם נמסרו בציטוטים אלמנטים שאין להם זכר בהקלטות או ברשימות שכתב כץ. הוועדה ציינה כי “תמונת המצב הכללית המתקבלת מסיכום כלל הפערים היא בהחלט בלתי מחמיאה”, וכן כי “העבודה כשלה בשלב העמדת החומר הגולמי לשיפוט הקורא, הן באירגונו על פי קריטריונים מחמירים של מיון וביקורת, והן במה שנראה כמקרים של אי כיבוד עדויות המרואיינים”.

19.
לאור חומרת הממצאים, הועבר הדו”ח לרשות ללימודים מתקדמים, שהינה הגוף האחראי באוניברסיטת חיפה על עבודות המ.א. והדוקטורט. ביום 20.11.2001 פרסמה המועצה ללימודים מתקדמים החלטה, לפיה עבודת הגמר אינה יכולה להתקבל במתכונתה הנוכחית.

האוניברסיטה החליטה לדחות את אישור עבודת הגמר ואת הציון שקיבל כץ למשך שישה חודשים, בהם יצטרך כץ לתקן את עבודתו, והודיעה כי אם לא יעשה כן, תתבטל ההכרה בעבודה באופן סופי. בנוסף לכך הורה רקטור האוניברסיטה להסיר את העבודה ממדפי האוניברסיטה, וביקש גם מספריות אוניברסיטאות אחרות, לנהוג באופן דומה.

20.
תוצאות מאבקם של לוחמי אלכסנדרוני בחזית האקדמית מלמדות, כי מר כץ איננו “היסטוריון חדש” ואיננו “היסטוריון ישן”, אלא כזבן שיטתי אשר הוליך שולל את המוסד האקדמי, אשר העניק לו את חסותו והעניק לעבודתו את הלגיטימציה לה היתה זקוקה, כפי שהוא הוליך שולל רבים אחרים.

ד. החזית הציבורית

21.
סקירה התקשורתית הנרחבת לה זכתה פרשת טנטורה במהלך השנתיים האחרונות העלתה אותה לסדר היום הציבורי. משכך, תכליתה של החזית הציבורית הינה להסיר את הכתם שהדביקו מר כץ ותומכיו בלוחמי אלכסנדרוני. לפיכך, מלבד ההליכים המשפטיים והאקדמיים המנוהלים כנגד כץ, לוחמי אלכסנדרוני פעלו וממשיכים לפעול כנגד תומכיה הנלהבים בתיזה “החדשנית” והמופרכת של כץ.

22.
ד”ר אילן פפה, היסטוריון אנטי ציוני, מי שסייע בהכנת עבודת המאסטר, עמד ועומד עדיין מאחורי כץ והוא מושך בחוטיה של המריונטה כפי רצונו. כל הפניות שהופנו לד”ר פפה נתקלו במתקפה של דברי שקר ואיומים, אשר אין בהם ולא כלום. סגנונו הבוטה וגס הרוח של ד”ר פפה, הכולל דברי בלע, השמצות, גידופים ותוקפנות ואלימות מילולית, מעורר אף את זעמם של חבריו לסגל האקדמי. לאחרונה אף נשמעה תביעה להעמידו לדין משמעתי על התנהגותו חסרת הכבוד המהווה הפרה בוטה של כללי האתיקה במוסד אקדמי.

23.
על מנת להבין מיהו אילן פפה, נזכיר כי ד”ר פפה הפיץ לאחרונה באינטרנט מאמר (שנכתב על ידי “מאורות” אחרים), ולפיו המוסד וה – CIA עומדים מאחורי הפיגוע בבניין התאומים בניו יורק ביום 11.9.2001.

24.
לוחמי אלכסנדרוני פנו גם לפרופ’ אסא כשר, מחבר הקוד האתי של צה”ל אשר האשים אותם בביצוע פשע מלחמה, בדרישה כי יתנצל בפניהם על הדברים הנלוזים שצוטטו מפיו בקשר עם ממצאי מחקרו “האקדמי” של תדי כץ ולחזור בו מאמירותיו.

נכון להיום, פרופ’ אסא כשר אף לא טרח להגיב לפנייתם, ובכך הוכיח כי האתיקה היא ממנו והלאה, וכי הוא ממהר ליישר קו עם “שורת המקהלה” גם כאשר היא שרה שירי כזב.

25.
בתאריך 20 בינואר 2003, הפרופ’ אסא כשר, שבתחילת הפרשה קבע כי “בטנטורה בוצע פשע מלחמה”, חזר בו מהאשמותיו, ובמכתב ששלח ללוחמי החטיבה אמר כי הוטעה לחשוב כך מקריאת העבודה הראשונה. לאחר קריאת החומר הרב שהצטבר הנושא, במהלך המאבק אותו ניהלו לוחמי החטיבה, הגיע למסקנה כי העובדות שתוארו בעבודה אינן נכונות, והביע את התנצלותו בפני לוחמי החטיבה על עוגמת הנפש שגרמו דבריו לותיקי החטיבה.

26.
ההיסטוריון מאיר פעיל, אשר מלכתחילה היה מבין תומכיה הנלהבים של “התיזה” החדשנית של תדי כץ, חזר בו ביום 7.3.02 מהאשמותיו כלפי לוחמי אלכסנדרוני, לאחר ששב וקרא את החומר המלא שנמסר לידיו על ידם. וכך נכתבו הדברים על ידו:

“כדי להסיר ספק בדבר דעתי המסכמת על מחקרו של תדי כץ בפרשת כיבוש טנטורה במלחמת העצמאות, אני רואה חובה מוסרית, מדעית וחברית להודיעכם כי, לאחר עיון נוסף ובחינה מחודשת […] ולאחר שקראתי בקפידה את החלטת המועצה ללימודים מתקדמים של אוניברסיטת חיפה, הגעתי למסקנה, כי אין, ולא היה כל צידוק בהטלת שום דופי מוסרי על לוחמי גדוד 33 של חטיבת “אלכסנדרוני”, אשר כבשו את טנטורה ב – 24 בחודש מאי 1948″.

כבר הצהרתי בפומבי כי אין להסתמך על ממצאי עבודת המחקר הנ”ל של תדי כץ; ואני מקווה כי תדי כץ יישר את ההדורים במחקרו המחודש”.

ה. סוף דבר

27.
לוחמי אלכסנדרוני נחלו הצלחה בחזית המשפטית, בחזית האקדמית ובחזית הציבורית. הציבור הרחב יודע עתה כי טבח בטנטורה לא היה ולא נברא וכי נשקם של לוחמי אלכסנדרוני היה טהור. לא רק לוחמי אלכסנדרוני נצחו בקרב על מורשת טנטורה – האמת ניצחה.

28.
בתאריך 10 באפריל 2003 התכנסה המועצה ללימודים מתקדמים של אוניברסיטת חיפה, ופסלה את עבודת “המחקר” המתוקנת של תדי כץ. כן קבעה המועצה כי תדי כץ לא יוכל לקבל תואר מוסמך במסלול מחקרי.

העבודה, שהוכנה לאחר שהאוניברסיטה החליטה להסיר ממדפיה את העבודה הקודמת, ואיפשרה למר תדי כץ להגיש עבודה מתוקנת, הוגשה לחמישה שופטים שונים. שניים מהשופטים פסלו לחלוטין את העבודה, והשלושה הנוספים קיבלוה, אך צירפו הערות ביקורתיות ומחמירות ביותר. כל חמשת השופטים הצביעו על “פגמים מחקריים מהותיים” הקשורים למתודולוגיה המחקרית ולרמת הניתוח.

“הביקורת הקשה לא איפשרה למועצה ללימודים מתקדמים לאשר את עבודת המחקר המתוקנת ולזכות את כץ בתואר מוסמך”, אמר רקטור האוניברסיטה פרופ’ אהרון בן-זאב.

29.
הסערה שעוררה עלילת הדם של תדי כ”ץ בעולם האקדמי, הביאה את פרופ’ דני צנזור מאוניברסיטת בן-גוריון בנגב להקים אתר, בו רוכזו כל המסמכים ממשפט הדיבה שניהל תדי כ”ץ מול לוחמי החטיבה. אל האתר ניתן להגיע מהדף באנציקלופדיה הפתוחה (ויקיפדיה), כאן.

מבצע נמל – פתיחת הכביש לחיפה

עם שחרור חיפה, יציאת ערביי קיסריה וניתוק הכפרים הערביים השוכנים לאורך כביש זיכרון יעקב, לא נותר לאויב אלא בסיס אחד בכפרים אלה. בסיס אחד, כדי לקיים את הקשר החיצוני, היה בדרך הים והוא הכפר טנטורה ששכן לחוף הים, צפונית – מערבית לזיכרון יעקב.

לא ייפלא, אפוא, שעד מהרה הפך הכפר לבסיס הספקה ראשי לכל כפרי הסביבה. צי של עשרות סירות וספינות קטנות קיים קשר קבוע עם לבנון והשיט לטנטורה אספקה, נשק וציוד והוציא עימו ללבנון פליטים בורחים.

כתוצאה מהספקה זו, גברה הטרדת התחבורה היהודית בכביש תל אביב – חיפה על ידי כפרי “המשולש הקטן”, עד כדי חסימת הכביש לחלוטין בידי הפורעים . חשיבות טנטורה היתה ביכולתה לשמר את תנופת ההטרדות הערביות על התחבורה היהודית בין תל אביב לחיפה. מיקום בסיס אויב זה בתוך שטחנו, היה חמור משניתן היה להשלים עמו.

ניסיונות המשא ומתן עם הכפריים על כניעה, מו”ם שנוהל על ידי אחד מאנשי ההגנה בזיכרון יעקב, שהיה בקשרים קרובים עם נכבדי הכפר בטרם פרוץ המלחמה.

המשא ומתן נכשל בגלל התנגדות צעירי הכפר והזרים שהיו בו, שלא כפי שקרה בפוריידיס וג’יסר–א-זרקא, שבהם הסכימו התושבים להיכנע.

לאור כשלון המו”ם, הוחלט לכבוש הכפר ולטהר את חוף הים מכוחות האויב.

לפי המודיעין שהיה בידי כוחותינו, היו בכפר כ- 300 לוחמים, מצוידים ב- 100 רובים לערך, כמה עשרות אקדחים ותתי-מקלע, מספר מרגמות “3 ותותח בופורס 40 מילימטר (לידיעה זו לא היה אישור ברור). בראש הלוחמים היו כנראה ארבעה אנגלים, עריקי הצבא הבריטי, ערבים עריקי המשטרה ומספר לוחמים מוסלמים בוסניים.

המשימה הוטלה על גדוד 33 בחטיבת אלכסנדרוני. נערך סיור מוקדם של המפקדים, באמצעות מסע ברכבת מחדרה לעתלית. הרכבת עדיין פעלה בחסות הבריטים שהחזיקו בשטח נמל חיפה. לבקשת מפקד הסיור, האטה הרכבת ליד טנטורה כדי לקבל מושג רחב יותר, בעצירת הרכבת בתחנת זיכרון יעקב, תקף אותה מטוס מצרי שהחטיאה. בדיעבד הסתבר שהמודיעין היה מדויק למדי.

לאור המודיעין והסיור, הוחלט על דרך הפעולה:
התקפה בשני צירים עיקריים – פלוגה א’ תנוע צפונה, תחצה את המסילה, תתפצל לשלושה ראשים ותתקוף בו זמנית את חורבות אל – בורג’ על חוף הים, את “המזגגה” (בית החרושת לזכוכית שהקים הברון רוטשילד) ואת הכפר מצפון ומזרח. פלוגה ג’ תנוע מתחנת הרכבת בזיכרון, בין המסילה וחוף הים ותתקוף מדרום. כוח מפלוגה ב’ יתקוף את בית הספר שעל הגבעה השולטת על הכפר ממזרח. יתר הכוח מפלוגה ב’ ישמש ככוח עתודה. פלוגת הנשק המסייע תפתח באש מרגמות ומק”בים למטרות סיוע שנקבעו, ויחידה של חיל הים תחסום מצד הים את בריחת האויב. מועד הפעולה נקבע ליום ה- 23.5.48, אחרי חצות. התנועה ליעד תחל בחצות ושעת ה- ש’ תקבע עם התייצבות הכוחות בנקודת ההסתערות.

התנועה ליעד החלה כמתוכנן, אולם פלוגה א’ נתגלתה עם חציית מסילת הברזל ואז ניתנה הפקודה לשאר הכוחות להסתער. הפעולה התנהלה כמתוכנן, למרות אש צלפים מיומנת ומדויקת מרכס הגבעות המזרחי שהאטו את תנועת הכוח. לאחר קרב כבד מבית לבית ובשימוש נרחב ברימוני יד וחיסול כ- 10 צלפים, תם הקרב בשעה 08:00 לערך. הכוחות נערכו להגנה היקפית, יחידות עסקו באיסוף נשק ובריכוז הגברים לצורך תחקיר וזיהוי והעברתם יחד עם שאר התושבים, למקומות אחרים שעליהם הוחלט ונעשה על ידי רשויות ויחידות אחרות.

לאויב היו כ- 70 הרוגים.

בקרב על כיבוש טנטורה נפלו 14 לוחמים. אחד הלוחמים היה מחיל הים.

מרשם הקרב
© כל הזכויות שמורות לעמותת אלכסנדרוני

Google Translate

The Alexandroni Association 

The story of Tantura – the end of the blood libel 

In January 2000, an investigative article was published in Maariv newspaper, initiated by one, Teddy Katz, who claims to be a historian, about a massacre allegedly committed by the 33rd Battalion fighters of defenseless people after the battle of Tantura. The brigade’s fighters went into a legal and public battle to clear their name and remove the unjustified stain that the “historian” had inflicted on them. The following is a summary of the affair, at the end of which justice was served. A. introduction 1. In March 1998, Mr. Teddy Katz, a graduate student, submitted an MA thesis in fulfillment of some of the requirements for obtaining a master’s degree from the Department of Middle Eastern History, Faculty of Humanities, University of Haifa. The title of the work is “The departure of the Arabs from villages at the foot of the southern Carmel in 1948”. 2. Chapter 4 of the master’s work, which is in fact the main chapter in it, deals with the “affair of the village of a-Tantura.” The chapter describes the battle that took place in the village of Tantura and the sands that surround it, on the night between the 22nd and 23rd of May 1948. 3. In the introduction to Chapter 4 of the work, Mr. Katz writes the following: The total number of Jewish deaths – 14 in number, including the man from the Palyam (naval commands – the naval arm of the Palmach), who fell from the fire of our forces. Of the Tantura men, no more than 10 or 20 fell in the battle itself, But at the end of the day, no less than 200 to 250 men were killed in the village, in circumstances where the villagers were completely unarmed and defenseless. These are the facts as coming from the evidenses that some will be brought in the following parts (page 88 to the work) 4. And so Mr. Katz actually attributed to the fighters and commanders in the 33rd Battalion of the Alexandroni Brigade who took an active part in the battles in which the brigade fought in the War of Independence, including the battle for the conquest of the village of Tantura, a heinous war crime of mass slaughter of hundreds of people., in circumstances they were defenceless and unarmed. 5. The publication of these things caused a great deal of controversy, and even more publications in the various media. In a considerable part of the discussions held on the subject, Mr. Katz participated as a “guest of honor” and he announced that he stood firmly behind the things written by him. The public response to the accusations leveled at the Alexandroni fighters by Mr. Katz was extremely harsh, and in an article published in the Maariv newspaper on January 21, 2000, Prof. Asa Kasher, author of the IDF Code of Ethics, was also quoted as calling the “massacre” executers, which he does not doubt, as “war criminals.” 6. Indeed, a fierce battle was fought in the village of Tantura and on the sands around it, in May 1948, as shown above. In that battle Alexandroni’s warriors lost 14 of their comrades, and even the enemy knew many losses. At dawn, however, the village surrendered and no one was shot by Alexandroni fighters after the end of the battle, being “unarmed and defenseless,” as Mr. Katz’s malicious accusation. 7. The Alexandroni warriors, who fought in the War of Independence of the State of Israel as young men, could not rest on their laurels in the face of the false accusations leveled at them, and they decided to embark on a journey, perhaps the last of their lives, to clear their name. The journey was conducted on three fronts simultaneously: the legal front, the academic front and the public front. Advocate Giora Ardinst accompanied and accompanies the Alexandroni warriors faithfully and faithfully in their war on the three fronts. B. The legal front 8. On April 16, 2000, eight of Alexandroni’s fighters filed a defamation suit against Katz in the Tel Aviv District Court (TA 1686/00 Ben Zion Frieden and others vs. Tedi Katz). 9. After Mr. Katz’s attempts to get the lawsuit dismissed outright and to prevent the questioning by making various allegations which failed, he filed a third-party notice against the University of Haifa, which he claimed was responsible for supervising him and the way his work was written.  10. As part of the prosecution, document disclosure proceedings took place and as part of them, most of the recordings of the interviews conducted by Mr. Katz were handed over to Alexandroni’s fighters. Alexandroni warriors bothered to transcribe the recordings and even translated into Hebrew the same conversations that originally took place in Arabic, using a professional translator whose mother tongue is Arabic. 11. From comparing the recordings with the quotes that appear in Katz’s work, it was revealed to Alexandroni’s warriors, to their amazement, that Katz systematically and biasedly distorted the things told to him by his interviewees and that his “academic” work is nothing but a dense fabrication, distortions and false quotes. These are not “mistakes” made in good faith but, as can be easily discerned, the actual method of false citations that are one-sided and whose purpose is to prove a pre-decided conclusion. 12. After two days in which Mr. Katz was questioned in court about his affidavit in Advocate Giora Ardinst, in which Mr. Katz’s false citations were revealed in his work, and the unbridgeable gaps between Mr. Katz and the things he was told in interviews were revealed as he edited, Mr. Katz signed a letter of apology which is his language:  “In March 1998, I submitted a thesis which forms part of the fulfillment of the requirements for a master’s degree in the history of the Middle East at the University of Haifa (hereinafter -“thesis”). In the chapter on the village of Tantura, it was written by me, that the overall picture that emerges from the evidence is that soldiers from the Alexandroni Brigade engaged for several hours after the end of the battle in a deadly hunt for adult men to kill, when at the end of the day were no less than 250-200 Men were killed in circumstances in which the villagers were unarmed and completely defenseless. I would like to make it clear that after re-examining things written by me, it is clear to me beyond any doubt that there is no basis for claiming that there were in tantura people killed after the surrender of the village, by fighters of the Alexandroni Brigade, or by another force of the Yishuv. I would like to make it clear that even the things written by me were probably misunderstood, as I did not mean to say that there was a massacre in Tantura and even today I say that there was no massacre in Tantura. I believe in the people of Alexandroni who have denied the massacre at all level, and I regret all the implicit conclusion from the work regarding the massacre or the killing of unarmed and defenseless people. In light of the above, I find it appropriate to express my sincere apologies to the brigade’s fighters, to their families and to the families of the brigade’s victims in which false accusations of this kind were made. This announcement will be published in the press in an appropriate size and location.” 13. As part of the settlement agreement signed between the parties (and which Mr. Katz tried to withdraw from the day after it was signed), Mr. Katz undertook to publish the half-page apology letter in two daily newspapers. The settlement agreement was given a judgment approval after the court rejected all of Mr. Katz’s claims as if the agreement had been signed by him in a moment of “weakness of the mind.” Needless to say, the letter of apology signed by Mr. Katz was drafted with his lawyer, Adv. Amatzia Atlas, who was present at the meeting at which the letter of apology and the settlement agreement were signed. 14. To complete the picture, it should be noted that on January 17, 2001, Mr. Katz filed an appeal against the judgment of the District Court and his decision not to set it aside (CA 456/01). In 6/11/2001 Supreme Cort discussed the appeal in front of three Judges Matza, Strasberg-Cohen and Naor. The Supreme Court dismissed the defendant’s appeal, did not allow him to withdraw from the undertaking to publish his apology.  and ordered him to pay the costs. C. The Academic Front 15. Mr. Katz’s Master’s thesis was done under the supervision of Prof. Keys Phiro and with the assistance of Dr. Ilan Pappe, who knowingly gave a hand to Katz’s false “thesis,” and even continues to spread lies and nonsense over every possible stage he gets. 16. Following the serious allegations made during Mr. Katz’s cross-examination, a letter of complaint was sent on behalf of the Alexandroni Warriors on December 26, 2000 to the Rector of the University of Haifa, Prof. Aharon Ben Zeev, and to other relevant bodies at the University of Haifa. In court. 17. Following the serious findings that were revealed, as detailed in the aforementioned letter, two committees were set up by the Rector of the University of Haifa: one to examine the inconsistencies between what Katz said by his interviewees, as they appear in the interview tapes, and another to examine the procedures of awarding advanced degrees (MA and PhD) at the University of Haifa in general, and in the case of Mr. Katz in particular.  18. The Committee for the Examination of Katz’s Work, whose members were Prof. Amatzia Baram, Head of the Jewish-Arab Center, Prof. Rafi Talmon, Head of the Department of Arabic, Dr. Ibrahim Jarris, of the Department of Arabic and Prof. Yosef Nevo, of the Department of Middle Eastern History, found that there is a gap between the recordings and writings and the thesis text. On June 10, 2001, the report of the committee was submitted to the Rector of the University of Haifa, which detailed the aforementioned gaps according to three degrees of severity. For example, 14 cases were found in which there were gaps of a high degree of severity, in which elements that have no mention in the recordings or lists written by Katz were given as quotations. The committee noted that “the overall picture obtained from the summary of all the gaps is certainly unflattering,” and that “the work failed at the stage of putting the raw material to the reader’s judgment, both in his organization according to strict selection and criticism, and in what appears to be non-respect to the evidence provided by the interviewees.” 19. In light of the severity of the findings, the report was submitted to the Graduate Studies Authority, which is the body responsible for the MA and doctoral dissertations at the University of Haifa. On 20.11.2001 The Committee for Advanced Studies published that the thesis can not be accepted as is. The university decided to postpone the approval of the dissertation and the grade Katz received for six months, during which Katz would have to correct his work, and announced that if he did not do so, the recognition of the work would be permanently revoked. In addition, the rector of the university ordered the removal of the work from the university shelves, and also asked other university libraries to act in a similar manner. 20. The results of the struggle of the Alexandroni warriors on the academic front show that Mr. Katz is not a “New Historian” and not an “old historian”, but a systematic salesman who deceived the academic institution, who gave him the patronage and gave his work the legitimacy, as he deceived many others. D. The public front  21. The extensive media coverage of the Tantura affair over the past two years has put it on the public agenda. Therefore, the purpose of the public front is to remove the stain left by Mr. Katz and his supporters on the Alexandroni warriors. Thus, apart from the legal and academic proceedings conducted against Katz, the Alexandroni fighters have acted and continue to act against its ardent supporters in Katz’s “innovative” and unfounded thesis. 22. Dr. Ilan Pappe, an anti-Zionist historian who assisted in the preparation of the master’s work, was still standing behind Katz and pulling the puppets’ strings as he wished. All attempt to contact Dr. Pappe were responded in blatant lies rude style, which includes slander, insults and aggression and verbal violence, has also angered his academic staff members. Of late, a demand to internally sanction him in the university due to his disrespectful manners which are a breach of ethical standards in an academic institution. 23. In order to understand who Ilan Pappe is, we will mention that Dr. Pappe recently espoused an article on the Internet (written by other “luminaries”), according to which the Mossad and the CIA are behind the attack on the Twin Towers in New York on September 11, 2001. 24. Alexandroni fighters also turned to Prof. Asa Kasher, author of the IDF Code of Ethics, who accused them of committing a war crime, demanding that he apologize to them for the corrupt quoted from him in connection with the findings of Teddy Katz’s “academic” research and retract his statements. To date, Prof. Asa Kasher has not even bothered to respond to their request, thereby proving that ethics is far from him, and that he is in a hurry to align with the “choir” even when it sings false songs. 25. On January 20, 2003, Prof. Asa Kasher, who at the beginning of the affair stated that “a war crime was committed in Tantura,” withdrew his accusations, and in a letter he sent to the brigade’s fighters he said he was misled to think so from reading the first thesis.  After reading the extensive material accumulated on the subject, during the struggle waged by the brigade fighters, he came to the conclusion that the facts described in the thesis were incorrect, and expressed his apology to the brigade fighters for the anguish caused by words to the brigade veterans. 26. Historian Meir Pa’il, was from the beginning one of the ardent supporters of Teddy Katz’s innovative “thesis”, regreted on March 7, 2002 his accusations against the Alexandroni warriors, after re-reading the full material handed to him by them. And this is what he wrote: “In order to remove doubt about my concluding opinion on Teddy Katz’s research into the Tantura Conquest affair in the War of Independence, I consider it a moral, scientific and societal duty to inform you that, after further consideration and re-examination […] and after carefully reading the University of Haifa Advanced Studies committee I conclude, there is no, and there was no justification for imposing any moral blemish on the fighters of the 33rd Battalion of the “Alexandroni” Brigade, who occupied Tantura on May 24, 1948.  I have already stated publicly that the findings of the above research work of Teddy Katz should not be relied upon; and I hope that Teddy Katz will straighten things out in his renewed research. ” E. Epilogue 27. Alexandroni warriors have had success on the legal front, on the academic front and on the public front. The general public now knows that there was no massacre in Tantura and the uses of weapons of the Alexandroni warriors were pure. Not only did the Alexandroni warriors win the battle for the legacy of Tantura – the truth won. 28. On April 10, 2003, the Council for Advanced Studies of the University of Haifa convened, and rejected Teddy Katz’s revised “research” work. The council also ruled that Teddy Katz would not be able to obtain a master’s degree in a research track.   The work, which was prepared after the university decided to remove the previous work from its shelves, and allowed Mr. Teddy Katz to submit revised work, was submitted to five different judges. Two of the judges completely rejected the work, and the other three accepted it, but attached highly critical remarks. All five judges pointed to “research flaws” related to the research methodology and level of analysis. “The harsh criticism did not allow the Council for Advanced Study to approve the revised research work and award Katz a master’s degree,” said the university’s rector, Prof. Aharon Ben-Ze’ev. 29. The storm caused by the blood libel of Teddy Katz in the academic world, led Prof. Danny Censor of Ben-Gurion University of the Negev to set up a website, where all the documents from the libel trial that Teddy Katz conducted against the division’s fighters were gathered. The site can be accessed from the page in the Open Encyclopedia (Wikipedia), here.  Operation Port – opening of the road to Haifa With the liberation of Haifa, the departure of the Arabs of Caesarea and the separation of the Arab villages located along the Zichron Yaacov Road, the enemy was left with only one base in these villages. One base, to maintain the external connection, was by sea and is the village of Tantura which is located on the beach, north-west of Zichron Yaacov. It is no wonder, then, that the village soon became the main supply base for all the surrounding villages. A fleet of dozens of boats and small ships maintained regular contact with Lebanon and sailed for Tantura supplies, weapons and equipment and took fleeing refugees to Lebanon. As a result of this supply, the harassment of Jewish transportation on the Tel Aviv-Haifa road increased by the villages of the “Little Triangle”, to the point that the road was completely blocked by the rioters. The importance of Tantura was in its ability to preserve the momentum of Arab harassment on Jewish transportation between Tel Aviv and Haifa. The location of this enemy base within our territory was more serious than could be reconciled with.  Attempts to negotiate with the villagers for surrender, a negotiation conducted by one of the Hagana personnel in Zichron Yaacov, who was in close contact with the village dignitaries before the outbreak of the war. The negotiations failed due to the opposition of the young people of the village and the foreigners who were in it, unlike what happened in Fureidis and Jisr-a-Zarqa, where the residents agreed to surrender. In light of the failure of the negotiations, it was decided to occupy the village and purge the beach of enemy forces. According to the intelligence in our hands, there were about 300 fighters in the village, equipped with about 100 rifles, several dozen pistols and submachine guns, a number of 3” mortars and a 40 millimeter Bufors cannon (this information was not clearly confirmed). At the head of the fighters were probably four Englishmen, British army defectors, Arab police defectors and a number of Bosnian Muslim fighters. The task was assigned to the 33rd Battalion of the Alexandroni Brigade.  An early tour of the commanders was conducted, via a train journey from Hadera to Atlit. The train still operated under the auspices of the British who held the area of the port of Haifa. At the request of the patrol commander, the train near Tantura slowed down to get a broader idea, as the train stopped at Zichron Yaacov station, it was attacked by an Egyptian plane that missed it. In retrospect, it turned out that the intelligence was quite accurate. In light of the intelligence and reconnaissance, it was decided on the course of action: Attack on two main axes – Company A moves north, crosses the railway, splits into three heads and simultaneously attacks the ruins of al-Burj on the beach, the “glazier” (the glass factory established by Baron Rothschild) and the village to the north and east. Company C will move from the train station in Zichron, between the track and the beach, and will attack from the south. A force from Company B will attack the school on the hill that dominates the village to the east. The rest of the force from Company B will serve as a reserve force. The auxiliary weapons company will open fire machine guns and mortars for the stated aid purposes, and a naval unit will block the enemy’s escape from the sea. The date of operation is set for May 23, 1948, after midnight. At the point of assault. Movement to the destination began as planned, but Company A was discovered upon crossing the railroad and then the rest of the forces were ordered to storm in. The operation went as planned, despite skillful and precise sniper fire from the eastern hill ridge that slowed the movement of force. After a heavy battle from house to house and extensive use of hand grenades and the elimination of about 10 snipers, the battle ended at about 08:00. The forces were prepared for perimeter defense, units engaged in collecting weapons and concentrating the men for the purpose of interrogation and identification and transferring them along with the rest of the residents, to other places decided and done by other authorities and units. The enemy had about 70 killed. In the battle for the conquest of Tantura 14 warriors fell. One of the fallen fighters was from the Navy.

=======================================

https://www.aljazeera.com/news/2022/1/22/palestinians-call-for-probe-into-israeli-massacres-in-tantura

Palestinians call for probe into Israeli massacres in Tantura

At least 200 Palestinians were killed by Zionist gangs in the village of Tantura, which was razed in 1948.

Published On 22 Jan 202222 Jan 2022

The Palestinian Authority (PA) has called for the formation of an international commission to investigate the massacres committed by Israel in the Palestinian village of Tantura in 1948.

The call came after Israeli daily Haaretz reported on Thursday the discovery of a mass grave in Tantura village of Palestinians killed by Zionist gangs in 1948, when the modern state of Israel was formed.

Palestinians say multiple massacres of Palestinians by Zionist gangs took place in Palestinian villages during the 1948 war in a bid to forcefully expel at least 750,000 Palestinians from their homes and land, a tragedy Palestinians refer to as the Nakba, or catastrophe.

“The crimes of the occupation did not stop at the year 1948, but are still continuing in a racist and hateful manner, which calls for the opening of investigations into these crimes,” the PA Foreign Ministry said in a statement on Saturday.

The statement continued, “What is required is a broad international campaign to bring justice to the Palestinian victims and to punish Israeli officials and the official Israeli institution that continues to conceal and cover up the ugliness of these crimes and massacres.”

In its report, Haaretz said Israeli officers “of the 1948 battle at Tantura village [have] finally come clean about the mass killing of Arabs that took place after the village’s surrender”.

It added that a documentary titled Tantura is due to be aired online next week, noting that testimonies of Israeli soldiers who participated in the massacre will also be featured.

Haaretz said the graves of at least 200 Palestinians buried after their execution were located under the Dor Beach parking lot.

Translation: The current exhibition at the Palestine Museum in Birzeit includes photographs and documents about the Tantura massacre.

Power of narration

The massacre of Tantura took place on the night of May 22-23, 1948, according to Palestinian historians.

The PA statement said the facts of the Nakba are constantly being “obscured by successive Israeli governments to bury the truth of the crimes and massacres of these Zionist gangs, knowing that the leaders responsible for committing them are given high positions in the occupation army and in official Israeli institutions”.

The Haaretz revelations have prompted the ire of Palestinians, who have long documented their ethnic cleansing through oral and written accounts – such as Walid al-Khalidi’s historical book All That Remains – and say their accounts are always dismissed as unreliable unless recalled by Israelis involved in such atrocities.

Hashem Abu Shama, a Palestinian researcher, said on Twitter that the Haaretz story is more a reflection of Israeli historiography than it is about the massacred Palestinians.

“If anything, it demonstrates that colonial perpetrators, colonial academics, and colonial archives are automatically endowed with the authority to ‘narrate’,” he said.

And while Israeli historians such as Benny Morris have had access to archive files on the forced displacement of Palestinians but stopped short of using the term “ethnic cleansing”, others such as Israeli academic Ilan Pappe faced a harsh response from Israeli society for referring to the events of 1948 as such.

Pappe, who now teaches at Exeter University, was ridiculed and fired from his tenured position at Haifa University back in 2008 after insisting the Tantura massacre, which his student Teddy Katz exposed, took place.

Katz retracted his findings after a public campaign of intense pressure and intimidation.

SOURCE: AL JAZEERA AND NEWS AGENCIES


  =========================================================


https://www.ynet.co.il/entertainment/article/by511a6stk

“אנחנו חייבים להשוות את הנכבה עם השואה – ולהגיד במה זה שונה”

במאי הדוקו אלון שוורץ גדל עם אהבה עזה למולדת, אך כשנתקל במקרה הטבח המוכחש בטנטורה מ-1948, הוא הרגיש איך האדמה תחתיו רועדת. “זה היה טיהור אתני, וזה לא משהו שנעים להגיד. השפיעה עליי הידיעה שכולנו קורבנות של נרטיב מומצא”, הוא אומר לאחר הקרנת סרטו “טנטורה” בסאנדנס, ולא חושש מביקורת: “צריך להכיר בעוולות שלנו, גם אם הערבים טבחו בנו לא פחות”

אמיר בוגן|אתמול | 12:38
העשורים הראשונים בחייו של אלון שוורץ נראו פחות או יותר כמו הביוגרפיה התקנית של כל צבר טיפוסי. כבן למשפחה עתירת זכויות בהגשמת הארץ, נצר למקימי היישוב נהלל ומייסדי תנועת המושבים, אישיותו, דעותיו ואמונותיו התעצבו ברוח ארץ ישראל הישנה והטובה. הוא נולד ברחובות, ונדד עם אבא ואמא והאח שאול לשליחות בארצות הברית. אחרי שההורים שבו ארצה בלחץ הבנים בשנות ה-80, אלון השתלב מחדש במסלול החיים המקומי כבוגר – הוא התגייס למודיעין ואחרי השחרור פנה להייטק כיזם. ילד ישראלי טוב, ומאוד ציוני. כשמאס בלנהל אנשים, עשה הסבה מקצועית לקולנוע ובעקבותיה נתקל במקרה הטבח המוכחש בטנטורה מ-1948, שזעזע אותו. פתאום חלחלה בקרבו התובנה שארץ ישראל הישנה הייתה אולי טובה אבל לא תמיד צודקת, ושהוא התחנך בהשראתה תחת שקר והסתרה. הגילוי הזה גרם לו לחקור את הפרשה כבמאי תיעודי ולצאת למסע אל העבר האפל של המדינה – מסע שמתועד בסרטו “טנטורה” שחושף את לוחמי חטיבת אלכסנדרוני שמדברים לראשונה מול המצלמה ומעידים על שעוללו לפני 74 שנה בכפר הפלסטיני שלמרגלות הכרמל.

“מה שממש השפיע עליי היה הידיעה שכולנו קורבנות של נרטיב מומצא”, אומר שוורץ בריאיון לרגל הקרנת הבכורה של הסרט במסגרת התחרות הדוקומנטרית הבינלאומית בפסטיבל הקולנוע בסאנדנס. “כולנו חונכנו שאנחנו הצודקים ואנחנו הכי צדיקים ומוסריים. זה נראה לנו טבעי כמו שהשמש זורחת בבוקר, וכשהתחלתי את העבודה על הסרט עוד האמנתי שזה נכון. תיארתי לעצמי שאני נכנס למקרה של טנטורה, ואולי משהו קרה שם ואולי לא. אני קראתי כל מה שאפשר על הנושא ולאט לאט חלחלה ההכרה שזה לא רק טנטורה. זה אולי היה טבח המוני, אבל היו 50 מקרים אחרים, אולי יותר, ויש כאלה שאנחנו בכלל לא יודעים עליהם כי אף אחד לא דאג לתעד. בדרכנו, לקחנו בני אדם שלא היו יהודים וגירשנו אותם. זה היה טיהור אתני, וזה לא משהו שנעים להגיד. לא מדובר ברצח עם, אבל הטרנספר היה מתוכנן, וכל מי שמתכחש לכך ממציא נרטיב”.

זו לא הפעם הראשונה שפרשת טנטורה עולה לסדר היום, ולמעשה מי שהציף אותה בציבור בסוף שנות ה-90 היה אדם בשם תדי כץ, שעבודת מחקר שלו באוניברסיטת חיפה הציגה את המציאות ההיסטורית כפי שהתקבלה מראיונות של 70 עדים – מחציתם פלסטינים, ומחציתם ישראלים. המסמך פורץ הדרך של כץ נגנז בהליך משפטי אגרסיבי, שיזמו ותיקי חטיבת אלכסנדרוני. אולם ברשות החוקר נותרו המסמכים, הצילומים וגם הקלטות (כ-140 שעות של עדויות), ואלו מהווים נקודת התחלה למסע של שוורץ, שמרחיב ומעמיק אל תוך הסיפורים ומספק הוכחות משלימות משלו להטמנת גופות תושבי טנטורה בקבר אחים, שלפי טענה שעולה בסרט, נחפר ופונה לאחר מכן. הבמאי מספר כי הגיע לכץ כמעט במקרה, כחלק מתחקיר שערך לפני שלוש שנים לסדרה שניסה לפתח על דעיכת הדמוקרטיה הישראלית. אחד מהפרקים הוקדש לפעילותם של ארגוני השמאל החוץ-ממשלתיים – “בצלם”, “תעאיוש” ו”שוברים שתיקה”. כשהיוזמה לתיעוד המציאות הפוליטית הנוכחית בארץ כשלה, הוא פנה להיסטוריה, והחיפוש אחר תקדימים לתופעה הובילו אותו לתדי כץ ולמחקר שלו.

“הייתי מדוכא מהתקופה של ביבי והרגשתי שאני חייב לעשות משהו כדי לפרוק את התסכול שלי בדרך יצירתית, אבל אחרי שהפרויקט המקורי נתקע, גיליתי אדם בשם תדי כץ ופרסומים על כך שהוא שקרן גדול שעיוות את המציאות. מה שעורר את העניין שלי זה שברשותו 100 שעות של הקלטות. התקשרתי אליו וקבענו להיפגש”, משחזר שוורץ, שסרטו הקודם “הסודות של איידה” מ-2017 תיעד סיפור אישי של אחים זקנים שהופרדו אחרי השואה. “הגעתי לביתו ופגשתי גבר שבור גופנית אבל עם לב גדול. בסוף הריאיון הוא הסכים לתת לי את הקלטות ואני לא האמנתי שזה קורה. זה לא שהוא מייצג ארגון כלשהו והוא לא הציב תנאים. הוא בסך הכול רצה לספר את הסיפור. ולמרות זאת, עדיין פקפקתי בו. הוא נראה לי אדם ישר, אבל הייתי מודע לכך שייתכן שהוא משקר. וכשהתחלתי להאזין לקלטות מה שנחשף בפני היה בלתי נתפס. פשוט לא ייאמן. ואז הבנתי שנפל בידי אוצר, ממש זכיתי בפיס. הדבר הראשון שעשיתי היה להמיר את הקלטות לפורמט דיגיטלי”.

“עם שאינו יודע את עברו – ההווה שלו על הפנים והעתיד שלו בזבל”

הפגישה עם כץ, תושב קיבוץ מגל בשנות ה-70 המאוחרות לחייו, צולמה ואיתה אנחנו עושים היכרות לא רק עם חומרי המקור עליו מסתמך התחקיר של “טנטורה” – אלא גם עם האדם שחשף אותם. כץ המתנייד באמצעות כיסא גלגלים, אב שכול שבתו נהרגה בתאונת דרכים במהלך שירותה הצבאי, אינו נראה במיטבו אך נחוש מאוד בהגנה על הממצאים שסיפק בעבודת המחקר שלו, ומביע חרטה על כך שהסכים להצעת הפשרה של בית המשפט בתביעה שהוגשה נגדו. אל מול מלחמת החורמה שניהלו לוחמי אלכסנדרוני והפניית הגב של אוניברסיטת חיפה לסטודנט שלה, מקצה הסרט מקום להתעמרות המערכתית בכץ. ההיסטוריון פרופ’ יואב גלבר, שפסל את העבודה בדיעבד בטענה של אי עמידה בסטנדרטים אקדמיים, תרם לצנזור המחקר וכיום הוא ממשיך להתייחס בזלזול לעדויות. מבחינה זו, “טנטורה” שמביא את העדים למסך עושה גם איתן צדק, למרות התיאורים המזעזעים שיוצאים להם מהפה על הוצאות להורג, התעללות ואפילו אונס.
“לא כל הלוחמים הסכימו לדבר”, מבהיר שוורץ, “מתי רוצח מתוודה? אני לא חושב שהם רוצחים אבל הם היו חלק מקבוצה שאחראית לסיפור הזה ואחרי 60, 70, 80 שנה שאתה חי עם הסוד הזה – אתה רוצה לפרוק אותו. והיו גם כאלה שפשוט רואים בך חבר והם פשוט חולקים את המידע איתך ככזה. וחלקם לא אכפת להם, הם פשוט מספרים את האמת. אני חושב שחלקם גם רוצים לחשוף את העוולות, אבל הם חשים לויאליות ליחידה ולחברים וזה קשה להם. ויש אנשים שטוענים שהם זקנים ובוודאי כבר סנילים. אבל הם ממש לא סנילים, והם כולם ידעו על מה הם מדברים. הם זכרו”.

האנשים האלה למודי ניסיון מהתקדים של כץ, ובוודאי היו חשדנים. איך גרמת להם לדבר בכזו פתיחות? “כשאתה פונה למישהו שיש לו טראומה ופוסט-טראומה והוא מסתיר משהו ואולי הוא עומד לסיים את חייו בקרוב – יש לזה כוח. בשבילם טנטורה היה זיכרון שהם רצו לחלוק, והייתי צריך להניע אותם לדבר. זה משחק של חתול ועכבר, אבל אני לא חוקר משטרה והם לא חשודים. אתה משוחח איתם וזוכה באמונם. פניתי להרבה אנשים מאלכסנדרוני, מכל מיני קבוצות שונות מהחטיבה. כולם ידעו על הסיפור של תדי כץ, אבל לא כולם התרגשו ממנה, ואחרים כבר פחות חששו להיחשף או אמרו לעצמם שבשלב הזה של חייהם כבר לא אכפת להם. והיו גם כאלה שלא דיברו עם תדי, אבל דיברו לסרט. כל אחד עם הבחירות שלו. השוק עבורי היה שהם חיים עם הסיפור הזה כל חייהם, אבל אנחנו כחברה לא יודעים על זה כלום. ואם מישהו הזכיר משהו אז רובנו רואים בזה ‘דמיון מזרחי’. נכבה חרטה. אז הערבים אולי משקרים, אבל אלו הסבים שלנו שמדברים פה”.
באופן אישי, אתה שומע את הסבים שלנו מדברים על פשעים נוראיים שהם היו שותפים להם. איך זה גרם לך להרגיש בזמן אמת במהלך הראיונות? “רוב האנשים שראיינתי הם יותר מבוגרים מ-80, ורוב רובם לא רצחו. הם עברו טראומה והם ראו מה שהם ראו וניסו להסתיר את זה. והיו גם כאלה שהעדיפו להאמין לסיפור שהם סיפרו לעצמם, שכל הדברים האלה לא התרחשו. אני גם מזכיר לעצמי שהם עברו המון. הם ראו חברים שלהם שנהרגו, ואני מבין אותם שאלו דברים שעדיף לשכוח, ואני לא שופט אותם. באופן אישי באתי מוכן. אני האדם הראשון שהיו ברשותו העדויות המוקלטות, ובאיכות סאונד מיטיבית. ממש כמו בלש אני יודע מה כל אחד מהמרואיינים שלי אמר לפני, ואני יודע מי חבר של מי. שיתפתי איתם את החומרים – ההקלטות וגם המסמכים והתמונות – ועוררתי את הזיכרון שלהם. ידעתי מה אני עושה, ומריאיון לריאיון למדתי יותר ויותר איך לגשת אליהם. אני לא חוקר משטרה, והכול נעשה באופן ידידותי ועדין. הייתי ‘השוטר הטוב’ והם התייחסו אליי בהתאם”.
מתוך הסרט “טנטורה”
התרומה הגדולה של שוורץ לשיח על תולדות המדינה היא הדרך שבה הוא מפרק את הנרטיב הציוני, ובונה אותו מחדש תוך הטמעת הנרטיב הפלסטיני של הנכבה, ומתוך נקודת מבטם של הלוחמים. בכך הוא מנסה לעצב מחדש עבורו ועבורנו אפשרות להצדקת קיומה של המדינה היהודית, אבל מתוך מבט כן לעבר, בלי שקרים: “גם אם נזכור את ההקשר של השואה ואיך הערבים פתחו במלחמה, נדרשת הבנה של מה שעשינו עם מיליון אנשים. זה הודר מהסיפור הלאומי שלנו והמיתוסים שלנו. ההבנה הזאת היא מה שמטלטל את הצופים וזה מה שטלטל אותי כבמאי, ההבדל בין הסיפורים שאנחנו מספרים לעצמנו אל מול המציאות. דחקנו עם אחר והקמנו מדינה משלנו כמעשה פלא, ואני בעדו. זה פרדוקס. קשה להשלים עם מה שאירע בדרך להשגת המטרה – להקים מדינה יהודית שאני תומך בה. לא שאני יודע איך אפשר היה לעשות אחרת, אבל ההבנה שמה שסיפרו לי זה לא האמת היה קשה לי אפילו יותר מלשמוע על המקרים של ההרג עצמו. זה קרה בכל מקום”.
עכשיו אחרי ההתפכחות שלך, איך אתה מסביר את המעמד של הנכבה כטאבו שאסור לדבר עליו, אפילו היום יותר מ-70 שנה אחרי? “הנכבה מערערת את הצדקנות המוחלטת שאנחנו מייחסים לעצמנו. העם היהודי כמעט והוכחד, ואני לא מתווכח על כך שאם היינו מפסידים במלחמת העצמאות היינו חדלים מלהתקיים. אבל לחשוב שהמטרה של כל הערבים הייתה להשמיד אותנו ולחשוב שהמענה היה לזרוק את כולם מפה, או להיכנס לכפרים ולהרוג את כל הגברים כדי ללמד לקח – בשבילי זה נורא. שלוש שנים אחרי השואה יהודים מורים לאנשים לחפור בורות ויורים בהם? זה לא משנה אם 70 נהרגו או 250. הדבר העצוב הוא שכחברה אנחנו מתכחשים לעבר. בהשראת יגאל אלון, שהמשפט שלו פותח את הסרט, אני יכול להגיד שעם שאינו יודע את עברו – ההווה שלו על הפנים והעתיד שלו בזבל. זה מה שעצוב ואנחנו צריך לצמוח מזה כחברה, ולהאמין שאנחנו יכולים להיות טובים יותר, ולא בהכרח לחיות על חרבנו. ישראלים הפסיקו לחלום על עולם טוב יותר”.

במה הסרט שלך יכול לשנות במקום שבו מחקרים אקדמיים של כץ ואחרים כשלו? “אני חושב שזה ש’ההיסטוריונים החדשים’ בשנות ה-80 כתבו כמה מחקרים על פרטים קטנים שמבוססים על מסמכים כאלה או אחרים גרם למזעור של הנכבה. אני מאמין שבעולם של פוסט-אמת, אנחנו צריכים להגיד את האמת. אני מאמין שהאמת משחררת, וככל שמדובר בנכבה, המדינה צריכה להפסיק להסתתר. אנחנו חברה שצריכה לדעת מה היא עוללה, איך פעלנו אז ואיך אנחנו פועלים היום. יש להבין שזה לא סכסוך בין יהודים לטרוריסטים, אלא בין שני עמים. אם אנחנו מעוניינים בדיאלוג, אנחנו צריכים להבין את הצד של הפלסטינים, ומה בעצם הם רוצים מאיתנו. יש להכיר בעוול שנגרם להם. הסרט לא מתיימר להגיד איך לפתור את הסכסוך, אבל הוא כן מראה את החשיבות העליונה של הכרה בנכבה כצעד ראשון לדיאלוג. וזה הכרחי בשבילנו הישראלים לפני הכול, כי זה העבר שלנו. ואז נבין שאנחנו לא תמיד צודקים ולא קדושים. אנחנו אומה מיוחדת, אבל מלאה בפגמים. אם לא נסתכל במראה, אז תמיד נחשוב שאנחנו הכי יפים, כמו באגדות”.

“אנחנו אולי מהטובים בעולם, אבל אי אפשר להיות חברה למופת ולהחביא שלדים בארון או במגרש חניה”

אחת התובנות המכלילות שעולות מצפייה ב”טנטורה” היא כמה משאבים רוחניים, תרבותיים וכלכליים הושקעו על ידי הממסד כדי לטשטש ראיות ולמחוק את הרוחות מן העבר, לכאורה כדי לגונן על האזרחים ולשמר את המוסר הצה”לי הידוע. בעוד שהפרקטיקה המפא”יניקית הזאת נתקלת בהתנגדות ערה סביב פרשות כמו היחס ליהודי המזרח וחטיפת ילדי תימן, ככל שמדובר בזוועות הנכבה – הדיון נותר מחוץ לשיח. “המציאות שלנו נוצרת דרך צנזורה עצמית, כאילו בניסיון לגונן עליך. במקום להתבונן למציאות בעיניים, כמדינה אנחנו חיים במציאות חלופית”, אומר שוורץ, “ברור שהסיפור על הנכבה הוא הרבה יותר מפרשת חטיפת ילדי תימן. לא חקרתי, אבל אני בטוח שהיו מקרים כאלה. בישראל יש תחרות בין המגזרים לגבי מיהו הקורבן. כולם רוצים להיות הקורבן, אבל רק לא הערבים. הם אף פעם לא הקורבן. אני חושב שאנחנו צריכים להתבגר ולהיות פחות נאיבים, וזה לא סוף העולם להכיר בעוולות שלנו, גם אם הערבים טבחו בנו לא פחות”.
מה שמוזר זה שדווקא הימין הקיצוני תמיד התבטא בחופשיות על מורשת הטרנספר, בעוד השמאל התכחש אליה. “זה נכון, כי הימין בעד זה. מה שהפתיע אותי שהשמאל מסרב לקבל את הסיפור הזה. אבל מבחינתי אני מאמין במדינה יהודית, אפילו אם ההיסטוריה שלה מוכתמת בדם. ואני חושב שאם המטרה של הימין זו מדינה דו-לאומית, אז השמאל הוא הרבה יותר ציוני”.
מאמצי ההשתקה של חטאי העבר מזכירים את פועלם של מכחישי השואה – באקדמיה, אבל גם מטעם השלטון במדינות כמו פולין, הונגריה ומדינות אחרות שמתביישות בעברן. “תמיד אומרים שאסור להשוות עם השואה. הדעה שלי היא שאנחנו חייבים להשוות ולהגיד במה זה שונה. ישראל לא ביצעה רצח עם מתוכנן, ולא הייתה כוונה להשמיד את הערבים. זו לא הייתה התוכנית של בן גוריון, ובכך הוא שונה מהנאצים וממשטרים אחרים ברחבי העולם. אבל כן הייתה תוכנית להיפטר מהם, והתוכנית הזאת הוסתרה היטב. ובגלל שבן גוריון היה פיקח מאוד, מכיוון שלא הייתה תוכנית לרצח עם תאי גזים ורכבות, במקומות כמו טנטורה אנשים פעלו באופן עצמאי להשגת המטרה והמפקדים לא אמרו שום דבר ולא עצרו אותם. אבל מההיבט העקרוני, צריך להבין שאנחנו לא העם היחיד שחי תחת טראומה רב-דורית. הנכבה, גם אם היא קטנה בהיקפה ביחס למקרים אחרים בעולם, היא מספיקה כדי לגרום לטראומה, וצריך להכיר בה. אנחנו לא מהגרועים בעולם, אולי מהטובים דווקא. אבל אי אפשר להיות חברה למופת ולהחביא שלדים בארון או במגרש חניה”.

נתקלת בהתנגדות על רקע עשיית הסרט? “עדיין לא. ההתנגדות דווקא באה מהצד של המשפחה. אמא שלי חששה שאני נכנס לדיכאון, ודודתי שהיא מורה להיסטוריה לקח קשה את זה שאני מספר את הסיפור. יש אנשים שמקורבים למשפחה ולא מעוניינים לשמוע מזה, זה מזעזע אותם”.
החשיפה ל”טנטורה” בציבור צפויה לגדול כשהוא ישודר בעתיד ב-HOT8 (שתמכה בהפקה יחד עם הקרן החדשה לקולנוע וטלוויזיה), אבל הקרנת הבכורה בסאנדנס כבר מספיקה לאתגר את השיח הפוליטי בארץ, וכן לעורר קולנוענים פלסטינים ופעילים פרו-פלסטינים למיניהם שמתלוננים ברשתות החברתיות על כך שהסרט מובא מעיניים ישראליות, בעוד שעדויות ניצולי הטבח (חלקן מקבלות במה בסרט) הודרו מאז ומתמיד. “אני יודע על כמה קולנוענים ערבים שניסו לעשות סרט על הפרשה מנקודת המבט של הקורבנות, אבל מבחינתי ברגע שהלוחמים הסכימו לדבר איתנו ולחלוק את סיפורם, הכיוון של הסרט השתנה”, הוא אומר, ונראה שהוא מודע לכך שיהיה מי שיראה בעדויות שבסרט כהודאה באשמה, והרשות הפלסטינית כבר הספיקה לדרוש חקירה בינלאומית של הפרשה: “תמיד יהיה מי שישתמש בזה, אבל כל המחקרים האקדמיים פורסמו בעבר וזמינים באנגלית לכולם. הסרט רק מנגיש את העובדות לקהל, וזה לא נעשה מספיק”.
יהיו ישראלים שיאשימו אותך שאתה גורם נזק ומוציא כביסה מלוכלכת לעולם בעבור תהילה וכסף. “אם מישהו חושב שאני עושה את זה מתאוות בצע, הוא צריך לבדוק את עצמו. אני בא מהייטק, ובחרתי ביוזמתי לעזוב את המקצוע כדי לעשות סרטים תיעודיים. לא עושים מזה כסף. מה שגורם לי לקום בבקרים זה החלומות. אני רווק, וזה לא משהו סקסי לחלוק עם בחורה, שאתה עושה סרט תיעודי על טבח. זה משפט פתיחה נורא. אבל אני עושה את זה כדי להגשים את עצמי. זאת לא עבודה קלה לעשות סרטים דוקומנטריים. אתה משקיע את כל כולך בנושאים קשים. אני עצוב ואני מדוכא כי אני נחשף לחומרים האלה. הם כל כך קשים. ואז השלמת סרט של 90 דקות ואתה חושב עליו כמה ימים ואז ממשיך הלאה. תודה לאל שהעולם רוצה את הסרטים שלי. קיבלתי מימון ישראלי, אבל אני לא זקוק לו. אני אחד מהקולנוענים הבודדים שיכולים לעבוד בחו”ל. אני אעשה יותר כסף באמריקה, אבל אני בא מאידיאליזם. וכן חשוב שבעולם כולו יראו את הסרטים, וזה גם כך קורה. כולם הרי מחוברים לנטפליקס”.
יש רגע חזק בסרט, כשתדי כץ מוסר לך את הקלטות והוא מזהיר אותך: “ירדפו אותך כמו שרדפו אותי”. אתה חושש מזה? “אני לא חושב שמישהו ירדוף אותי. ישראל היא דמוקרטיה, גם אם בחיתוליה. אבל במיוחד אחרי הימים של ביבי ומירי רגב, יש לדעתי ממשלה מאוד מעניינת בישראל ואני שמח שפוליטיקאי ערבי ואיש ימין יכולים לשבת יחד באותה ממשלה. זו התרומה הכי גדולה של ביבי, הכישלון שלו הכשיר את זה. אני לא מאמין שיתנכלו לי מצד הממסד. ובכל מקרה, מי שרוצה להתווכח על העובדות מוזמן להתעמת איתי. השתקה היא מקצוע ויש ארגונים שזה התפקיד שלהם. לא רק בישראל, גם בארצות הברית. הם מונעים ממך להשמיע את קולך באמצעות הפעלת לחץ ציבורי וכלכלי. אולי הם ינסו לפעול גם נגדי. אבל אני יודע שאני עומד לחלוטין מאחורי העובדות. בדקתי את עצמי. תמיד יכולות ליפול טעויות, אבל עשייה דוקומנטרית היא לא בית משפט”.
מתוך הסרט “טנטורה”
באופן אישי, אתה מרגיש שבאמצעות הסרט עשית צדק עבור תדי כץ? “אין ספק בכך. היה לי חשוב להשלים את המעגל של תדי כץ מכיוון שהוא קורבן של השתקה. וגם אם עבודת המחקר שלו הייתה מגושמת מבחינת האקדמיה, האדם הזה עשה צעד נועז שאף אחד לא עשה בעבר. לבדוק בדקדקנות את ההיסטוריה של כפר אחד. זה מאוד חשוב. איסוף המידע שלו היה יוצא מן הכלל. אני חושב שהסרט הזה עושה עימו צדק. זה חלק מהמטרות שלו”.
מבחינה אישית, ייתכן שהשליחות שלך הסתיימה פה. מה הלאה? “אנשים חושבים שמה שעשיתי זה מטורף. התפתח טרנד לדבר על הנכבה באופן כללי, אבל כמו שעורך הדין שלי אומר לי – לקחתי את זה צעד אחד קדימה. זה סיפור אמיתי והוא יוצא מהלב שלי. תמיד מדובר בפרשנויות שונות ואפשר לספר סיפורים שונים, אבל זה הסיפור שאני מזהה ואני שלם איתו. אני יצאתי פגוע מהניסיון הזה, ואני צריך פסיכולוג עכשיו. ואם מישהו חושב שאני עושה את זה מסיבה אחרת מאשר שליחות אידיאולוגית, אז שיהיה. אבל עכשיו אחרי הסרטים שעשיתי על השואה ועל הנכבה, אני חושב שאני צריך לעשות משהו קליל יותר. משהו על יוגה, או אהבה או זוגיות”.
==============================================================
https://www.ynet.co.il/articles/0,7340,L-2093775,00.html
אש”ף מימן את הגנת החוקר שטען: צה”ל רצח

לאחר שפרסם מחקר על טבח במלחמת השחרור, נדרש החוקר תדי כץ לממן את תביעת הדיבה שהגישו נגדו הלוחמים. מי ששמח לסייע היה איש אש”ף פייסל חוסייני: הוא העניק אלפי דולרים להגנה המשפטית על המחקר, שהיווה הישג תעמולתי לפלסטינים. אבל כץ לא מתחרט על בקשת הכסף מהפלסטינים: “אף מוסד אחר לא עזר לי, וזה חשוב לאמת ההיסטורית”

עזרא דלומי עדכון אחרון:  01.09.02 , 09:08

כספים של אש”ף סייעו לממן חוקר שטען כי צה”ל ביצע טבח בתושבי הכפר הערבי טנטורה במלחמת השחרור, כך מדווח לראשונה היום (א’) “ידיעות אחרונות”.
הפלסטינים, שראו הישג תעמולתי כביר בטענה כי לוחמי חטיבת “אלכסנדרוני” ביצעו טבח בכ-200 מערביי טנטורה, שמחו להשתתף בהוצאות המשפטיות למימון התביעות שהוגשו נגד המחקר.
פייסל חוסייני, שהיה מחזיק תיק ירושלים באש”ף, שילם לחוקר תדי כץ אלפי דולרים למימון תביעת הדיבה שהגישו נגדו אנשי חטיבת “אלכסנדרוני”.
בשבוע שעבר אישר כץ כי בקיץ 2000, במהלך המשפט, ביקש – וקיבל – מחוסייני 8,000 דולר במזומן. חודש אחר כך ביקש כץ עוד 10,000 דולר, באמצעות עו”ד ג’וואד בולוס, עורך דינו של האוריינט האוס. אבל לטענתו, סכום זה מעולם לא הגיע לידיו.
כץ (59) חבר קיבוץ מגל, הכיר את חוסייני במסגרת פעילותו באירועי השלום. לכן, סיפר כץ, זה נראה טבעי לפנות אליו כידיד כדי לגייס כספים למשפטו. כץ סיפר כי הרעיון לבקש את עזרת הרשות הפלסטינית עלה בשיחה עם חברו, פעיל שלום שנרצח לפני כחצי שנה בפיגוע במסעדת “מצא” בחיפה.
הרעיון עלה לאחר שמיצה את כל האפשרויות האחרות לגיוס הכספים למשפטו: הוא גייס תרומות מחברים אישיים, מחברים למפלגה ומגוש שלום וקיבל את הכנסות הערב שאורגן לכבודו בתיאטרון “צוותא”. את קיבוצו מגל החליט כץ שלא לערב – והסתפק בקבלת הוצאות תחבורה וחופש מעבודה ככל שיידרש לצורך משפטו. במזכירות הקיבוץ הוחלט שאם כץ יפנה בבקשת עזרה כספית, יהיה הקיבוץ נכון לסייע. כץ לא פנה.
כץ סיפר כי “הגעתי אל פייסל חוסייני עם אותו חבר שנהרג, הצגנו לו את הנושא וביקשנו עזרה. חשבנו שיהיה לו בזה עניין. הסברתי לפייסל שיש תביעה, שהאוניברסיטה נבהלה מהמחקר ויוצאת חוצץ נגדו. הוא אישר את הבקשה. לא היה לי אף מוסד אחר לבקש ממנו עזרה. את הכסף קיבלתי ביד, במזומן. אני חושב שזה היה 8,000 דולר במזומן”.
מאז מת חוסייני. הכסף סייע למימון שכר טרחת עורך הדין שייצג את כץ בכל משפטיו, עו”ד אביגדור פלדמן. זאת למרות שפלדמן עצמו אמר השבוע כי “ברור שבעניין כזה לא הייתי הולך לבקש כסף מהאוריינט האוס”.
כץ עצמו אינו רואה כל פסול בתמיכתם של הפלסטינים: “בקשת הסיוע היא לגיטימית ונועדה לאפשר להוציא לאור את האמת ההיסטורית על מלחמת השחרור”. בחודשים האחרונים הוא עושה ימים כלילות בכתיבת העבודה מחדש. עם זאת, הוא חושש שחשיפת העובדה שקיבל כספים מהרשות הפלסטינית, תהווה עילה למוסדות האוניברסיטה לדחות את גרסתו המתוקנת לה הקדיש ימים ולילות רבים.
פטרונו של כץ, ד”ר אילן פפה מאוניברסיטת חיפה, מצדיק את הפנייה לקבלת כספים מחוסייני. “ברשות הפלסטינית יש עניין בעבודה של כץ. הם רצו לתרגם אותה לכמה שפות. ההתקשרות עמם הייתה לאחר הגשת המחקר שלא נעשה מטעמם. אבל אין מחקר בעולם שאיננו משרת מישהו”.
על דעתו חולק פרופ’ יואב גלבר, ראש בית הספר להיסטוריה באוניברסיטת חיפה, שהיה בין המתנגדים החריפים לעבודתו של כץ. לדבריו, “אני אמנם בספק אם יש משמעות אקדמית לעובדה שהוא קיבל כסף פלסטיני, זו בעיה ציבורית של מדינת ישראל. אבל הסיפור של הכסף מכניס ממד חדש לפרשה. זה לא עסק תמים. הם לא נותנים לו כסף סתם. זה חלק מהמערכה המתנהלת נגד מדינת ישראל במסגרת האינתיפאדה”.

=======================================
https://www.haaretz.co.il/misc/1.821632
תדי כץ: איני רואה כל פסול בקבלת כסף מפייסל חוסייני

02.09.2002 00:00 עודכן ב: 17.08.2011 17:26
מאת דוד רטנר
שמורתגובותשתף בפייסבוק

ההיסטוריון תדי כץ, תושב קיבוץ מגל שעבודת המאסטר שלו באוניברסיטת חיפה טענה לטבח שבוצע בערביי הכפר טנטורה בשנת 1948 במלחמת העצמאות, וניהל על כך מאבק משפטי עם יוצאי חטיבת “אלכסנדרוני”, קיבל מהשר לשעבר לענייני ירושלים ברשות הפלשתינית, פייסל חוסייני, 8,000 דולר למימון המאבק המשפטי. העברת הכסף פורסמה אתמול בעיתון “ידיעות אחרונות”.

כץ אמר אתמול שאינו מעוניין להגיב על הידיעה, אלא רק לאחר שיגיש את הגירסה המתוקנת של עבודתו לאוניברסיטה. עם זאת, הוא חזר על דבריו לפיהם אינו רואה כל פסול בקבלת הכסף ממשרדו של חוסייני – שמת לפני כחצי שנה – והוסיף כי הוא אינו רואה את הסכום שקיבל כ”כסף של הרשות הפלשתינאית, אלא של מוסד המחקר שבראשו עמד חוסייני”.

מקורב של כץ אמר שלא הייתה לו ברירה: “כץ, קיבוצניק שאינו בעל אמצעים, נדרש כבר בשלב התביעה שהגישו נגדו יוצאי חטיבת אלכסנדרוני, לשלם 17 אלף שקלים. כאשר ביקש לצרף לתביעה נגדו את אוניברסיטת חיפה כצד שלישי, הוא נדרש לשלם עוד 30 אלף שקלים. וכל זאת, עוד לפני שדיברנו על שכר טרחת עורך הדין שייצג אותו במשפט” (אביגדור פלדמן. ד”ר).

תחילת הפרשה בשנת 1998. כץ הגיש עבודת מאסטר לאוניברסיטת חיפה על נטישת הערבים מהכפרים בכרמל הדרומי ובחוף הכרמל ב-48′. על סמך עדויות שהגיעו אליו – גם של ערבים וגם של יהודים – הוא טען שבכפר טנטורה (שעל שרידיו ממוקמים היום היישובים דור ונחשולים), נעשה טבח בכמה עשרות מתושבי הכפר. כץ טען כי חיילים מחטיבת אלכסנדרוני ביצעו את הטבח, והם אלה שקברו את הנטבחים בקבר אחים. העבודה זכתה בציון 97 מבודקיה באוניברסיטה.

כאשר התפרסמה העבודה בעיתונים הגישו אנשי עמותת אלכסנדרוני, שהכחישו ומכחישים את דבר קיום הטבח מכל וכל, תביעה נגד כץ על הוצאת לשון הרע. המשפט התנהל בבית המשפט המחוזי בתל אביב, ובמהלכו חשפו עורכי הדין של עמותת אלכסנדרוני מקרים של אי התאמה בין הקלטות המרואיינים של כץ, לבין התיעוד שנרשם בעבודה שהגיש לאוניברסיטה.

כבר ביוני 2000, כאשר הבין כץ שהוא עומד בפני מאבק משפטי ארוך ויקר, הוא פנה בבקשת עזרה כספית לפייסל חוסייני. מקורב לכץ אומר שאת הכסף המזומן הוא קיבל ממשרדו של חוסייני במהלך אוגוסט 2000, כלומר כחודש לפני פרוץ אינתיפאדת אל-אקצה.

בדצמבר 2000 חלה התפתחות במשפט: כץ הסכים לחתום על הסכם פשרה עם עמותת אלכסנדרוני, לפיו ייפרסם בעיתונים מודעת התנצלות גדולה, שבה יחזור בו מטענותיו על טבח שאירע בטנטורה. מקורביו של כץ אומרים שהוא הסכים לחתום על ההסכם זמן קצר אחרי שעבר אירוע מוחי. לדבריהם, הוא עשה זאת ברגע של חולשת דעת, מבלי שהתייעץ עם עו”ד פלדמן, ולאחר שהסתמך על עצות שקיבל מקרוב משפחה משפטן. כבר למחרת היום חזר בו כץ מהסכם הפשרה, אך בית המשפט העליון דחה את בקשתו לבטל את ההסכם.

אחרי שבבית המשפט המחוזי נחשפו כמה אי התאמות בין העדויות המוקלטות לתיעוד שלהן, החליטה אוניברסיטת חיפה לדרוש מכץ לבצע תיקונים בעבודה. בשנתיים האחרונות חוזר כץ על חלקים ממחקרו. לדברי מקורבים לו, הוא מצא עדויות וכתבות חדשות, שבהן מוזכר שנעשה טבח. לדברי המקורבים, כץ משוכנע היום, יותר מתמיד, כי בטנטורה נטבחו תושבים מקומיים. באוקטובר אמור כץ להגיש את העבודה המתוקנת לאוניברסיטה, לצורך בדיקה מחודשת.

=============================================================
https://www.nli.org.il/he/newspapers/dav/1948/05/24/01/article/28/?e=——-he-20–1–img-txIN%7ctxTI————–1

דבר⁩⁩, 24 מאי 1948
כיצד נכבש כפר טנטורה סופרנו מחדרה מודיע: לאחר פעולת-קרב מוצלחת של חיילינו נכנע — לאחר שעות אחדות, מאור הבוקר אתמול עד הצהרים — כפר הדייגים הנאה טנטורה, בן 2000 נפש. טנטורה עומדת במקום דוא העתיקה. כפר זה, היה, היחידי של התנגדות ערבית באזור השפלה ושימש גם מקום אספקה בים מהארצות השכנות. חיילינו, שהתקרבו לכפר בחצות, נתקלו בהתנגדות גדולה. עמדות הערבים היו מבוצרות. אחדות מהן מוקפות סלעים. בין עמדה לעמדה היה גם קשר טלפוני. ניכר היה שתכנית הביצורים עובדה על ידי מומחים אירופיים. אנשינו התגברו על ההתנגדות ונכנסו לכפר תוך כדי גרימת אבידות כבדות לאויב. בשעות הצהרים נכנע הכפר לפני לוחמינו. נלקח שלל רב של תחמושת ונישבו כי‭20-‬ גברים. הנשים והילדים הועברו לכפר הערבי פאראדיס. בטנטורה  הקים בשעתו מ. דיזנגוף בית- חרושת לזכוכית. בית זה בן שתי הקומות נראה מרחוק בכביש זכרון-יעקב—חיפה.

Oren Yiftachel and Rawia Aburabia Falsify Reality of the Bedouins

20.01.22

Editorial Note

A few days ago, Prof. Oren Yiftachel, a Geographer at Ben-Gurion University, and Dr. Rawia Aburabia, a Law faculty at Sapir College, published an opinion piece in Haaretz. They discussed the Bedouin in the Negev and the new electricity law, which would connect their dwellings to the national grid.  However, the article is underlined by a heavy political agenda as symbolized by their use of the word “apartheid.”

The authors claim that “The Bedouin have been living in the Negev for hundreds of years. And as all studies of this issue have proven, they owned much of it until they were dispossessed by the State of Israel… it’s vital to remember that the Bedouin didn’t take over this land; they were in the Negev long before Jewish settlement began.”

They argued a “troubling underlying reality of apartheid that goes far beyond the electricity law.” According to the authors, the Bedouins are “one of the weakest segments of Israeli society – a group far from receiving justice.”  A negative attitude toward the Bedouins “raises serious questions about the blindness and denial that afflict much of Israeli society.” For Yiftachel and Aburabia, this “incites against an entire community whose only crime is existing in a country that refuses to recognize it… After all, the Bedouin are citizens, aren’t they?”  Yiftachel and Aburabia call the critics “deceptive propaganda of right-wing extremist groups” that follows “the time-honored colonialist tradition of victim blaming.” It shows a “historical blindness to the Bedouin issue in particular and Israeli apartheid in general has penetrated deep into the public’s consciousness.”  

They claim that such “racist generalizations reveal the deeper problem – the apartheid in all the areas under Israel’s control, from the Jordan River to the Mediterranean Sea… Only under an apartheid regime could a settler… who lives on stolen Palestinian land in the West Bank settlement of Ofra, accuse an indigenous community that has been living on its lands for hundreds of years of “occupation.” Only in an apartheid regime could… settlements, ignore the real occupation, under whose auspices those illegal settlements for Jews only were built in the West Bank.”

Moreover, this is an “ugly flood of inflammatory, racist discourse against the Bedouin coming from large swathes of Jewish society. This is an outstanding example of blaming the victim, behavior so beloved of colonialist regimes.”  According to the authors, a settler from Judea and Samaria “is an illegal occupier, part of the machinery of occupation that commits war crimes on a daily basis.”  The settler’s “vitriolic statements reveal the apartheid regime between the Jordan River and the Mediterranean Sea. The obvious and necessary step now is for all true supporters of democracy, in the Negev and throughout Israel, to join the battle against this racist regime.”

The authors neglect to inform the readers about the widespread violation of law in the Negev and only briefly stated that “Actual crimes committed in the south must be condemned, but it’s important not to forget the facts.” 

However, the article is egregious on many counts and needs to be corrected.

While some Bedouins could prove ownership of land, it does not prove that all Bedouins are landowners, as the authors falsely claim. The fact that Bedouins have roamed the Negev with their flocks does not give them ownership of this land. In the same vein, the fact that people live and walk in an area does not mean they own these places. Only properties registered under their names belong to them.  

Israel recognizes the Bedouins as citizens but does not recognize some of their claims to lands they do not have the title deed as proof of ownership. 

Israel is not an apartheid state and not even close to one.

Bedouins who could prove ownership of land have registered in the land registry. Contrary to Yiftachel and Aburabia claims, those who have not proved ownership have no rights to the land and should not build illegally. They must obey Israeli law. The case of al-Araqib is a prime example of such illegal behavior. The al-Uqbi tribe, the claimants, demanded the ownership of 1000 dunams in the Israeli courts. Prof. Yiftachel was their key expert witness. They could not prove they cultivated a thousand dunams, therefore, their cases were dismissed. Still, they erected illegal dwellings ignoring the court order. The Israeli police demolished Al Araqib for the 196th time, as of December 2021. Neither Yiftachel nor Aburabia condemned such illegal behavior.

As for the Jewish claims to the land, Yiftachel and Aburabia are wrong. The Jews were promised by 50 states in 1922 a national home in Palestine due to the historical connection.

The League of Nations appointed Britain to a mandate over Palestine to establish the Jewish people’s national home at the Ottoman Empire’s demise.  On 12 August 1922, the League of Nations approved the Mandate for Palestine, stating that, “Whereas the Principal Allied Powers have agreed, for the purpose of giving effect to the provisions of Article 22 of the Covenant of the League of Nations, to entrust to a Mandatory selected by the said Powers the administration of the territory of Palestine, which formerly belonged to the Turkish Empire, within such boundaries as may be fixed by them; and Whereas the Principal Allied Powers have also agreed that the Mandatory should be responsible for putting into effect the declaration originally made on November 2nd, 1917, by the Government of His Britannic Majesty, and adopted by the said Powers, in favor of the establishment in Palestine of a national home for the Jewish people, it being clearly understood that nothing should be done which might prejudice the civil and religious rights of existing non-Jewish communities in Palestine, or the rights and political status enjoyed by Jews in any other country; and Whereas recognition has thereby been given to the historical connection of the Jewish people with Palestine and to the grounds for reconstituting their national home in that country… The Mandatory shall be responsible for placing the country under such political, administrative and economic conditions as will secure the establishment of the Jewish national home, as laid down in the preamble, and the development of self-governing institutions, and also for safeguarding the civil and religious rights of all the inhabitants of Palestine, irrespective of race and religion.”

The League of Nations document also stated that “An appropriate Jewish agency shall be recognized as a public body for the purpose of advising and co-operating with the Administration of Palestine in such economic, social and other matters as may affect the establishment of the Jewish national home and the interests of the Jewish population in Palestine, and, subject always to the control of the Administration, to assist and take part in the development of the country… The Zionist Organization, so long as its organization and constitution are in the opinion of the Mandatory appropriate, shall be recognized as such agency. It shall take steps in consultation with His Britannic Majesty’s Government to secure the co-operation of all Jews who are willing to assist in the establishment of the Jewish national home. The Administration of Palestine, while ensuring that the rights and position of other sections of the population are not prejudiced, shall facilitate Jewish immigration under suitable conditions and shall encourage, in co-operation with the Jewish agency referred to in Article 4, close settlement by Jews on the land, including State lands and waste lands not required for public purposes… The Administration of Palestine shall be responsible for enacting a nationality law. There shall be included in this law provisions framed so as to facilitate the acquisition of Palestinian citizenship by Jews who take up their permanent residence in Palestine.”  

Interestingly, Yiftachel recently disclosed that he had been influenced as a doctoral student by his mentor, Dr. Hubert Law-Yone from the Technion.  Now retired, Law-Yone (who is a Burmese) is critical of Israeli policies. For example, A 2002 B’Tselem report titled “Land Grab: Israel’s Settlement Policy in the West Bank,” thanks Law-Yone for his assistance in preparing the report. The report claims “that the settlement enterprise in the Occupied Territories has created a system of legally sanctioned separation based on discrimination that has, perhaps, no parallel anywhere in the world since the apartheid regime in South Africa.” 

Yiftachel, Law-Yone, and all their critical neo-Marxist cohorts opposed the government initiative to settle land disputes with the Bedouins in the Negev that aimed to move them into proper houses from the shacks they currently live in. The Bedouins rejected these offers and instead began to riot to show solidarity with the Palestinians.   As a result, the Bedouins of the Negev reject any land settlement and systematically demand more than is offered to them.

As stated above, since Palestine is the Jewish national home, self-governing institutions are established for all Jews and non-Jews alike. The Bedouins are expected to adhere to these institutions and obey the law.  As parts of the Bedouin community are lawless and crime is skyrocketing. Yiftachel and Aburabia contribute to the chaos by providing falsified information.

More to the point, Yiftachel was behind the recent report of BT’selem claiming Israel is an apartheid state.  For Yiftachel, every dysfunctionality in the Arab community is further proof of the apartheid nature of the state.

Both Yiftachel and Aburabia abuse the Israeli academic system by providing falsehoods instead of scholarships. The Israeli taxpayers who pay for the academic institutions deserve better value for their money.

References

https://urbanologia.tau.ac.il/the-dilemma-of-the-dark-side-of-planning/

פרופ’ אורן יפתחאל מגיב לפרופ’ יוברט לו יון ומספר כיצד השפיע עליו המפגש עימו עוד כשהיה סטונדט לדוקטרט ונחשף לעמדתו הביקורתית. כיום הוא מבין את מקצועות המרחב כזירה של מאבק בין ‘צדדים אפלים’ ל’צדדים מוארים‘, סוקר את השלבים בהתפתחות המחשבה על צדק מרחבי ומציע את הקריאה שלו לתכנון טוב יותר
המרחב השקוף
אוקטובר 1988: שיחה בזמן סיור בכפר הלא מוכר (דה-אז) דמיידה במרכז הגליל כחלק מעבודת שדה עם יוברט לו-יון ‘ואגודת הארבעים’  על הכנת תכנית אב לכפרים הלא מוכרים בגליל.
אורן: “כל היישוב כאן זה פחונים וצריפונים? אין כביש? אין בית ספר? אין שלטים?”
יוברט: “כן, זה עד היום ‘התכנון’ למקומות האלה”
אורן: “כישלון מחפיר, המתכננים כנראה לא למדו בטכניון”.
יוברט: “לא לא אורן, זאת דווקא הצלחה של התכנון, אתה צריך לחשוב מחדש על מהות התכנון…”
אורן: “כלומר, התכנון מועל בתפקידו?”
יוברט: “לא אורן, מה שאתה רואה כאן הוא בעצם תפקידו של התכנון, להפוך את המרחב, כשהוא מעוניין בכך, לשקוף, ואת תושביו לתלויים ומוחלשים,. כמו שמלמד אותנו מישל פוקו (‘מי זה? אני שואל את עצמי…’), צריך תמיד לבדוק את תרגום הכוח למרחב ולא את המילים היפות של קובעי המדיניות .. צריך להבין שמהתכנון לא יצמח שינוי, אלא מפעולות חברתיות ופוליטיות גם של אנשי מקצוע “.1
בתור דוקטורנט לתכנון בטכניון, ואחרי מספר שנים של עבודה במשרדי ורשויות תכנון שהציגו עצמן תמיד ככאלה השואפות לטוב הציבורי ‘לכולם’, השיחה הזאת טלטלה אותי. האם אני במקצוע הלא נכון?
רצתי מייד לקרוא את פוקו ועוד ערימה של מאמרים שפרופ’ יוברט לו-יון רשם לנו בקורס הבלתי נשכח “תכנון ואידיאולוגיה”.  אינני בטוח שהבנתי אותם אז במלואם, אבל הם פתחו לי חלונות לעולם חשוב מאין כמוהו –ניתוח הממשק בין כוח ותכנון — העולם שמעבר לכוונות, מטרות והצהרות אידיאולוגיות מכובסות על העתיד הרצוי.
כעבור כשנה נסענו, מספר סטודנטים, עם לו-יון לישיבת הוועדה המחוזית אליה הוזמן, לאישור תכנית המתאר של מחוז הצפון. באקט מחאתי  לו-יון תקע על המפה הגדולה שעל הקיר עשרות סיכות צבעוניות.
יו”ר הוועדה: “פרופ’ לו-יון, מהן הסיכות האלה?”
יוברט: אלה היישובים הקיימים שהתוכנית מוחקת”
יו”ר: “אני מבקש שתוריד אותן מיד. צריך לקיים כאן דיון מקצועי.”
יוברט: “לא אני צריך להוריד, אלא אתם צריכים לכלול את היישובים בתוכנית…”
הישוב הבדואי דמיידה בגליל שהוכר במסגרת הפעולות שיזמה ‘אגודת הארבעים’ בסיוע לו-יון
++
הפעולות שיזמה ‘אגודת הארבעים’ בסיוע לו-יון, אכן הובילו, יחד עם חילופי שלטון במדינה, להכרה בכפרים. זהו אחד ההישגים המשמעותיים עד היום של חברה אזרחית במערכת התכנון הישראלית.
‘המשקפיים’ שהעניקו לי ניתוחיו של לו-יון, אפשרו לי גם להבין אחרת מאבקים ופרויקטים בהם הייתי מעורב באופן אחר, כמו גם את תפקידו של התכנון כפי שהוא מתקיים ‘בשטח’ ולא בתיאוריות המופשטות.  לימים גם ניסחתי את התובנות החדשות בעבודותיי על ‘הצד האפל’ של התכנון, שסללו דרך – יחד עם מספר עמיתים ביקורתיים – לדיון חדש לגמרי בספרות התכנונית.
המרחב האפל (והמואר?)
מאי 2021: בהרצאה המוקלטת כאן מציע יוברט לו-יון מבט-על על השיח התכנוני של תחילת המאה ה-21. הניתוח מישיר עיניים ‘לדילמות התכנוניות העמוקות’, הכרוכות בהתפוררות לדבריו של המחשבה והמעשה התכנוניים במספר ממדים. ראשית, ‘הסיפור’ האופטימי שמספרים לעצמם המתכננים על תפקידם בחברה הולך ומאבד מאמינותו, הן בעולם הגדול, והן במרחב הישראלי-פלסטיני.
שנית, טוען לו-יון, נסדקת בתקופה האחרונה גם האפיסטמולוגיה הבסיסית, כלומר הדרך לאגור וליישם ידע, של ‘מקצועני המרחב’ (אדריכלים, גיאוגרפים, מעצבים וכו’). אובדנים אלו נובעים מהסנגוריה הברורה של התכנון ‘בשטח’ על מוקדי כוח דכאניים בחברה, כגון הון בינלאומי ומקומי, עליונות אתנו-לאומית, ולאחרונה גם ‘לוחמת משפט’ (lawfare) דרכה פוגעים מוקדי הכוח בזכויות של קבוצות מוחלשות, מיעוטים ופריפריות.2
את הרעיונות האלו של יוברט לו יון אנסה לחבר ‘על קצה המזלג’ להתפתחות המחשבה התכנונית ולאתגרי העתיד של חוקרי ופעילי התכנון, כלומר – האתגרים שלנו. הרעיונות שאציג להלן נכתבו מתוך הערכה עמוקה לתרומתו הראשונית והגדולה של יוברט לו-יון בפיתוח הפרדיגמה הביקורתית בחקר התכנון בארץ בכלל, ולעבודתי בפרט.
המרחב הצודק?
מה המקום החברתי של התכנון העירוני? מעבר להשראה ששאבתי מהתורה שהרביץ בי לו-יון, התפתחה ביננו גם מחלוקת שאלה זו. בעוד לו-יון המשיך להעמיק את הביקורת על תפקידו המבני, הכמעט דטרמיניסטי של התכנון כחלק ממנגנוני הדיכוי בחברה, התובנות שאני פיתחתי במהלך שנת עבודתי סייעו לי להבינו כזירה של מאבק. בזירה זאת, להבנתי, מקצועני המרחב ממלאים תפקיד מרכזי בעיצוב מטרות “אפלות” ו”מוארות”, פרקטיקות וחוקים מרחביים, הנעים גם הם במנעד רחב של תוצאות ממשיות, בין ‘צדדים אפלים’ ל’צדדים מוארים’. המאבק הזה, על תוצאותיו המורכבות, מציפים את השאלה התכנונית החשובה – ‘מהו המרחב הצודק?’ האם זו מטרה? תהליך? מקום? האם וכיצד נוכל להפוך עוולות וסכסוכים מרחביים לתהליך של תיקון חומרי, פוליטי ותהליכי? רבים מהכותבים המרכזיים בספרות התכנונית והאורבנית נדרשו גם הם לדילמה עליה מצביע לו-יון, וכך פיתחו במקביל תובנות משמעותיות לגבי כינונה של ‘העיר הצודקת’.
במשיכות מכחול גסות, ניתן לחלק את התפתחות שיח הצדק המרחבי לארבעה שלבים עיקריים – מבני-מרקסיאני, ליברלי, פוסט קולוניאלי, וניאו-קולוניאלי. סוגי השיח היו דומיננטיים בתקופות מסוימות אם כי גם כיום רוב סוגי השיח מתקיימים במקביל.
שלב ראשון –מרקסיאני. אחרי עשורים ארוכים בהן השיח והמחקר התכנוני לקחו כמובן מאליו את השפעותיו החיוביות של התכנון העירוני על החברה, החל בשנות השבעים והשמונים של המאה הקודמת צמח שיח ביקורתי, שאתגר הנחות אלה. בשלב הראשון התיאוריות המרכזיות בשיח התמקדו בכלכלה הפוליטית, ובעיקר בפרשנות המרקסיאנית, כלומר בכוח העצום ובעוולות הנלוות של הקפיטליזם והנאו-ליברליזם, המייצרים מנגנוני צבירת ההון וההפרטה ואיתם ניצול וריבוד המעמדי, ופערים חברתיים מהגדולים בהיסטוריה.  את השיח הובילו הוגים כמנואל קאסטלס, פיטר מרקוזה, דיוויד הארווי, ויותר מאוחר סוזן פיינסטיין, ג’יימי פק וניל ברנר. תפיסתם לגבי המרחב הצודק הייתי מבנית – ‘הרע הגדול’ הוא הקפיטליזם, והתכנון הנכון מנטרל ככל האפשר את היגיון ההון, הרווח, הפיתוח והגלובליזציה, למען מטרות של חלוקה לפי צרכים, תחת עיקרון העל – שוויון. חברתי
שלב שני–פוסט קולוניאלי. בשנות השמונים והתשעים החל לעלות גל נוסף של כתיבה אשר טען שהעוולות בעיצוב המרכז לא מצטמצמות למנגנוני הקפיטליסטיים, אלא נובעים ‘ממשטר הזהויות’, בו אוכלוסיות מסוימות (בדרך כלל לבנות ופטריארכליות) משתלטות על משאבים וכוח, ורותמות את פיתוח המרחב לטובת האינטרסים שלהן.
היגיון של משטר הזהות המפלים נמשך גם בתקופה הפוסט-קולוניאלית, בקולוניות לשעבר כמו גם במאות מיליוני המהגרים מהדרום והמזרח הגלובאליים לצפון העשיר. חוקרים כגון ליאוני סנדרקוק, אש אמין ואייריס מאריון יאנג הובילו כתיבה חדשה ומאתגרת המתבססת על תורותיהם של הוגים כגון אנטוניו גראמשי, מישל פוקו ואדוארד סעיד.  חוקרים אלה הניפו את דגל ההכרה בזהויות אתניות, תרבותיות, מגדריות ומינית כאופק רצוי לעיצוב המרחב והחברה.  
שלב שלישי – ליברלי. בשלהי המאה ה-20 החל לעלות גל אחר, ליברלי יותר, שחיפש את הנתיב לעיר הצודקת דרך שכלולם של תהליכים דמוקרטיים בעיצוב העיר. הוגים מרכזיים כמו פאטסי הילי, ג’ון פורסטר, ג’ין הילייר או ג’ודי אינס הסיטו את העדשה מהתבוננות בעוולות חומריות או זהותיות. במקום זאת, ובהתבסס על הוגים ליברליים כמו יורגן האברמאס ובנג’מין בארבר, התמקדו בניסיון להשיג ‘צדק תהליכי’, תוך התמקדות באופני קבלת ההחלטות, שיתוף הציבור, עולמם הערכי של המתכננים וחיבורם למסגרות של דמוקרטיה מתדיינת. ‘תהליך נכון יוביל לתוצאות נכונות’, הייתה הנחת העבודה של הוגים אלה, כאשר הדגל המרכזי הוא ‘עיר דמוקרטית’.  עם זאת, נראה שאשליית הדמוקרטיה התכנונית התנפצה שוב ושוב על סלעי המציאות, בה תהליכי הפיתוח הדורסניים ומשטרי הזהויות ידעו לתמרן סביב תהליכים ‘דמוקרטיים’ כדי להשיג את מטרותיהן.
שלב רביעי – נאו-קולוניאלי: מציאות עיקשת זו של פערים, עוולות, אלימות ועקירות, חלקן הגדול בחסות מערכת התכנון המרחבי, הובילה לגל רביעי של כתיבה ביקורתית  בעשור האחרון המגיעה בעיקר מהשוליים המתרחבים של הדיון התכנוני. תוך התנגדות לדומיננטיות ארוכת השנים של תיאוריות אוניברסליות כביכול המגיעות מהאקדמיה הדומיננטית של הצפון-מערב הגלובאלי. קולות אלה, הכוללים הוגים כמו וונסה וואטסון, אנאניה רוי, ליבי פורטר, אדגר פיטרסה או טרזה קלדירה, הממקמים את נקודת המבט שלהם בפריפריה הגלובלית, ומדגישים את שיבתם של מצבים קולוניאליים של הדרה, מהותנות, הפרדה וניצול, כגורמים מרכזיים בעיצוב העיר במאה ה-21.
בתהליך זה, דפוסים של  ‘נפרד ולא שווה’ שאפיינו חברות קולוניאליות וגזעניות בעבר עוברים עיור ולאחרונה גם דיגיטציה, ומעצבים מחדש את האזרחות, המרחב והחברה האנושית. תהליכים אלה הרחיבו את ‘המרחב האפור’  — מצב של קיום לימינאלי בין החוקי לנפשע, בין המוכר לשקוף — בו מתגוררים כיום למעלה ממיליארד איש בערי העולם בפאבלות או גטאות למיניהן, כאשר הם אינם מוכללים בעיר ובשירותיה באופן מלא, אך גם לא מגורשים ממנה.  
ירושלים, דובאי או ערי הענק של דרום אמריקה, אפריקה, סין והודו מציגות אופנים שונים לחזרתם של דפוסים קולוניאליים לעיר העכשווית, המשיתה דפוסים של ‘אפרטהייד תכנוני’ על תושביה ומעמידה אותם בסכנה נמשכת של דחיקה ועקירה. הדגל המרכזי המונף על-ידי הוגים אלה כדי להפוך את העוול לצדק, הוא לדמיין וליישם ממדים שונים של ‘דה-קולוניזציה’ בעיר העכשווית. כלומר, לדמיין שינוי עומק רב-ממדי  (חומרי, פוליטי, זהותי, מגדרי) בו מתבטלים דפוסי העליונות המובנית של אוכלוסיות פריווילגיות ומשאבי החברה מתחלקים מחדש באופן הוגן.  
הסלאמס של דובאי רחוקים מדימוי וחיי היוקרה של העיר (Sam Litvin, Flickr)בדובאי מתהווה ‘אפרטהייד תכנוני’ (Christopher, Flickr)
המרחב העתידי – להאיר את השקוף?
כיצד מחברים את הדילמה עליה מצביע לו-יון עם הידע הרב שהצטבר על העיר הצודקת? כיצד קושרים את הניתוח המבני עם המאבק להפוך דיכוי וניצול לשחרור ושוויון? האם המלחמה המשפטית והתכנונית בעקרונות הצדק עליה מצביע לו-יון מחויבת המציאות? האם בישראל/פלסטין הצד האפל של התכנון בהכרח גובר על צדדיו האחרים?
לטעמי, הידע הרב שהצטבר על רצף העוול-צדק המרחביים מציע מוצא מהדילמה –  סנכרון הידע התכנוני  – התאורטי והמקצועי —  עם המאבק לכינונו של מרחב צודק. אם כך, המוצא מהדילמה מחייב את המתכננים ‘לבחור צד’ ולקדם את המטרה העליונה לשמה נוצר התכנון כהתערבות ציבורית במרחב  – שיפור, קידום, שגשוג וייצוב המרחב האנושי. כלומר, הפיכת המרחב השקוף של דמיידה אותו פגשנו בתחילת החיבור, למרחב מואר ונוכח.
אכן, המרחב הישראלי/פלסטיני, כפי שמציין לו-יון בהרצאתו, מלא בעוולות מרחביות, על בסיס כלכלי, אידיאולוגי וזהותי, שנוצרו בידי מדיניות תכנון, קרקע והתיישבות מייהדת של חלקים גדולים מהמרחב הפלסטיני. דפוסים אלה בולטים גם בערים הדו-לאומיות בישראל – במיוחד יפו, לוד ועכו, שהפכו ל’אזור ספר’ חדש בשנים האחרונות במעשה הייהוד, והתפרצו באלימות בשבועות האחרונים.
אך באותו מרחב ישראלי/פלסטיני מתקיימים מהלכים כמו תכנית ‘אגודת ה-40′, תכנית אותה הוביל לו-יון ושסייעה בהכרה בכל הכפרים שהוגדרו כ’לא חוקיים’ בגליל. כך גם ‘תוכנית האב לכפרים הלא מוכרים בנגב‘, בהכנתה הייתי שותף לפני מספר שנים, והיא עדיין מהווה דגל במאבקם של עשרות אלפי אזרחים להכרה תכנונית. מהלכים אלה מעידים על פוטנציאל מתמשך לגלות, לחזק ולהרחיב את ‘הצד המואר’ והצודק של התכנון. תפיסה זו מנוסחת בהרחבה בעבודות בהן השתתפתי לאחרונה עם החוקרים.ות ארז צפדיה, אחמד אמארה, סנדי קדר,  נופר אבני, רני מנדלבאום והודא אבו-זייד.3
אין בקריאה זו המלצה לקידום מודל אוניברסלי של מרחב צודק, אלא שאיפה להטיית חרטום הספינה משיוט כביכול ניטרלי, רציונלי ואובייקטיבי בין מוקדי הכוח (כפי שרוב המתכננים מייצגים את כוונותיהם כיום), אל עבר המים הלא שקטים והעמוקים של קידום העיר הצודקת. שיוט זה איננו קל, והדיון בשאלה ‘מהו צדק מרחבי’ יוביל בוודאי לסערות לא מעטות, אך הוא גם ינווט את ההגות והעשייה התכנונית בכיוון הנכון – מוסרית ופרגמטית. זאת כיוון שמרחבים המקובלים על יושביהם כצודקים יותר, נוטים להיות יציבים ומשגשגים. כך יהיה ברור יותר גם לעוסקים ולעוסקות בעיצוב המרחב מהי כוונתו החברתית של התכנון. הפער הבלתי נסבל אותו חשף בפניי יוברט לו-יון בעבודותיו לאורך השנים, צריך להזכיר לנו כי לתכנון תפקיד ברור מוסרי, ולכן פוליטי – לנווט את המרחב האנושי מהצד האפל לעבר הצד המואר, בתוך עולם מורכב, כפי שמנסחות בדייקנות מילותיו של המשורר —  
לילה
אלי אליהו
אנחנו כעת על חציו האפל
של הכוכב, בִיתי. ואולי בכול זאת
אפשר לומר דבר על העולם –
חציו אפל וחציו מואר.
גם האדם, בִיתי,
כך גם האדם.
 —————————–1. שחזור מזיכרון אישי 2. לרשימה של פרופ’ ארז צפדיה שמרחיבה את הרעיון של לו יון על התכנון כלוחמת משפט ↩ עבודות אלה מוצגות בין היתר בספרי – יפתחאל, א. 2021. עוצמה ואדמה: מאתנוקרטיה לאפרטהייד זוחל בישראל/פלסטין’, תל-אביב: רסלינג.
3. עבודות אלה מוצגות בין היתר בספרי – יפתחאל, א. 2021. עוצמה ואדמה: מאתנוקרטיה לאפרטהייד זוחל בישראל/פלסטין’, תל-אביב: רסלינג.

אורן יפתחאלמלמד גיאוגרפיה פוליטית, תכנון עירוני ומדיניות ציבורית באוניברסיטת בן-גוריון בנגב, באר שבע. עומד בראש הקתדרה ללימודים עירוניים, ובראש המחלקה ללימודים רב-תחומיים. מחקריו עוסקים בקשר בין זהות, כוח ומרחב, ובהשלכותיהם החברתיות של תיכנון, התיישבות ופיתוח וכמו כן בהשוואה בינלאומית של ערים ומשטרים, תוך התמקדות בישראל/פלסטין

בסיוע מועצת הפיס לתרבות ולאמנות המעבדה לעיצוב עירוני, החוג לגאוגרפיה וסביבת האדם. אוניברסיטת תל אביב Urbanologia by LCUD is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International License

BDS Fail: HUJ Palestinian Students Urged Princeton Neuroscientist to Withdraw from Seminar

13.01.22

Editorial Note 

Dr. Ahmed El Hady, an Egyptian postdoctoral fellow of Neuroscience at Princeton University, has lectured last week on Zoom to the Edmond and Lily Safra Center for Brain Sciences (ELSC) at the Hebrew University. The lecture was titled “Functional ultrasound imaging during behavior,” explaining that “Functional ultrasound imaging (fUSi) is an emerging technique that allows us to measure neural activity from medial frontal regions down to subcortical structures up to a depth of 20 mm.”  

However, the Palestinian Campaign for the Academic and Cultural Boycott of Israel (PACBI) used the opportunity to harass Dr. El-Hady and urged him not to participate in the lecture.  PACBI was notified of the lecture by Palestinian students at the Hebrew University. PACBI wrote, “We echo the call from Palestinian students at Hebrew University urgently requesting that you cancel your participation in the ‘ELSC Seminar Series’ this Thursday. As the student activists noted, Israeli universities, including Hebrew University, have long played a willing and active role in planning, implementing and justifying Israel’s decades-old regime of occupation, settler-colonialism and apartheid.”  

Worth noting that in this case, the BDS efforts failed. Elhady has also collaborated with the Hebrew University scientists before. In 2014, El Hady, then at the Max Planck Campus, Göttingen, Germany, co-organized a workshop named “NeuroBridges,” aimed to “serve as a bridge between experimental and theoretical neuroscientists addressing system-level questions.” By holding such workshops, they were seeking to establish many new collaborations. He and his co-organizers wrote of NeuroBridges, that “we believe that scientists have a responsibility, which goes beyond their own research. Scientists should promote common understanding between people from different nations. Therefore, the workshop will bring together Israeli, German and Arab scientists.”  Furthermore, they wrote, “We believe that such scientific collaborations can lead to personal relations, and in the long run may alleviate the political distress between Arabs and Israelis. We foresee this event as the first workshop in an annual tradition aimed at fostering scientific collaborations between Israeli and Arab neuroscientists.” His Israeli co-organizer was Yonatan Loewenstein from the Hebrew University. 

In September 2015, the following year, the academic journal Science reported an event that twenty neuroscientists from Israel and the Arab world gathered for dinner at a Left Bank bistro in Paris. The scientists assembled at the Paris Descartes University for a 3-day meeting that sought to foster relationships across the political and religious divide in the Middle East as part of NeuroBridges. It grew from the friendship between El Hady and his Israeli colleague Loewenstein of the ELSC at the Hebrew University.

After they met in Germany, Loewenstein invited El Hady to an ELSC retreat in Ein Gedi, an oasis near the Dead Sea in Israel. During a hike in the area, they agreed that “science could bring more researchers together, both professionally and personally.” 

However, most of the Arab participants, like El Hady, live in Western countries, to which El Hady said, “The mood in most Arab countries is fervently anti-Israel, and scientists there could face a political price for attending NeuroBridges.” Adding that since “Academics are the most reasonable people… If we cut off contact with them, we lose the last resort.”

Worth noting that Palestinian scientists refused to participate in NeuroBridges. 

Although Palestinian students in Israel, like all other Israeli students, have the right to academic freedom, advocating for BDS is illegal under the 2011 Israeli Boycott Law, which the Knesset enacted:

“Bill for prevention of damage to the State of Israel through boycott – 2011,” defines that “1. In this law, “boycott of the State of Israel” – deliberate avoidance of economic, cultural or academic ties with a person or other party, solely for reason of his/her/its relation to the state of Israel, to any of its institutions or to any area under its control, which could cause them economic, cultural or academic harm. Boycott – a civil wrong 2. (a) Anyone who publishes a public call for a boycott of the state of Israel, and its content and circumstances may reasonably be expected to lead to a boycott, and the publisher is aware of this possibility – is committing a civil wrong and the Law of Tort [new version] shall apply to him/her.”

The Hebrew University should be aware of the BDS action of its students. 

Clearly, the academy is the most active arena for delegitimizing Israel, and the Israeli academic authorities should help fight the delegitimization. 

As for the Palestinians, by boycotting all things Israeli, they cut themselves off the thriving global academic community in which Israel has a prominent role.

References:

https://elsc.huji.ac.il/events-and-outreach/elsc-seminars/elsc-seminar-series/functional-ultrasound-imaging-during-behavior/

ELSC Seminar Series

Home » ELSC Seminar Series » Functional ultrasound imaging during behavior

Dr. Ahmed El-Hady

Princeton University
Princeton Neuroscience Institute

Functional ultrasound imaging during behavior

The dream of a systems neuroscientist is to be able to unravel neural mechanisms that give rise to behavior. It is increasingly appreciated that behavior involves the concerted distributed activity of multiple brain regions so the focus on single or few brain areas might hinder our understanding. There have been quite a few technological advancements in this domain. Functional ultrasound imaging (fUSi) is an emerging technique that allows us to measure neural activity from medial frontal regions down to subcortical structures up to a depth of 20 mm. It is a method for imaging transient changes in cerebral blood volume (CBV), which are proportional to neural activity changes. It has excellent spatial resolution (~100 μm X 100 μm X 400 μm); its temporal resolution can go down to 100 milliseconds. In this talk, I will present its use in two model systems:  marmoset monkeys and rats. In marmoset monkeys, we used it to delineate a social – vocal network involved in vocal communication while in rats, we used it to gain insights into brain wide networks involved in evidence accumulation based decision making. fUSi has the potential to provide an unprecedented access to brain wide dynamics in freely moving animals performing complex behavioral tasks.

Seminar Date & Time:

January 6th, 202214:30 (IST)Notifications and Zoom links are sent to ELSC seminar mailing list, subscribe here.
Providing full name is mandatory for joining Zoom. 

==========================================
https://bdsmovement.net/news/palestinians-urge-dr-ahmed-el-hady-withdraw-from-hebrew-university-seminar
Palestinians Urge Dr. Ahmed El-Hady to Withdraw from Hebrew University Seminar January 5, 2022 / By Palestinian Campaign for the Academic and Cultural Boycott of Israel (PACBI) /

Following the letter from Palestinian Students at Hebrew University, the Palestinian Campaign for the Academic and Cultural Boycott of Israel (PACBI) urges Dr. El-Hady not to participate in event at complicit Israeli university partially built on stolen Palestinian land in occupied East Jerusalem.

Dear Dr. Ahmed El-Hady,

We are writing from the Palestinian Campaign for the Academic and Cultural Boycott of Israel (PACBI), a founding member of the Palestinian Boycott, Divestment and Sanctions (BDS) National Committee, the largest coalition in Palestinian civil society. 

We echo the call from Palestinian students at Hebrew University urgently requesting that you cancel your participation in the “ELSC Seminar Series” this Thursday.

As the student activists noted, Israeli universities, including Hebrew University, have long played a willing and active role in planning, implementing and justifying Israel’s decades-old regime of occupation, settler-colonialism and apartheid. 

Hebrew University is partially built on stolen Palestinian  land in occupied East Jerusalem, in violation of international law. The university has joined legal actions to forcibly displace Palestinians to allow for campus expansion.

Hebrew University also hosts the Israeli military’s Havatzalot program, effectively a military base on campus that includes combat training. 

Hebrew University has also hosted recruitment events for Shin Bet, Israel’s notorious domestic intelligence agency. Shin Bet has been condemned by the UN Committee Against Torture over its use of violent interrogation tactics on Palestinians. 

The Israeli organization Academia for Equality has documented Hebrew University’s active cooperation with Israeli occupation forces subjecting residents of the adjoining Palestinian neighborhood of Issawiya in occupied East Jerusalem to “unrelenting and unfathomable police brutality,” including lending its rooftops to Israeli police for mass surveillance of Palestinians.  

As you may know, in 2021, Human Rights Watch and Israel’s leading human rights organization B’Tselem issued separate reports condemning Israel as an apartheid state against the entire Palestinian people. Israeli universities, including Hebrew University, are a crucial part of Israel’s apartheid apparatus.

Regardless of your intentions, participating in the ELSC Seminar Series at Hebrew University would help whitewash Israel’s apartheid regime and its grave violations of international law, including war crimes, gradual ethnic cleansing, home demolitions, expanding settlement enterprise, and administrative detention of political prisoners. 

At a time when academics and academic associations worldwide are increasingly refraining from any engagement with Israel’s universities, including Hebrew University, for their deep, decades-long complicity in apartheid and settler-colonialism, we ask you not to be a part of the ongoing normalization of these complicit institutions. We call on you to urgently withdraw from this seminar series.

Sincerely,

Palestinian Campaign for the Academic and Cultural Boycott of Israel (PACBI)

========================================================
https://www.facebook.com/A4PConcordia/posts/1528313957548961

Academics for Palestine – Concordia

5 January at 17:42  · 

Boycott, Divestment and Sanctions (BDS) Movement

5 January at 17:18 

We echo the call from Palestinian students urging Dr. Ahmed El Hady to withdraw from Hebrew University seminar series.Hebrew University is partially built on stolen Palestinian land in occupied East Jerusalem, hosts an Israeli military base on campus and actively cooperates with Israeli forces oppressing Palestinians. Regardless of intentions, participating in the seminar series at Hebrew University would help whitewash Israel’s apartheid regime and its grave violations of international law, including war crimes, gradual ethnic cleansing, home demolitions, expanding settlement enterprise, and administrative detention of political prisoners. https://loom.ly/d0Dddsk
=======================================================

https://pni.princeton.edu/news/pni-postdoc-ahmed-el-hadys-neurobridges-program-brings-arab-and-israeli-neuroscientists-together

PostedJun 032016

PNI Postdoc Ahmed El Hady’s “NeuroBridges” program brings Arab and Israeli neuroscientists together

NeuroBridges is a series of meetings that brings together brain scientists from Israel and the Arab world in hopes of fostering relationships across the political and religious fault lines that divide the Middle East. It grew from the friendship between Ahmed El Hady, an Egyptian neuroscientist at Princeton University, and his Israeli colleague Yonatan Loewenstein of the Edmond & Lily Safra Center for Brain Sciences at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem. Science sat in on the second NeuroBridges meeting, held in September 2015 in Paris, where discussions about the Middle East were animated but the mood was friendly. 

=================================================================

https://www.science.org/doi/full/10.1126/science.352.6290.1161

Gatherings aim to bridge a wide divide

MARTIN ENSERINKSCIENCE • 3 Jun 2016 • Vol 352, Issue 6290 • p. 1161

When 20 neuroscientists from Israel and the Arab world gathered for dinner at a Left
Bank bistro here in September 2015, it didn’t take long for the conversation to turn
from duck breast to the Middle East—and for the temperature to rise. The researchers,
including two Palestinians, bickered over the Iran nuclear deal, the war in Syria,
and, of course, the Israeli-Palestinian conflict. “The two-state solution is dead!” one
Arab scientist argued. “We need to think about a one-state model.” “That will never
work!” an Israeli colleague shot back. As the evening wore on, the debates got more
animated and louder.
The scientists didn’t solve any problems that night, but at least they were talking—
and that was the point.
They had assembled at Paris Descartes University for a 3-day meeting that sought
to foster relationships across the political and religious fault lines dividing the
Middle East. NeuroBridges, as it’s called, is one of several science diplomacy efforts
focused on the region; the most ambitious is SESAME, a synchrotron light source
in Jordan expected to come online in 2017 that involves nine unlikely bedfellows,
including Turkey, Israel, the Palestinian National Authority, Iran, and Pakistan.
NeuroBridges grew from the friendship between Ahmed El Hady, an Egyptian
neuroscientist at Princeton University, and his Israeli colleague Yonatan
Loewenstein of the Edmond & Lily Safra Center for
Brain Sciences (ELSC) at the Hebrew University of
Jerusalem. After they met in Germany, Loewenstein
invited El Hady to an ELSC retreat in Ein Gedi, an
oasis near the Dead Sea in Israel. During a hike, the
duo agreed that science could bring more researchers
together, both professionally and personally. The
first NeuroBridges, later that year at the University
of Göttingen in Germany, came at an awkward time:
3 weeks into the 2014 Gaza war.
Science sat in on the 2015 successor, in a monumental Parisian university hall
adorned with tapestries woven for King Louis XIV. After an unusual preamble describing
their own geographical, religious, or political background, attendees presented
their work, which spanned a range of neuroscience areas. The mood was friendly.
“We really need opportunities for dialogue like this,” says Mehdi Khamassi, a
French-Tunisian researcher at the Pierre and Marie Curie University in Paris, who
noted that relations between Arabs and Jews in France have deteriorated rapidly:
“We seem to have imported the conflict from the Middle East.” (The meeting took
place 2 months before the 13 November 2015 terrorist attacks here.)
Like El Hady, almost all of the Arab participants live and work in Western countries.
The mood in most Arab countries is fervently anti-Israel, and scientists there
could face a political price for attending NeuroBridges, El Hady says. Mohammad
Herzallah, who heads the Palestinian Neuroscience Initiative, has declined an
invitation twice (see main story, p. 1158).
Critics of Israel’s occupation of the Palestinian Territories say that meetings
like NeuroBridges fail to address the root issue. A mostly scientific meeting that
doesn’t focus on problems faced by Palestinian academics contributes to the
“normalization” of the occupation, says Jonathan Rosenhead, chair of the British
Committee for the Universities of Palestine in London and an advocate of an
academic boycott of Israel. El Hady disagrees. “Academics are the most reasonable
people,” he says. “If we cut off contact with them, we lose the last resort.”
This year’s NeuroBridges will be at a chateau in Burgundy, France, in September.
To reach a wider and younger audience, it will be a 10-day summer school in
computational neuroscience. Can such meetings bring peace in the Middle East
any closer? “To be honest, this is not a question that concerns me very much,”
Loewenstein says after a very long pause. “The question I ask myself is what I can
personally do to improve the situation.” 

===========================================
https://elsc.huji.ac.il/events-and-outreach/conferences/neurobridges-2014/

NeuroBridges 2014

Where

The Max Planck Campus, Göttingen, Germany, July 29-31 2014

Organizers:
Ahmed El Hady (Max Planck Institute)
Tim Gollisch (Göttingen University)
Yonatan Loewenstein (Hebrew University)

The goal of this workshop is to serve as a bridge between experimental and theoretical neuroscientists addressing system-level questions with the hope of establishing as many as possible new collaborations.

In addition to the scientific exchange goal, we believe that scientists have a responsibility, which goes beyond their own research. Scientists should promote common understanding between people from different nations. Therefore, the workshop will bring together Israeli, German and Arab scientists. We believe that such scientific collaborations can lead to personal relations, and in the long run may alleviate the political distress between Arabs and Israelis.

We foresee this event as the first workshop in an annual tradition aimed at fostering scientific collaborations between Israeli and Arab neuroscientists.
Lectures are open for the public and there is no registration fee but space is limited. Therefore, those planning to attend are kindly requested to send an email to inform the local organizer Ahmed El Hady (aelhady1 at gwdg.de).

Program (PDF)
For more information: aelhady1 at gwdg.de, yonatan at huji.ac.il

https://bio.huji.ac.il/yonatanLab/newsite/site.html

The Oded Goldreich Israel Prize Saga not Ended

05.01.22

Editorial Note

The Israel Prize Committee has petitioned the High Court the second time requesting to award the Israel Prize to Professor Oded Goldreich.  The Supreme Court held the hearing on January 4, 2022, under the new Judge, Daphne Barak-Erez, who decided to schedule a hearing on this issue on February 15, 2022.

The Israel Prize is highly prestigious.  As its homepage states: “The winners of the Israel Prize have placed a faithful stake in their work and achievements and set very high norms, a model for identification and a source of pride for all of us…”

In 2010, the Israeli State Comptroller examined the procedure of granting the award in the Annual Report.  He noted that the Israel Prize had been awarded since 1953 every year on Independence Day by the Minister of Education to “individuals who have shown special excellence and achieved remarkable results. Over the years, the award has received a national status that expresses the state’s appreciation and respect for Israeli citizens and institutions, who, in their activities in various fields, have made important contributions to society and the state.” The State Comptroller explained that the Ministry of Education is responsible for the procedures for the prize to be awarded. “The purpose of the award upon its establishment was to encourage and strengthen the hands of scholars, writers, and artists, who reside and work in Israel. The award is given in humanities and social sciences, Jewish studies, life sciences, exact sciences, arts, and culture.” The State Comptroller office examined the procedures, focusing on the administrative side of the award and not on the selection of winners or their eligibility for the award.  

Interestingly, the Comptroller found cases of conflict of interests. For example, “For about two and a half years prior to his election to the position of counsel, Adv. [Nahum] Langenthal provided salaried consulting services to ‘The Israel Democracy Institute.’ It was revealed that before awarding the prize in 2007, Adv. Langenthal and others recommended the Institute with its president as candidates for the Israel Prize for Lifetime Achievement, but the Institute did not win the prize. Ahead of the award ceremony in 2009, the Institute was again nominated for the Lifetime Achievement Award. Advocate Langenthal selected the judging panel and later participated as an observer. The committee decided to award the Institute the Lifetime Achievement Award.”

The number of scandals relating to the Israel Prize has been high throughout the years, as detailed by the Hebrew press. 

To recall, the Award Committee insisted on Goldreich even after the then Minister of Education, Yoav Gallant, raised concerns over Goldreich signing the petition that called for the European Union to refuse funding to Ariel University.

The Award Committee then petitioned the Supreme Court the first time.  Gallant’s response during the Supreme Court hearing was that “The situation in which Prof. Goldreich will receive, on the one hand, from the state the most prestigious award for contribution to the Israeli society, while on the other hand, he is promoting the affairs of a [BDS] movement that undermines the very existence of that state, is absurd and unacceptable.”

The Supreme Court stated that the petition Goldreich signed, regarding Ariel University, raises a certain difficulty, in light of the definition in section 1 of the Boycott Law, which states: “’Boycott of the State of Israel’ – intentional avoidance of economic, cultural or academic contact with a person or other entity, only because of its affiliation with the State of Israel, its institutions or an area under its control, which could harm it economically, culturally or academically.” 

The Supreme Court Judge stated that “the Boycott Law imposes tort liability and denies certain administrative benefits as specified in the law. I am correct in assuming that a call for a boycott of the State of Israel or a boycott of academia in the State of Israel, especially from the mouths of those whose prestige and achievements grew in the academy in Israel, may fall within the extreme and exceptional cases of “external” consideration. This is because it is hard to grasp that an Israeli academic, who works within the framework of the Israeli academy and enjoys its protection, will participate in the call for a boycott of the academy in Israel. Such a situation is absurd and difficult to imagine.” 

However, the Supreme Court Judge noted that Prof. Goldreich has “repeatedly stated that he does not support the BDS movement.” 

The Supreme Court Judge stated that Prof. Goldreich submitted a response stating that he: “Respects the Israel Prize and feels great pride that the Professional Committee of Judges for the Israel Prize chose him to win the prize for his contribution to the study of computer science for the year 2021[…] In the framework to defend from the defamations by the Minister, respondent five also explained he does not support the BDS movement, however, it will be immediately clarified that the respondent does not believe that his politics and political opinions, including the question of his attitude to this movement, have any relevance to the question of whether he is eligible for the Israel Prize or not. The clarification was made in light of the many articles published and because the Minister attributed to him without clarifying with him that these are not his positions, and these attributions were also published in public.”

In the end, the three Supreme Court Judges ruled in August: “Therefore, it was unanimously decided to cancel the decision of the Minister of Education to reject the recommendation of the Israel Prize Committee to award Prof. Goldreich the prize for the year 2021 in the field of mathematics and computer science research. It was also decided on the opinion of Justices N. Solberg and Y. Wilner, against the dissenting opinion of Justice Y. Amit, to return the examination of the Committee’s recommendation to the Minister of Education in order to reconsider whether to approve this recommendation.” 

In other words, the Supreme Court canceled Gallant’s decision to withdraw the candidacy of Goldreich and ordered the new Minister of Education, Yifat Shasha-Biton, to decide on this issue.  

Shasha-Biton affirmed Gallant’s decision and canceled Goldreich’s candidacy. 

As a result, the Award Committee petitioned the Supreme Court the second time. Stay tuned.

References:

https://news.walla.co.il/item/3473113
  שופטי פרס ישראל עתרו לבג”ץ נגד שרת החינוך: “מניעת הפרס מגולדרייך לא סבירה”

חברי ועדת השופטים להענקת פרס ישראל במתמטיקה ומדעי המחשב, שהמליצה להעניק את הפרס לגולדרייך, טוענים כי החלטתה של שאשא-ביטון שלא להעניק לו את הפרס בגלל תימכתו בחרם על אוניברסיטת אריאל “נגועה בשיקולים זרים”. שרת החינוך: “הוא לא יכול לקבל את הפרס”

סוניה גורודיסקי
24/11/2021

ועדת השופטים להענקת פרס ישראל במתמטיקה ומדעי המחשב עתרה היום (רביעי) לבג”ץ נגד החלטת שרת החינוך יפעת שאשא ביטון שלא להעניק את הפרס לפרופ’ עודד גולדרייך, שקרא בעבר לחרם על אוניברסיטת אריאל. נציגי שופטי ועדת הפרס האשימו בעתירה כי החלטת השרה נגועה “בשיקולים זרים וחוסר סבירות קיצוני”, וכי על כן “עומדת לפנינו עילה ברורה להתערבות החלטת השרה”.

שאשא ביטון הכריזה על החלטתה החוזרת בשבוע שעבר, ובכך הותירה על כנה את החלטתו של שר החינוך הקודם, יואב גלנט. היום היא הבהירה כי היא עומדת מאחורי ההחלטה. “אני בטוחה שבג”ץ ידחה על הסף כל עתירה נגד הכרעתי. בג”ץ העביר לידיי את ההחלטה, ואני מצפה שיכבד אותה. מי שקורא להחרים מוסד חינוכי ישראלי פוגע בחופש הביטוי והיצירה, ולא יכול לקבל את פרס ישראל”, נמסר מטעם שרת החינוך.

שאשא ביטון החליטה לא להעניק את פרס ישראל לפרופסור גולדרייך

ראשית הפרשה במרץ האחרון, אז החליטה ועדת פרס ישראל להעניק לגולדרייך את הפרס, על פועלו בנושא סיבוכיות חישובית. לאחר שגלנט גילה שגולדרייך חתום על פנייה לפרלמנט הגרמני לבטל את ההכרה בתנועת ה-BDS כתנועה אנטישמית, לצד חתימה על עצומה הקוראת להחרים את אוניברסיטת אריאל, הוא פנה לוועדת הפרס בבקשה לבחון מחדש את הענקתו.

בעקבות זאת, הוועדה עתרה לבג”ץ, ובהחלטת ביניים אישר בית המשפט לשר לבדוק תוך 30 ימים האם עמדותיו של פרופ’ גולדרייך מנוגדות לחוק למניעת פגיעה במדינה באמצעות חרם ולכן מצדיקות שלא לאשר את המלצת הוועדה. בחודש יולי הודיעה השרה שאשא-ביטון כי לא תהפוך את החלטת קודמה בתפקיד. לאחר הודעה זו כתב היועץ המשפטי לממשלה בחוות דעתו לבג”ץ כי ההחלטה לשלול את הפרס לא עומדת במבחן משפטי.

באוגוסט ביטלו שופטי בג”ץ את החלטת גלנט למנוע מגולדרייך את הפרס בעקבות חתימתו על עצומה הקוראת להחרים את אוניברסיטת אריאל, והשופטים הורו להחזיר את ההחלטה לשרה הנוכחית שאשא ביטון – שבשבוע שעבר הודיעה פעם נוספת כי לא תהפוך את ההחלטה.

“חתימתו של פרופ’ גולדרייך על העצומה הקוראת להחרים מוסד אקדמי ישראלי מהווה מקרה חריג המצדיק את הבחירה שלא להעניק למועמד את הפרס, על אף הישגיו המקצועיים הבולטים והמרשימים בתחום מחקרו”, כתבה השרה שאשא ביטון בשבוע שעבר. “כשרת החינוך ויו”ר המל”ג, אינני יכולה להעניק את פרס ישראל על הישגים אקדמיים, מרשימים ככל שיהיו, למי שקורא לחרם על מוסד אקדמי ישראלי”.

“הלכה למעשה, פרופ’ גולדרייך כאקדמאי מן השורה הראשונה, שצמח באקדמיה בישראל ונהנה מחסותה וממשאביה, ניסה למנוע קשרים אקדמיים וכלכליים, ממוסד ציבורי – אוניברסיטת אריאל – רק מחמת מיקומו הגיאוגרפי. קריאה זו לחרם על מוסד אקדמי ישראלי עולה לשיטתי כדי נסיבה ‘חיצונית’ חריגה המצדיקה לשלול ממנו את קבלת הפרס היוקרתי”, כתבה השרה בהחלטתה.

לדבריה, “בהקשר זה חשוב להדגיש, כי מטרתו של פרס ישראל לעודד יצירה ישראלית, מצוינות ומחקר. קריאה לחרם על מוסדות אקדמיים בישראל, חותרת תחת מטרה זו, שכן היא מבקשת לגדוע את היצירה, המגוון וחופש הדעות. חרם אקדמי מבקש לקבע עמדות מסוימות, ולשלול אחרות. שלילת הפרס ממי שמבקש לפגוע בחופש הדעות, מגנה למעשה על תכליותיו ומטרותיו של פרס ישראל, מגנה על האפשרות ליצור ולחדש. הענקת פרס ישראל למי שמבקש לחבל ולפגוע בעידוד היצירה והמחקר הישראלי, תחתור תחת התכליות שבהענקת הפרס. אבסורד כזה לא ניתן לקבל”.

===================================================  

https://www.makorrishon.co.il/news/439177/
היועמ”ש: לפסול את החלטת שרת החינוך לא להעניק את הפרס לפרופ’ גולדרייך

היועץ המשפטי לממשלה אביחי מנדלבליט הודיע לבג”ץ כי לעמדתו, החלטת שרת החינוך שאשא ביטון שלא להעניק לפרופסור שתמך בחרם על אונ’ אריאל אינה עומדת מבחינה משפטית

מאת   אילת כהנא  כ״ג בטבת ה׳תשפ״ב (27/12/2021 18:29) בתוך חדשות

היועץ המשפטי לממשלה ד”ר אביחי מנדלבליט השיב היום (ב’) לבג”צ בעתירה נגד החלטת שרת החינוך יפעת שאשא ביטון, שלא להעניק את פרס ישראל לפרופ’ גולדרייך, שקרא לחרם על אוניברסיטת אריאל.

בתשובתו, כתב היועץ כי “החלטת שרת החינוך לדחות את המלצתה של ועדת השופטים להעניק את פרס ישראל בתחום חקר המתמטיקה, חקר מדעי המחשב לפרופ’ גולדרייך, אינה נתמכת בתשתית הראייתית הדרושה לשם כך, בהתאם לאמות המידה המחמירות שקבע בית משפט נכבד זה, לעניין התחשבות בשיקולים “חיצוניים”.

לפיכך, המשיך היועמ”ש בתשובתו, “החלטה זו אינה יכולה אפוא לעמוד מבחינה משפטית, ויש מקום ליתן סעד שיורה על אישור המלצתה של ועדת השופטים, כך שפרס ישראל יוענק לרפו’ גולדרייך, כפי שקבעה ועדת השופטים המקצועית”. היועמ”ש הזכיר את הצהרהת המדינה במסגרת עתירה קודמת בנושא, כי ככל שיוחלט לבסוף להעניק לפרופסור את הפרס גם אם בעקבות הכרעה שיפוטית- הפרס יוענק לו בטקס פרסי ישראל הקרוב, או במועד לפני כן, לפי בחירתו של הפרופסור.

השרה שאשא ביטון מסרה בתגובה לתשובת היועץ, “משום שבית המשפט בחר להעביר אליי את ההכרעה, אני מקווה שיכבד את הכרעתי. נימקתי את עמדתי בצורה ברורה: מי שקורא להחרים מוסד אקדמי בישראל אינו ראוי לפרס ישראל על הישגים אקדמיים”.

סערת הפרס לפרופסור גולדרייך נמצאת כבר תקופה ארוכה במחלוקת. לאחר ששר החינוך לשעבר, ח”כ יואב גלנט, החליט שפרופסור גולדרייך לא יקבל את הפרס, שופטי בית המשפט העליון, יצחק עמית, נועם סולברג ויעל וילנר החליטו פה אחד לבטל את ההחלטה של גלנט. השופטים קבעו כי יש להחזיר את ההחלטה לשולחנה של שרת החינוך יפעת שאשא ביטון, וזאת בניגוד לעמדת ראש ההרכב, השופט עמית, אשר סבר כי יש להורות למדינה להעניק את הפרס לפרופ’ גולדרייך.

שרת החינוך הודיעה כי לא תעניק לו את הפרס למרות המלצת הוועדה ועתירה נוספת הוגשה נגד החלטה זו.

פרופ’ גולדרייך חתם בעברו על מספר עצומות “בעייתיות” שעוררו את השר גלנט לשקול למנוע ממנו את הפרס. על האחרונה שבהן חתם גולדרייך בחודש ינואר האחרון, והיא כוללת קריאה לאיחוד האירופי להפסיק שיתופי פעולה עם אוניברסיטת אריאל. פרופ’ גולדרייך הצהיר באמצעות בא כוחו כי הוא עומד מאחורי חתימתו, אך מנגד הבהיר כי אינו תומך בתנועת ה-BDS. זאת, אגב, למרות שחתם רק בשנת 2019 על עצומה הקוראת לפרלמנט הגרמני לבטל את ההכרה בתנועת ה-BDS כתנועה אנטישמית.

====================================================

בבית המשפט העליון
בג”ץ 8076/21
לפני:  כבוד השופטת ד’ ברק-ארז
העותרת:ועדת השופטים להענקת פרס ישראל לשנת תשפ”א בתחום חקר מדעי המחשב
 נ  ג  ד
המשיבים:1. שרת החינוך
 2. הממונה על פרס ישראל, משרד החינוך
 3. יועץ השרה לעניין פרס ישראל
 4. היועץ המשפטי לממשלה
 5. פרופ’ עודד גולדרייך
עתירה למתן צו על-תנאי

בשם העותרת:                        עו”ד גלעד ברנע

בשם המשיבים 4-1:                עו”ד ענר הלמן, עו”ד יונתן נד”ב, עו”ד אבי טוויג

בשם המשיב 5:                      עו”ד מיכאל ספרד, עו”ד אלי שבילי


החלטה

           העתירה תיקבע לדיון בפני הרכב לא יאוחר מיום 15.2.2022.

           ניתנה היום, ‏ב’ בשבט התשפ”ב (‏4.1.2022).

                         ש ו פ ט ת

_________________________

   21080760_A13.docx   עכ

מרכז מידע, טל’ 077-2703333, 3852* ; אתר אינטרנט,  https://supreme.court.gov.il

============================================

 בבית המשפט העליון בשבתו כבית משפט גבוה לצדק
בג”ץ  2199/21 
לפני:  כבוד השופט י’ עמית
 כבוד השופט נ’ סולברג
 כבוד השופטת י’ וילנר
העותרת:ועדת השופטים להענקת פרס ישראל לשנת תשפ”א בתחום חקר המתמטיקה, חקר מדעי המחשב
 נ  ג  ד
המשיבים:1. שר החינוך
 2. הממונה על פרס ישראל, משרד החינוך
 3. יועץ השר לעניין פרס ישראל
 4. היועץ המשפטי לממשלה
 5. פרופ’ עודד גולדרייך
עתירה למתן צו על תנאי
בשם העותרת:עו”ד גלעד ברנע
בשם המשיבים 4-1:עו”ד יונתן נד”ב, עו”ד אבי טוויג
בשם המשיב 5:עו”ד מיכאל ספרד, עו”ד חגי בנזימן
פסק-דין

השופט י’ עמית:

           ושוב נדרש בית משפט זה לעסוק בפרס ישראל.

           בעתירה דנן התבקשנו להורות למשיבים 3-1 ליתן טעם מדוע לא יעניקו למשיב 5 את פרס ישראל לשנת תשפ”א בתחום חקר המתמטיקה ומדעי המחשב, כפי שקבעה העותרת, שהיא ועדת השופטים להענקת פרס ישראל לשנת תשפ”א בתחום זה (להלן: ועדת השופטים).

רקע והעובדות הצריכות לעניין

1.        המשיב 1 (להלן: שר החינוך) מינה את חברות וחברי ועדת השופטים להענקת פרס ישראל לשנת תשפ”א בתחום חקר המתמטיקה וחקר מדעי המחשב. נציין כבר עתה כי על פי הוראות סעיף 21 לתקנון פרס ישראל (להלן: תקנון הפרס), שמות ארבעת השופטים חברי הוועדה חסויים עד לפרסום הרשמי, ועל פי סעיף 34 לתקנון הפרס “עד לפרסום הרשמי, חייבים הכול, לרבות מקבלי הפרס וחברי ועדת השופטים, לשמור על סודיות ההחלטה”.

           ועדת השופטים בחנה מספר מועמדות ומועמדים לפרס, ובהחלטתה מיום 8.2.2021 החליטה פה אחד להעניק את פרס ישראל בתחום זה לפרופ’ עודד גולדרייך, הוא המשיב 5 (להלן: פרופ’ גולדרייך). בנימוקי ההחלטה נכתב כי הפרס מוענק לפרופ’ גולדרייך:

“על תרומות מעמיקות ופורצות דרך בסיבוכיות ובקריפטוגרפיה, ובפרט יצירת מושגי יסוד חשובים, לרבות פונקציות פסאודו-אקראיות, חישוב רב-משתתפים בטוח, ערפול תוכנה ובדיקת תכונות. מחקריו ביססו את התחום של מערכות הוכחה, הוכחות אפס-מידע וקידוד שניתן לבדיקה מקומית, תוך הבנת תפקידה של אקראיות בחישוב.

פרופ’ גולדרייך ידוע גם בספריו ומאמריו אשר תרמו ותורמים רבות לחינוך של דור חוקרים הממשיך את דרכו, תוך ביסוס מעמדה של מדינת ישראל ככוח עולמי מוביל בתיאוריה של מדעי המחשב”.

2.        עוד באותו יום, פנה שר החינוך אל ועדת השופטים טלפונית וביקש ממנה לחזור ולבחון שוב את החלטתה, לאור מידע שהגיע אליו בנוגע להתבטאויותיו ולהשקפותיו של פרופ’ גולדרייך. בעתירה נאמר כי מקור המידע הוא באתר ששמו “הכר את המרצה”, שם יש הפניות למספר עצומות שעליהן חתם פרופ’ גולדרייך.

           לאחר שהוועדה בחנה את המידע והמסמכים שאליהם הופנתה, חזרה ועדת השופטים ואישרה בהחלטתה מיום 18.2.2021 את החלטתה להעניק את הפרס לפרופ’ גולדרייך. הוועדה ציינה כי “כל חברי הוועדה סבורים שאין להביא בחשבון את התבטאויותיו והשקפותיו של מועמד בהחלטה על התאמתו לפרס ישראל, אלא אם כן מדובר בדברים פליליים. עקרון זה הוא חשוב על מנת לשמור על יוקרתו של הפרס”.

3.        לא נחה דעתו של שר החינוך והוא וחזר ופנה שוב אל הוועדה. במכתבו מיום 9.3.2021 ביקש שר החינוך כי הוועדה תשקול שוב את החלטתה. השר ציין כי הוא מודע לפסיקת בית המשפט בעניין פרס ישראל ולגבולות ההתערבות של שר החינוך בכל הנוגע להחלטות ועדת הפרס, אך לדעתו, המקרה דנן הוא שונה מהטעמים שפורטו במכתב, ואצטט חלק מהדברים:

“2.   בהמשך להמלצתכם הראשונית, הובא לידיעתי מידע לפיו פרופ’ גולדרייך חתום על פניה לפרלמנט הגרמני להכיר בתנועת ה-BDS כתנועה לגיטימית בגרמניה. אבקשכם לבחון את המידע האמור כיון שאם אכן מדובר במידע מדויק יש בו, להבנתי וכפי שיפורט להלן, כדי לפסול את מועמדותו של פרופ’ גולדרייך לקבלת פרס האמור להעלות על נס את תרומתו של הזוכה לחברה הישראלית.

3.    אקדים ואומר כי לפרופ’ גולדרייך יש היסטוריה עשירה וידועה של התבטאויות וחתימה על עצומות פרובוקטיביות בגנות חיילי צה”ל ובגנות מערכת המשפט הצבאית. כך, למשל ומבלי למצות (ועל סמך המידע שהובא לידיעתי ושאתם מתבקשים לבחון), פרופ’ גולדרייך תמך בטענות (הכוזבות והבלתי הוגנות) כאילו ישראל מפעילה בשטחי יהודה ושומרון מדיניות של ‘אפרטהייד’, כאילו ישראל שופטת את תושבי השטחים ‘במערכת משפט צבאית שאין בה ולו קורטוב של צדק’ וכאילו חיילי צה”ל הפועלים בשטחים הינם ‘פושעי מלחמה ישראלים’.

4.    […] האמירות האמורות הן אמירות נלוזות, שאינן מעודדות שיח ראוי וביקורת אפשרית על פעולותיהם של צה”ל ומערכת המשפט הצבאית אלא מיועדות להחליש את המוסדות האמורים המגנים (בהתאמה) על עצם קיומה של המדינה ועל אופיו המוסרי של צה”ל ולפגוע בחוסנה הלאומי של החברה הישראלית.

[…]

7.    שונה היא הקריאה האקטיבית לפרלמנט הגרמני (שהובאה לידיעתי ושגם אותה אתם מתבקשים לבחון), לה פרופ’ גולדרייך היה שותף, להכיר בלגיטימיות של תנועת ה-BDS הקוראת להחרמתה של מדינת ישראל ולמעשה, לשלילת הלגיטימיות של קיומה. כאן כבר מדובר, להבנתי, בחריגה מהמתחם המוגן של חופש הביטוי ונקיטה בפעולה החותרת תחת עצם קיומה של מדינת ישראל ומקדמת את ענייניה של תנועה שמדינות שונות ומוערכות ברחבי העולם מצאו לנכון, מסיבות טובות ומוצדקות, לאסור על פעילותה בשטחן.

8.    החלטת פרופ’ גולדרייך לפעול באופן אקטיבי לקיום ענייניה של תנועה החותרת תחת קיומה של מדינת ישראל ומבקשת, הלכה למעשה, לשלול את ההכרה במדינת ישראל היא שטר ששוברו בצידו בכל הנוגע להתאמתו למועמדות לפרס ישראל.

9.    מצב הדברים בו פרופ’ גולדרייך יקבל בידו האחת מידי המדינה את הפרס היוקרתי ביותר על תרומה לחברה הישראלית בשעה שידו האחרת מקדמת את ענייניה של תנועה החותרת תחת קיומה של אותה מדינה ממש הוא מצב דברים אבסורדי ובלתי מתקבל על הדעת. את אותה הפרדה (מלאכותית, ולטעמי קשה) בין גולדרייך ‘האזרח’ (המשתלח בחיילי צה”ל ובשופטיו) לבין גולדרייך ‘הפרופסור’ שניתן היה (אולי) עוד לעשות ביחס לאמירותיו הבזויות על חיילי צה”ל ומערכת המשפט הצבאית, לא ניתן עוד לעשות כאשר מדובר בתמיכה בפעילותה של תנועה הקוראת לשלילת ההכרה ממדינת ישראל”.

4.        לאור פנייתו זו של שר החינוך, התכנסה הוועדה שוב ודנה במכתב השר, אך בהחלטתה מיום 11.3.2021 חזרה ודחתה את פנייתו. הוועדה ציינה כי בקשת השר להתכנסות שלישית של הוועדה נוגדת את תקנון הפרס, אך למרות זאת נעתרו חברי הוועדה לבקשה לקיים דיון נוסף. אצטט חלק מהדברים שנכתבו על ידי חברי הוועדה:

“3.   בסעיף האחרון של מכתב השר, סעיף 12, אנו מתבקשים לבדוק לא רק סוגיות פוליטיות שכבר בדקנו וסוגיות פוליטיות חדשות שהעלה השר אלא גם לבחון ‘כל מידע רלוונטי נוסף’. אנחנו חוקרים, לא חוקרים פרטיים.

4.    לחותמי העצומה בעניין ה-BDS דעות שונות ומגוונות, כפי שמובהר היטב בנוסח האנגלי שלה:

The opinions about BDS among the signatories of this call differ significantly: some may support BDS, while others reject it for different reasons. Yet, we all reject the deceitful allegation that BDS as such is anti-Semitic.

5.    רבים מחותמי העצומה הנדונה נמנים עם עמודי התווך של החברה הישראלית, לרבות שישה זוכי פרס ישראל, ויו”ר כנסת לשעבר.

6.    יוקרת פרס ישראל ומניעת הידרדרותו לפרס פוליטי הן לנגד עינינו, ואנו מודאגים מהפרת תקנון הפרס המתבצעת כעת”.

           ושוב חזר שר החינוך ופנה לוועדה במכתבו מיום 14.3.2021 ואביא חלק מהדברים כלשונם:

“5.   אשר לנימוק (בסעיף 3 למכתבכם) לפיו אתם חוקרים, לא חוקרים פרטיים’, אציין כי משעה שקיבלתם על עצמכם את הכבוד והמחויבות הנלווים לכהונה בוועדת הפרס, אינכם יכולים לפטור עצמכם מחובת עריכת הבירורים העובדתיים הדרושים על מנת שהחלטתכם תהיה מבוססת כנדרש בנימוק המתחכם לפיו אינכם ‘חוקרים פרטיים’. ככל שדרושים לכם אמצעים נוספים לצורך קיבוץ המידע הרלבנטי לשם השלמת התמונה העובדתית העומדת לנגד עיניכם, עליכם לפנות אל מזכיר הועדה ולהנחותו בעניין ולא לפטור עצמכם מחובת הבירור האמורה.

6.    אשר לספקולציה (בסעיף 4 למכתבכם) לפיה אפשר שפרופ’ גולדרייך אינו תומך בתנועת ה-BDS, הרי שמדובר בספקולציה שאינה עולה כדי מילוי חובת הבירור המוטלת עליכם כחברי ועדת הפרס. לא רק שמדובר בספקולציה שאינה מוציאה אתכם ידי חובת הבירור, נראה גם כי מדובר בספקולציה נטולת בסיס. כך, על פי מידע שהובא לידיעתי בראיון עם פרופ גולדרייך שהתפרסם באתר ‘מאקו’ ביום 11.3.2021, מיוחסות לפרופ’ גולדרייך אמירות שלא ניתן להבינן אלא כתמיכה בתנועת ה-BDS.

7.    כאמור, מצב הדברים בו פרס ישראל יוענק לאדם, יהיו הישגיו האקדמיים אשר יהיו, התומך בתנועה החותרת תחת לגיטימיות מדינת ישראל ואשר מדינות זרות רבות פועלות לגינויה ולדחיקת רגליה, הוא מצב דברים בלתי מתקבל על הדעת. יודגש, שאין מדובר בסוגיה פוליטית – מדובר בסוגיה של שכל ישר.

8.    בהקשר זה אעיר כי הערתכם (בסעיף 5 למכתבכם) לפיה על חותמי העצומה בעניין ה-BDS מצויים גם שישה זוכי פרס ישראל בעבר אינה רלבנטית לחלוטין בהעדר כל טענה לפיה למי מהם הוענק הפרס לאחר החתימה על העצומה האמורה ומתוך מודעות לתמיכתו בתנועת ה-BDS. ממילא מעשיו של זוכה בפרס ישראל לאחר קבלת הפרס, כאשר מדובר במעשים שיש בהם כדי לשלול את המועמדות, אינם מהווים ‘הכשר’ למעשים דומים של מועמד לפרס” (ההדגשה במקור – י”ע).

5.        בהמשך לכך, שוחח יו”ר ועדת השופטים עם פרופ’ גולדרייך וקיבל ממנו מכתב בחתימתו, המופנה אל יו”ר ועדת השופטים, שבו נכתב “בתשובה לשאלתך, הריני מצהיר בזאת כי אינני תומך ב-BDS ומעולם לא תמכתי בארגון זה”.

6.        ביני לביני התגלגלו הדברים לתקשורת ונחשף שמו של פרופ’ גולדרייך כזוכה המיועד של פרס ישראל (בניגוד להוראות הסודיות בתקנון). מכל מקום, משלא הכריז שר החינוך על פרופ’ גולדרייך כזוכה בפרס ישראל, הוגשה העתירה דנן ביום 30.3.2021, כשבועיים ימים לפני יום העצמאות.

           הדיון בעתירה נקבע ליום שני ה-5.4.2021 אך נדחה לבקשת משיבי המדינה ליום 8.4.2021, על מנת לבחון את האפשרות לייתר את העתירה. המדינה הייתה אמורה להגיש תגובתה עד ליום 7.4.2021 שעה 12:00, אך לאחר מספר דחיות שנתבקשו, הוגשה תגובת משיבי המדינה סמוך לשעה 19:30.

7.        בתגובה, שהוגשה כאמור ערב הדיון, נאמר כי לעת הזו שר החינוך אינו יכול לקבל החלטה בעניין אישורה של המלצת ועדת השופטים, וזאת על רקע מספר פרסומים שנכתבו או נחתמו על ידי פרופ’ גולדרייך, לרבות מהעת האחרונה. הכוונה לעצומה שעליה חתם פרופ’ גולדרייך ובה “תזכורת” וקריאה לאיחוד האירופי להפסיק שיתופי פעולה של מוסדות או תכניות הקשורים לאיחוד האירופי עם אוניברסיטת אריאל (להלן: העצומה בנוגע לאוניברסיטת אריאל). שר החינוך טען כי קיימת אפשרות שיגיע לידיו מידע רלוונטי נוסף שאותו יידרש לבחון וכי יאפשר לפרופ’ גולדרייך להתייחס אליו. בתגובה נאמר כי בכוונתו של שר החינוך לקבל החלטה בעניין הפרס בתוך כחודש ימים, וככל שיוחלט להעניק לפרופ’ גולדרייך את הפרס, ניתן יהיה לעשות כן בטקס פרסי ישראל שייערך בשנה הבאה או במועד מוקדם יותר לפי בחירתו של פרופ’ גולדרייך.

           המשיב 4, היועץ המשפטי לממשלה, הביע בתגובתו את עמדתו לגבי הפרסומים המיוחסים לפרופ’ גולדרייך. לדידו, בשלושה מהם אין די כדי להצדיק החלטה של שר החינוך שלא לאשר את המלצת ועדת השופטים. ברם, באשר לעצומה בנוגע לאוניברסיטת אריאל, סבר היועץ המשפטי לממשלה, כי החלטתו של שר החינוך בדבר הצורך בהמשך בירור העניין אינה חורגת ממתחם הסבירות. לעמדת היועץ המשפטי לממשלה, בשים לב לעיתוי הפרסום ולתוכנו; בשים לב לפסיקת בית משפט זה המכירה באופן עקרוני, לעניין הענקת הפרס, באפשרות קיומם של מקרים חריגים שבהם ניתן יהיה להביא בחשבון שיקולים “חיצוניים” לשיקולים המקצועיים הצרים; בשים לב להוראות החוק למניעת פגיעה במדינת ישראל באמצעות חרם, התשע”א-2011 (להלן: חוק החרם) ולאפשרות כי קריאה לחרם עשויה להיכנס בגדרם של מקרים חריגים אלו; בשים לב להערכת שר החינוך בדבר קיומם של מסמכים רלוונטיים נוספים ולצורך בפרק זמן נוסף לבחינת העניין, לרבות מתן אפשרות להידרש להתייחסותו של פרופ’ גולדרייך לדברים בטרם קבלת החלטה סופית; ובשים לב לכך שמדובר בשאלה “לא טריוויאלית” שעשויה לדרוש ליבון משפטי שקיים קושי לבצעו עד טקס הענקת הפרס – הרי שהחלטת שר החינוך לקבל החלטה בתוך כחודש ימים אינה חורגת ממתחם הסבירות, ולכשתתקבל ניתן יהיה להעמידה לבחינה משפטית.

8.        הדיון התקיים כאמור ביום חמישי ה-8.4.2021, שבוע לפני יום העצמאות שבו מחולק ברגיל פרס ישראל, אך בשל ימי הקורונה צולם הפעם הטקס כבר ביום ראשון, ה-11.4.2021 בהרכב מצומצם של משתתפים, כדי לשדרו במוצאי יום העצמאות. מכאן סד הזמנים הדוחק שבגינו הסכימו משיבי המדינה כי הדיון בעתירה יתקיים כאילו הוצא צו על תנאי.

           כאמור, בעת שהתקיים הדיון בפנינו, שר החינוך טרם גיבש את דעתו באופן סופי. במצב דברים זה, סברנו כי יש למצות את כל האפשרויות לייתר את העתירה, מבלי שבית המשפט יידרש לסוגיה שעלולה להיתפס על ידי הציבור או חלקו, כמחלוקת פוליטית-ערכית. לכן, ומבלי שנעלם מעינינו כי עצם הדחייה יש בה כדי למנוע מפרופ’ גולדרייך לקבל את הפרס בטקס שנערך כעבור שלושה ימים, ניתנה על ידינו מיד עם תום הדיון החלטת ביניים כהאי לישנא (להלן: החלטת הביניים):

“בנסיבות המיוחדות שנוצרו, בשים לב לעמדת שר החינוך בדבר הצורך בפרק זמן נוסף לבחינת העניין, לרבות מתן אפשרות להידרש להתייחסותו של פרופ’ גולדרייך לדברים בטרם קבלת החלטה סופית; ובשים לב לעמדת היועץ המשפטי לממשלה לכך שמדובר בשאלה ‘לא טריוויאלית’ שעשויה לדרוש ליבון משפטי שיש קושי לבצעו לנוכח סד הזמנים (הדיון נערך היום, יום חמישי ה-8.4.2021 והטקס אמור להיות מצולם ביום ראשון הקרוב ה-11.4.2021) – בהינתן כל אלה, אנו סבורים כי יש לאפשר לשר החינוך לחזור ולעיין בדברים ולקבל החלטה בתוך חודש ימים מהיום. זכויות הצדדים שמורות ביחס לכל החלטה שתתקבל.

רשמנו לפנינו כי ככל שיוחלט להעניק לפרופ’ גולדרייך את הפרס, ניתן יהיה לעשות כן בטקס פרסי ישראל שייערך בשנה הבאה או במועד מוקדם יותר לפי בחירתו של פרופ’ גולדרייך”.

           30 יום חלפו, והמשיבים ביקשו פעם אחר פעם ארכה על מנת לגבש את עמדתם. ביום 10.6.2021, ערב השבעת הממשלה החדשה וסיום כהונתו של שר החינוך, מסר האחרון ליועץ המשפטי לממשלה את החלטתו הסופית לדחות את החלטת ועדת השופטים להעניק לגולדרייך את הפרס. בהחלטת השר נאמר, בין היתר, כי אין לראות את שר החינוך כחותמת גומי של ועדת הפרס; כי לצד שיקולים של מצוינות אקדמית, עומדים שיקולים שעניינם תרומת המועמד למדינת ישראל; וכי מקום שבו ועדת השופטים אינה כשירה או אינה יכולה לבחון את שאלת תרומתו של המועמד למדינת ישראל, אזי על השר לעשות כן. שר החינוך הדגיש במכתבו כי עמדתו הפוליטית של פרופ’ גולדרייך אינה רלוונטית לצורך בחינת מועמדותו לקבלת הפרס, ואילו השתכנע כי פרופ’ גולדרייך תרם לחוסנה של מדינת ישראל באמצעות תרומתו לאקדמיה, היה גאה להעניק לו את הפרס. אלא שלדברי השר, תרומתו של גולדרייך למדינה באמצעות מחקריו “מתקזזת” אל מול פעילותו להחרמת מוסדות מחקר ישראליים, המחלישה את האקדמיה הישראלית ופוגעת בחוסנה של מדינת ישראל. שר החינוך הוסיף כי אף אם פרופ’ גולדרייך אינו תומך בתנועת ה-BDS, הרי שמעשיו תומכים בתנועה ומבטאים ניסיון לפעול למתן לגיטימציה עבורה. שר החינוך החליט אפוא כי לעת הזו פרופ’ גולדרייך אינו כשיר לקבל את הפרס, וככל שבעתיד פני הדברים יהיו שונים ופרופ’ גולדרייך יפעל לחזק את האקדמיה הישראלית ויתרום תרומה חיובית לחוסנה של מדינת ישראל, אזי תיפתח בפניו הדרך לקבלת פרס ישראל.

לאחר מספר ארכות, הוגשה ביום 22.7.2021 “הודעה מעדכנת מטעם המדינה”. בהודעה נאמר כי לאחר כינון הממשלה החדשה, הובאה החלטת שר החינוך לידיעת שרת החינוך הנוכחית, אך השרה לא מצאה לנכון להידרש לעניין, וזאת בהינתן שכבר נתקבלה החלטה סופית על ידי קודמה לתפקיד, ותוך שהיא מבהירה כי תכבד כל החלטה של בית המשפט. לגופה של סוגיה, בשורה התחתונה, הביע היועץ המשפטי לממשלה את עמדתו ולפיה יש מקום להיעתר לעתירה ולהורות על אישור המלצת ועדת השופטים להעניק את פרס ישראל לפרופ’ גולדרייך.

           עמדתו זו של היועץ המשפטי לממשלה ראויה ומקובלת עלי ובהתאם לכך אציע לחברי לקבל את העתירה ולעשות את הצו למוחלט. כפי שנראה להלן, המקרה שלפנינו הוא ייחודי, אך כוחה של הפסיקה הנוגעת לפרס ישראל יפה גם לגביו.

דיון והכרעה

9.        כפי שציינו בהחלטת הביניים, “יש להצר על כך שפרס כה יוקרתי ובעל מוניטין ואירוע מאחד ומרומם לב כמו טקס פרס ישראל, הופך כמעט באופן קבוע למקור מחלוקת ופילוג“.

           מורגלים אנו בעתירות של עותרים וגופים שונים כנגד מקבלי הפרס. אלא שזו הפעם, ענייננו במקרה ייחודי וראשון מסוגו בכך שוועדת השופטים עצמה עתרה לבית המשפט לאחר ששר החינוך דחה את המלצותיה. שרי חינוך קודמים, הגם שלא תמיד רוו נחת, בלשון המעטה, מהבחירה בזוכה פרס ישראל, אימצו את החלטת ועדת הפרס. במקרה דנן, זו הפעם הראשונה ששר חינוך בישראל לא מאמץ את החלטת ועדת הפרס, ומצב ייחודי זה הביא למצב ייחודי שבו זו הפעם הראשונה שוועדת הפרס היא שעותרת כנגד החלטת שר החינוך.

           יכול הטוען לטעון כי היה על פרופ’ גולדרייך עצמו להגיש עתירה, בהיותו הנפגע הקונקרטי, וכי הוועדה מתעברת לכאורה על ריב לא לה. הטענה הועלתה על ידי משיבי המדינה בתגובתה הראשונה, אך לאור מכלול הנסיבות, מצא היועץ המשפטי לממשלה שלא לבקש את דחיית העתירה על הסף מטעם זה. עמדה זו ראויה, ואוסיף ואומר כי משהחליטה הוועדה כי פרופ’ גולדרייך ראוי לפרס ישראל, ומשנדחתה בחירת הוועדה, יש להכיר באינטרס הישיר שלה (והשוו, שמא על דרך של קל וחומר, בג”ץ 4500/07 יחימוביץ’ נ’ מועצת הרשות השניה לרדיו ולטלוויזיה, פסקה 15 סיפא (21.11.2007)).

10.      פתחנו ואמרנו כי עתירה כנגד מתן פרס ישראל לפלוני בתחום כזה או אחר, הפכה כמעט לריטואל קבוע, על אף שפעם אחר פעם דחה בית המשפט עתירות אלה. על אף ייחודה של העתירה שלפנינו, הרי שלנוכח הפסיקה שנצטברה בנושא פרס ישראל, נמצאים אנו בשדה משפט שבו נחרשו כבר תלמים. ואכן, כבר בהחלטת הביניים עמדנו על העקרונות הבאים:

“קורפוס הפסיקה שנצטבר בנושא פרס ישראל עומד לפנינו: על עצמאות שיקול הדעת המקצועי של חברי ועדת השופטים – אין חולק. על אופיו המקצועי הטהור של הפרס שעליו יוקרתו והמוניטין שלו – אין חולק. על כך שככלל, לצורך הענקת הפרס אין רלוונטיות להתבטאויות ‘פרטיות’ חוץ-מקצועיות של הזוכה בפרס – אין חולק”.

11.      מבלי להתיימר להקיף את הפסיקה בנושא, אפנה לפסקי הדין הבאים, שכל אחד מהם משקף מחלוקת ציבורית שהתעוררה בעקבות ההכרזה על זוכה הפרס, ובכל אחד מהם נדחתה העתירה:

           (-) עניין עמוס עוז (בג”ץ 1933/98 הנדל נ’ שר החינוך, התרבות והספורט (25.3.1998)) – שם נטען כי הסופר עמוס עוז אינו ראוי לקבלת פרס ישראל לספרות ולשירה בשל מאמר שפרסם, שלטענת העותר היה בו “משום פגיעה קשה בציבור רחב”;

           (-) עניין שולמית אלוני (בג”ץ 2348/00 סיעת המפד”ל, המפלגה הדתית לאומית בארץ ישראל נ’ שר החינוך (23.4.2000)) – שם נטען כי גב’ שולמית אלוני אינה ראויה לקבלת פרס ישראל על מפעל חיים;

           (-) עניין יגאל תומרקין (בג”ץ 2769/04 יהלום נ’ שרת החינוך, התרבות והספורט, פ”ד נח(4) 823 (2004) (להלן: עניין תומרקין)) – שם נטען כי האמן יגאל תומרקין אינו ראוי לקבלת פרס ישראל בתחום הפיסול, בין היתר, בשל שורת התבטאויות שבהן הביע טינה ובוז כלפי הציבור הדתי והחרדי;

           (-) עניין פרופ’ שטרנהל (בג”ץ 2454/08 פורום משפטי למען ארץ ישראל נ’ שרת החינוך (17.4.2008) (להלן: עניין שטרנהל)) – שם נטען כי פרופ’ זאב שטרנהל אינו ראוי לקבלת פרס ישראל בתחום חקר מדע המדינה, בשל שורת התבטאויות נגד התיישבות יהודית ביהודה ושומרון.

           (-) עניין הרב אריאל (בג”ץ 1977/20 האגודה למען הלהט”ב בישראל (“האגודה לשמירת זכויות הפרט”) נ’ שר החינוך (26.4.2020) (להלן: עניין אריאל)) – שם נטען כנגד זכייתו של הרב יעקב אריאל בפרס ישראל בתחום הספרות התורנית בשל שורת התבטאויות כנגד קהילת הלהט”ב;

           (-) עניין פרופ’ ניצה בן-דב (בג”ץ 2056/21 פדבה נ’ שר החינוך (25.3.2021)) – שם נטען כנגד זכייתה של פרופ’ בן דב בפרס ישראל בתחום חקר הספרות העברית והכללית, בין היתר בשל טענות העותר להתעמרות והוצאת לשון הרע על ידה.

           חריג לפסיקה דלעיל אנו מוצאים בעניין שניצר (בג”ץ 2205/97 מאסלה נ’ שר החינוך והתרבות, פ”ד נא(1) 233 (1997)), שם הורה בית המשפט על החזרת העניין לוועדת השופטים. נציין כי הפסיקה המאוחרת לעניין שניצר – שהיה פסק הדין הראשון בשרשרת פסקי הדין בעניין פרס ישראל – חזרה והבחינה בין פסק הדין לבין המקרים שנדונו לאחריו. אין חולק כי מדובר בפסק דין חריג ויוצא דופן שעליו נמתחה בשעתו ביקורת (דניאל פרידמן “שפיטות החלטות בעניין פרס ישראל” המשפט ה 181 (התשס”ה); מאיר הופמן “שפיטות החלטות בעניין פרס ישראל – עד מתי?” המשפט ח 557 (התשס”ג)).

היקף שיקול הדעת של שר החינוך ו”למה לי פוליטיקה עכשיו”?

12.      אחזור ואפנה את הקורא אל פסקה 1 לעיל, לציטוט נימוקי ועדת הפרס. הנימוקים אינם נהירים ואינם מובנים לקורא מן השורה, אלא ליודעי ח”ן בתחום המתמטיקה ומדעי המחשב. זו בדיוק הסיבה בגינה ממנה שר החינוך לוועדת הפרס שופטים שהם מומחים בתחום נשוא הפרס. רק המומחים לדבר, הם שיכולים להבין, לבחון ולהעריך מי ראוי לפרס שניתן על הישגים מקצועיים טהורים בתחום הרלוונטי.

13.      לכך השלכה על היקף שיקול דעתו של שר החינוך, ועל מידת התערבותו של בית המשפט בשיקול דעתו. במצב הדברים הרגיל בית המשפט יימנע מלהתערב בשיקול הדעת של הרשות המבצעת אלא אם נפל בה אחד או יותר מהמריעין בישין של המשפט המינהלי, כגון אי סבירות, העדר מידתיות, הפרה של כללי הצדק הטבעי, הפליה, שרירות, חריגה מסמכות וכיו”ב. לא כך כאשר בפרס ישראל עסקינן. שיקול דעתו של שר החינוך בבואו לאשר את החלטת ועדת הפרס, מצומצם מלכתחילה:

“הכרעתה של ועדה כאמור אמנם כפופה לאישורו של שר החינוך, אך בכפוף לאישור זה, שעל טיבו ומטרתו אשוב לעמוד, ועדת שופטים שמונתה כדין ופעלה בתום-לב ותוך קיום הכללים שהותוו בתקנון לפעולתה, סוברנית להחליט על-פי הבנתה המלאה. ניתן לומר כי החלטתה כמעט חסינה מפני התערבות, בין מצדו של שר החינוך ובין מצדו של בית-המשפט.

[…] אף שבעיקרון, החלטותיהן של ועדות השופטים הן שפיטות, הרי שלנוכח אופי התפקיד המוטל עליהן ורוחב שיקול-הדעת הנתון להן, הרי שרק במקרים חריגים ובנסיבות יוצאות דופן עשויה להימצא עילה להעמיד את הכרעותיהן לביקורת שיפוטית.

[…] כשלעצמי הריני סבור כי סמכות האישור הנתונה בידי שר החינוך נועדה לאפשר לו לפקח על תקינות פעילותן של ועדות השופטים לפרס ישראל, ואין סמכות זו מתירה לשר להתערב בהכרעותיהן ובהערכותיהן של הוועדות לגופן מטוב עד רע. הווי אומר: בכל הנוגע למהות השיקולים שעל יסודם מחליטה ועדת שופטים להעניק את פרס ישראל בתחום פלוני לפלוני, נתונה לוועדה אוטונומיה מוחלטת, ואין שר החינוך רשאי להתערב בהכרעתה ובשיקולים שעליהם ביססה הוועדה את החלטתה. הפיקוח שבידי שר החינוך לקיים מוגבל לבחינת הפן הארגוני-ממוני של פעולת הוועדה וכן לבחינה אם הדיונים שהתקיימו לפניה ותהליך קבלת ההחלטה על-ידיה עולים בקנה אחד עם הוראות התקנון, ואף עומדים במבחני התקינות המינהלית של המשפט הציבורי (עניין תומרקין, פסקה 12) (הדגשות הוספו – י”ע).

“לוועדת השופטים נתון שיקול דעת רחב ביותר, בהיותה גוף המונחה בשיקולים מקצועיים ובידיו הידע והנתונים לקבל החלטה […] מקום שהחלטתה של ועדת השופטים להעניק את פרס ישראל למאן-דהוא התקבלה בתום-לב ועל בסיס שיקולים מקצועיים ענייניים, אין ככלל עילה להתערבות בית משפט זה בתוכן ההחלטה” (עניין שטרנהל, פסקה 6 וההפניות שם).

14.      הנה כי כן, בניגוד להחלטות מינהליות רגילות של הרשות המבצעת, אישורו של שר החינוך את המלצת ועדת השופטים לא נועד לקיים ביקורת לגופה של החלטה, אלא בחינה אם החלטת ועדת השופטים התקבלה בהתאם למבחני המשפט המינהלי, כגון, אם מי מחברי הוועדה לא נגוע בניגוד עניינים וכיו”ב.

           זאת ועוד. על אף שלסעיף 33 לחוק החוזים (חלק כללי), התשל”ג-1973 אין תחולה ישירה על החלטות ועדות השופטים לעניין פרס ישראל, הרי שסעיף זה מקרין על מדיניות בית המשפט שלא להתערב בהחלטות ועדות השופטים, ובדומה, ראוי להחיל מדיניות מרוסנת זו גם על שר החינוך. הפרס ניתן בשל הישגים מקצועיים ולחברי הוועדה יש את המומחיות הנדרשת להחליט מי ראוי לקבל את הפרס. השיקולים שעל ועדות הפרס לשקול הם אפוא שיקולים מקצועיים טהורים. כך עולה מסעיף א’ לתקנון פרס ישראל הקובע כי הפרס יוענק ל”אזרחי ישראל יחידים, שהצטיינו מאוד וקידמו את התחום באחד המקצועות והתחומים המפורטים להלן, ושנבחרו על-ידי ועדת שופטים ציבורית”.

           מקצועיות ומצוינות – זו נקודת המוצא וזו גם נקודת הסיום.

15.      לצד ההפרדה העניינית בין שיקולים מקצועיים לבין התבטאויות שאינן נוגעות לתחום המקצועי, ניתן בפסיקה משקל לחופש הביטוי.

           במדינות דמוקרטיות, חופש הביטוי והחופש האקדמי הולכים שלובי זרוע. הכל כבר נאמר בעניין שטרנהל ואחזור ואביא דברים בשם אומרם:

“בעוד פרס ישראל ניתן בגין הישגים מקצועיים ראויים להערכה, ההתבטאויות בהן מדובר על פי רוב נעשות מחוץ למסגרת המקצועית בגינה ניתן הפרס. במצב דברים זה קשה שלא לראות את מניעת הפרס ממי שנמצא ראוי לו בשל הישגיו המקצועיים, אך על בסיס עמדות שהביע, כפגיעה בחופש הביטוי, ולו באופן עקיף. תוצאה שכזו יש לה אפקט של ‘סתימת פיות’ שאין לה מקום במשטר דמוקרטי, שהלוא מהו המסר המתקבל אם לא מסר של השתקה? עצם הידיעה כי הבעת דעה שאינה פופולרית עשויה לשאת כעבור זמן תוצאות במישור שיש לו היבט מקצועי, גם אם על דרך של הענקת פרס, אינה מתיישבת עם תרבות של חופש ביטוי במשטר דמוקרטי” (שם, פסקה 10).

           ומכאן שגם התבטאויות שהן “צורמות, בוטות ועולבות בציבור שלם” (עניין אריאל, פסקה 10), נדחות מפני יוקרתו המקצועית של פרס ישראל והפגיעה בחופש הביטוי.

16.      בית המשפט חזר והדגיש בעניין שטרנהל כי להתבטאויות של מועמדים לפרס ישראל בנושאים שאינם נוגעים לתחום המקצועי שבגינו הם זוכים בפרס, אין מקום במערך השיקולים שעל ועדות הפרס לשקול, וכפי שאמר המשורר, “אז למה לי פוליטיקה עכשיו”? למדינת ישראל, כמדינה שמעודדת מצוינות בתחומי המדע והטכנולוגיה, יש אינטרס מובהק להפריד בין דעות פוליטיות וחברתיות כאלה ואחרות של המועמד, לבין הערכה אקדמית של יכולותיו המקצועיות ותרומתו המקצועית בתחומו. זו הסיבה בגינה ועדות מומחים מהשורה הראשונה בתחום הרלוונטי הן שממליצות על המועמד לפרס וכאמור, זו הפעם הראשונה בהיסטוריה של פרסי ישראל, ששר חינוך לא אישר המלצה של ועדת שופטים מקצועית.

עניינו של פרופ’ גולדרייך על רקע הפסיקה דלעיל

17.      הפסיקה הכירה בכך שאין “לשלול באופן מוחלט את האפשרות כי תהיינה התבטאויות שנשמעו מפי מועמד לפרס ואשר חומרתן כה חריפה וכה קיצונית, עד כי יהא זה בלתי ראוי ובלתי סביר להתעלם מהן ולשקול אך את זכויותיו המקצועיות של אותו מועמד” (עניין שטרנהל, בפסקה 10).

           מהם אותם מקרים חריגים וקיצוניים? ככל שאנו נדרשים ליתן בהם סימנים, נביא לדוגמה מועמד שמעל ראשו תלוי כתב אישום על מעשים פליליים חמורים, או מעשים והתבטאויות מאלו המפורטים בסעיף 7א לחוק יסוד: הכנסת, על פי הפסיקה שפירשה ויישמה חוק זה: שלילת קיומה של מדינת ישראל כמדינה יהודית ודמוקרטית; הסתה לגזענות; תמיכה במאבק מזוין של מדינת אויב או של ארגון טרור נגד מדינת ישראל (וראו עניין שטרנהל, בפסקה 10).

18.      לנוכח הוראות חוק החרם, היועץ המשפטי לממשלה סבר כי עקרונית, קריאה לחרם יכולה להיכנס בגדר המקרים הקיצוניים והחריגים שבהם ניתן להתחשב בשיקול “חיצוני” לשיקולים המקצועיים. אך זאת, בהתחשב במכלול נסיבות המקרה – חומרת הדברים, עדכניותם, תכיפותם וכיו”ב.

           שר החינוך השתית את החלטתו על הפרסומים הבאים (חלקם הובאו לידיעתו רק לאחר החלטתו לדחות את החלטת ועדת השופטים):

           (-) מכתב משנת 2005 – מכתב לעיתון ה”גרדיאן” הבריטי, שעליו חתומים מספר אנשי אקדמיה, שם נטען כי אוניברסיטת אריאל מנוגדת לחוק הבינלאומי. במכתב זה יש תמיכה בקריאה לחרם של ארגון אקדמאי בריטי על אוניברסיטת בר אילן בשל שיתוף הפעולה שלה עם אוניברסיטת אריאל.

           (-) עצומה משנת 2008 – עצומה עליה חתומים עשרות אנשים, הממוענת למזכיר הכללי של הכנסיה המתודיסטית המאוחדת, וקוראת לכנסיה לתמוך בכנס הכללי שלה בהצעה שלא להשקיע בחברות ש”מאפשרות לכיבוש להמשיך”, וכי ככל שכך יוחלט “אנו החתומים מטה נריע ליוזמתכם האמיצה, ונקווה שהדבר יהווה דוגמה להרבה אחרים ללכת בעקבותיה”.

           (-) עצומה משנת 2011 – מחאה פומבית נגד חוק החרם, עליה חתומים מאות אנשים, כולל פרופ’ גולדרייך וכולל אנשי אקדמיה, שרים וחברי כנסת לשעבר, בכירים לשעבר בצבא ובגופי ביטחון אחרים, כולל כלות וחתני פרס ישראל ופרס ביטחון ישראל.

           (-) מאמר משנת 2014 – במאמר זה דן פרופ’ גולדרייך בהצדקות להטלת חרם ומנתח את הסוגיה מזוויות שונות.

           (-) עצומה משנת 2019 – עצומה המופנית אל מפלגות בגרמניה, ועליה חתומים חוקרים יהודים וישראלים המבקשים להבחין בין אנטישמיות לבין תמיכה בזכויות האדם של פלסטינים, וזאת לאור הצעות שעלו בפרלמנט הגרמני להשוות את תנועת ה-BDS לאנטישמיות.

           (-) העצומה בנוגע לאוניברסיטת אריאל משנת 2021 – שבה נכתב כי על האיחוד האירופי לעמוד בכללים שקבע הוא עצמו בעניין אוניברסיטת אריאל. התאריך על גבי העצומה הוא 23.3.2021 אך פרופ’ גולדרייך הבהיר בדיון שנערך בפנינו, כי העצומה נחתמה על ידו בחודש ינואר 2021. בעצומה, עליה חתומים 522 חותמים, נטען כי האיחוד האירופי מעניק לגיטימציה למוסדות אקדמיים ישראליים הפועלים בהתנחלויות לא-חוקיות בשטחים ואינו עומד בכללים שהוא עצמו קבע. הלכה למעשה, יש בעצומה זו קריאה לאיחוד האירופי להפסיק שיתופי פעולה של מוסדות/תוכניות הקשורים לאוניברסיטת אריאל.

           העצומה בנוגע לאוניברסיטת אריאל, היא שעמדה בבסיס בקשתו של שר החינוך ליתן לו שהות לבחון את הדברים, בקשה לה נעתרנו בהחלטת הביניים.

19.      לגישת היועץ המשפטי, המקובלת עלי, אין במכתבים או בעצומות שנסקרו לעיל, חלקם לפני שנים ארוכות, כדי לגבש עילה שלא לאשר את המלצת ועדת השופטים להעניק לפרופ’ גולדרייך את פרס ישראל. חלק מהמכתבים והעצומות נחתמו מספר שנים לפני חקיקתו של חוק החרם ולפני פסק הדין שניתן בבג”ץ 5239/11 אבנרי נ’ הכנסת (15.4.2015)), שדחה עתירות שתקפו את חוקתיותו של החוק. חלוף הזמן מאז פורסמו מרבית המכתבים או העצומות, בצירוף הצהרתו הנוכחית של פרופ’ גולדרייך כי אינו תומך ב-BDS כפי שיפורט להלן, מביאים למסקנה כי לא מתקיימות נסיבות קיצוניות שבהן תיתכן התחשבות חריגה בשיקול חיצוני לצורך הענקת פרס ישראל.

           העצומה משנת 2019 – שנחתמה על ידי פרופ’ גולדרייך ועל ידי כמאתיים אנשי אקדמיה מכל רחבי הארץ – קוראת לפרלמנט הגרמני לבטל את ההכרה בתנועת ה- BDS כתנועה אנטישמית. השאלה אם יש לזהות קריאה לחרם על ישראל עם אנטישמיות שנויה במחלוקת בשיח הציבורי בארץ ובחו”ל. יש הסבורים כי מטרתה של תנועת ה-BDS היא לפעול כנגד החזקתה של ישראל בשטחים, ולדידם, אין לזהות ביקורת חריפה על מדיניות ממשלת ישראל בשטחים כאנטישמיות. דומה שרוב הציבור אינו רואה כך את תנועת ה-BDS, ורבים וטובים סבורים כי לפנינו תנועה אנטישמית בתחפושת, וליתר דיוק, אנטישמיות בצורתה החדשה, אנטישמיות מדינית השוללת את זכותו של העם היהודי להגדרה עצמית ושוללת את עצם קיומה של מדינת ישראל. כך סבר גם הפרלמנט הגרמני, שאליו מצאו לפנות חותמי העצומה. יש שיתמהו מה מצאו אנשי אקדמיה בישראל לפנות לגרמניה (דווקא לגרמניה) כדי להעמידה על “טעותה” ולהסביר לפרלמנט הגרמני מהי אנטישמיות. מכל מקום, אין בחתימה על אותה עצומה, כשלעצמה, כדי להכניס את פרופ’ גולדרייך אל אותן נסיבות חריגות שבהן “ניתן יהא לשקול שיקולים שאינם מקצועיים גרידא” (עניין שטרנהל, בפסקה 10).

20.      העצומה בנוגע לאוניברסיטת אריאל מעוררת לכאורה קושי מסוים לנוכח ההגדרה בסעיף 1 לחוק החרם הקובע כלהלן:

‘חרם על מדינת ישראל’ – הימנעות במתכוון מקשר כלכלי, תרבותי או אקדמי עם אדם או עם גורם אחר, רק מחמת זיקתו למדינת ישראל, מוסד ממוסדותיה או אזור הנמצא בשליטתה, שיש בה כדי לפגוע בו פגיעה כלכלית, תרבותית או אקדמית.

           חוק החרם מטיל אחריות נזיקית ושולל הטבות מינהליות מסוימות כמפורט בחוק. אני נכון להניח כי קריאה לחרם על מדינת ישראל או לחרם על האקדמיה במדינת ישראל, במיוחד מפיו של מי שיוקרתו והישגיו צמחו לו בערוגות האקדמיה בישראל, עשויה להיכנס לגדר המקרים הקיצוניים והחריגים של התחשבות בשיקול “חיצוני”. זאת, מאחר שקשה להלום כי איש אקדמיה ישראלי, שפועל במסגרת האקדמיה הישראלית ונהנה מחסותה, ישתתף בקריאה לחרם על האקדמיה בישראל. מצב מעין זה הוא בבחינת אבסורד שקשה להעלותו על הדעת. את דעתי על החרם האקדמי הבעתי בעניין אבנרי:

“החרם הוא כלי יוצא דופן בארגז הכלים של חופש הביטוי […] יש משהו אורווליאני בטענת העותרים כי החוק מגביל את חופש הביטוי. חרם אקדמי-תרבותי מהווה סתימת פיות במובן הפשוט של המילה, מונופול של דוכן אחד ויחיד בשוק הדעות, אנטי-תזה מובהקת לחופש הביטוי ולרעיון של שוק דעות חפשי. החרם התרבותי-אקדמי על ישראל, נועד לשתק ולהשתיק את הביטוי הפוליטי, לכפות דעה אחת ו’אמת’ אחת”.

           ברם, פרופ’ גולדרייך הצהיר וחזר והבהיר כי אינו תומך בתנועת ה-BDS. עוד קודם לדיון שנערך בפנינו, פרופ’ גולדרייך הגיש תגובה מטעמו שבה נאמר כי הוא:

 “מכבד את פרס ישראל וחש גאווה גדולה על שוועדת השופטים/ות המקצועית לפרס ישראל בחרה בו לזוכה בפרס על תרומתו לחקר מדעי המחשב לשנת תשפ”א […] ובמסגרת הניסיון להדוף את ההכפשות של השר, המשיב 5 אף הבהיר כי הוא איננו תומך בתנועת ה-BDS, אולם יובהר מיד כי המשיב אינו סבור כי לעמדותיו המדיניות והפוליטיות, לרבות בשאלת יחסו לתנועה זו, יש רלבנטיות כלשהי לשאלה אם הוא זכאי לפרס ישראל אם לאו. ההבהרה נעשתה לאור הכתבות הרבות שפורסמו ומשום שהשר ייחס לו מבלי לברר עימו עמדות שאינן עמדותיו, וייחוסים אלה גם פורסמו ברבים”.

           גם במכתבו של בא כוחו של פרופ’ גולדרייך מיום 5.5.2021 במענה למכתבו של שר החינוך, נאמר כי “הוא איננו תומך בתנועת החרם על ישראל ואילו היה תומך ברי כי לא היה מסכים כלל לקבל את הפרס”. גם במהלך הדיון, שב פרופ’ גולדרייך והבהיר והצהיר באמצעות בא כוחו כי הוא עומד מאחורי חתימתו על העצומה אך אינו תומך בתנועת ה-BDS. במסגרת בחינת התבטאויותיו של פרופ’ גולדרייך יש לזכור כי חופש הביטוי הוא אחד השיקולים שנלקחו בחשבון בפסיקה בנושא פרס ישראל, והדברים נכונים במיוחד כאשר בביטוי פוליטי עסקינן.

21.      פרס ישראל נושא אופי ממלכתי, מקצועי וא-פוליטי. מהפסיקה שהובאה דלעיל נמצאנו למדים כי החלטת ועדת השופטים להעניק את פרס ישראל לפלוני “כמעט חסינה מפני התערבות מהותית בשיקוליה מצדו של שר החינוך, ואף מפני ביקורת שיפוטית” (דברי השופט מצא בעניין תומרקין). שיקול הדעת המוקנה לשר החינוך ביחס להמלצת ועדת השופטים תחום ומוגדר היטב, ומוגבל למקרים שבהם נמצא פגם בהליכי עבודת הוועדה או בנסיבות קיצוניות שלטעמי אינן מתקיימות במקרה דנן.

           מהפסיקה דלעיל ניתן לחלץ אמירה ברורה וחד-משמעית ולפיה יש להבחין בין דעותיו האישיות של מקבל הפרס, גם אם מקוממות וקיצוניות ושנויות במחלוקת, לבין הנושא המקצועי המסור לוועדת הפרס. מתן פרס ישראל לפלוני או לאלמוני אין בו משום “הסכמה” לדעותיו ולהליכותיו של אותו מועמד. אך כפי שנאמר על ידי השופטת (כתוארה אז) נאור בעניין תומרקין: “לכל אחד משופטי בית-משפט זה, כאזרח במדינה, עמדה ערכית משלו בשאלה אם ראוי פלוני לפרס המכובד הניתן בשם כולנו, אם אינו ראוי לאצטלא זו. עמדות אישיות אלה ישמור כל אחד מאתנו לעצמו, ואל לנו להפוך את בית המשפט לוועדת-על לאי-הענקת פרסים”.

           אכן, הפרס הוא ממלכתי אך אינו אמור לשקף קונצנזוס של הציבור. אין בתקנון הפרס תנאי סף לפיו על ועדת השופטים לבחור רק במי שאוחז בדעות שהן בקונצנזוס הציבורי:

“[…] נראה כי ייסודו של הפרס על הסדר וולונטרי מבטיח ביתר-שאת את עצמאותן של ועדות השופטים ומגן על הפרס – חרף היותו פרס ממלכתי – מפני השפעותיהם של גורמים פוליטיים. מאותם טעמים כנראה נמנעו נסחיו של תקנון פרסי ישראל מלכלול בתקנון תנאי סף להכרה בזכאות המועמד שעליו המליצה ועדת שופטים, לקבל את הפרס” (עניין תומרקין, פסקה 14) (הדגשות הוספו – י”ע).

22.      לא למותר להזכיר את התהליך שבסופו החליט שר החינוך, ממש ב”דקה ה-90″, כי הוא מבקש לבחון שוב את עניינו של פרופ’ גולדרייך. נכון ליום 6.4.2021 עמדתו של היועץ המשפטי לממשלה כפי שהועברה לשר החינוך הייתה, כי יש לאשר את המלצת ועדת השופטים ואין בשלוש ההתבטאויות של פרופ’ גולדרייך שעמדו באותה עת בפניו, חלקן מלפני שנים, כדי לפסול את זכייתו בפרס ישראל. מכאן, שבנקודת זמן זו, ניתן היה לצפות כי שר החינוך יפעל כפי שפעלו כל קודמיו לפניו, ויאשר את הזכייה בפרס. ברם, בשלב זה נעשה ניסיון לאיתור התבטאויות נוספות של פרופ’ גולדרייך, וביום 7.4.2021, יום אחד לפני המועד שנקבע לדיון, העביר שר החינוך ליועץ המשפטי את העצומה שעליה חתם גולדרייך, הנושאת את התאריך 22.3.2021 וכך התגלגלו הדברים כמתואר לעיל.

סוף דבר

23.      ועדת השופטים החליטה להעניק את הפרס לפרופ’ גולדרייך על הישגיו המקצועיים, על עשייתו האקדמית העשירה והמוערכת ועל הישגיו המוערכים בארץ ובעולם. החלטתו של שר החינוך חורגת מאמות המידה שהותוו בפסיקה העניפה שנזכרה לעיל וממכלול ההסדרים הנוגעים לפרס ישראל. לא על שר החינוך המלאכה לבחון את ה”תרומה למדינה” של המועמד באשר שיקולים אלה חורגים מתקנון פרס ישראל, מההלכה הפסוקה, ומהפרקטיקה הנוהגת מזה שנים רבות. התרומה של המועמד לתחום עיסוקו מסורה לוועדת השופטים. כפי שפורט לעיל, התחשבות בשיקולים חיצוניים בבחירה בזוכה בפרס ישראל שמורה לנסיבות קיצוניות וחריגות במיוחד, ולא זה המקרה שלפנינו.

24.      אשר על כן, אציע לחברי להפוך את הצו על תנאי למוחלט, ולהורות למשיבים 3-1 להעניק לפרופ’ גולדרייך את פרס ישראל בתחום חקר המתמטיקה ומדעי המחשב כפי שקבעה ועדת השופטים להענקת פרס ישראל לשנת תשפ”א.

           לנוכח הצהרת היועץ המשפטי בתגובתו הראשונה, הרי ש”הכדור” עובר למגרשו ולבחירתו של פרופ’ גולדרייך – אם לבקש כי הפרס יוענק לו בטקס פרסי ישראל בשנה הבאה התשפ”ב או במועד לפני כן, שלא במסגרת הטקס השנתי של פרסי ישראל.

           המשיבים ישאו בהוצאות העותרת בסך 15,000 ₪ ובהוצאות המשיב 5 בסך 15,000 ₪ (סה”כ 30,000 ₪).

25.      אחר הדברים האלה, משהונחה לפני חוות דעתם של חברי, השופט  נ’ סולברג והשופטת י’ וילנר אוסיף מילים מספר בנוגע למסקנה האופרטיבית שאליה הגיעו.

במקרה שלפנינו התוצאה היא בהכרח בינארית – קבלת הפרס או שלילתו. אין מדובר במקרה שבו עומדות לפני הרשות המינהלית מספר אפשרויות בתוך מתחם הסבירות, שאז יש לעיתים טעם להחזיר לרשות המינהלית את ההחלטה על מנת שתבחר באחת האפשרויות בתוך מתחם הסבירות. ובכלל, לא כל אימת שבית משפט זה מוצא כי נפל פגם בהחלטת הרשות המינהלית, הוא מחזיר את ההחלטה אל הרשות המינהלית לצורך עיון מחדש בהחלטה, והדברים הם מן המפורסמות (ראו, מני רבים, בג”ץ 153/83 לוי נ’ מפקד המחוז הדרומי של משטרת ישראל, פ”ד לח(2) 393 (1984); בג”ץ 1284/99 פלונית נ’ ראש המטה הכללי, פ”ד נג(2) 62 (1999); בג”ץ 6840/01 פלצמן נ’ ראש המטה הכללי – צבא ההגנה לישראל, פ”ד ס(3) 121 (2005)).

כפי שנאמר בעניין תומרקין, וצוטט גם על ידי חברי, החלטת ועדת הפרס “כמעט חסינה מפני התערבות מהותית בשיקוליה מצדו של שר החינוך”. אזכיר שוב כי על פי תקנון פרס ישראל, המלצת ועדת השופטים מקבלת תוקף לאחר אישור השר, ומשהגענו למסקנה כי דין החלטת השר במקרה דנן להתבטל, הרי שביטול החלטת השר מביא מאליו לפתרונה של הסוגיה. כל הנתונים והשיקולים הצריכים לעניין כבר הונחו לפתחנו והתוצאה אפוא ידועה וברורה – שר החינוך צריך היה לאשר את החלטת ועדת השופטים להעניק לפרופ’ גולדרייך את הפרס, כעמדתו של היועץ המשפטי לממשלה שסבר כי הנסיבות דנן רחוקות מהנסיבות הקיצוניות והקשות שבהן תיתכן התחשבות, חריגה כשלעצמה, בשיקולים חיצוניים. דווקא לאור דברים הנחרצים והנכוחים של חבריי, שאליהם אני כמובן מצטרף, כי שר החינוך שקל שיקולים שאינם ממין העניין כמו תרומתו של המועמד למדינת ישראל, התוצאה האופרטיבית מתבקשת מאליה. משכך, איני רואה טעם ותוחלת בהחזרת הנושא לשולחנה של שרת החינוך, מה שיביא מן הסתם להחזרת הנושא אל שולחננו.

ש ו פ ט

השופט נ’ סולברג:

1.         דברי חברי, השופט י’ עמית, בחלקם, מקובלים ורצויים; אך למסקנתו, לא אוכל להצטרף. אפרט ואבאר.

2.         פרס ישראל מוענק בראש ובראשונה כאות ומופת להצטיינותו ולתרומתו המקצועית של מי שנבחר לזכות בו; לא בכדי ועדה מקצועית יושבת על המדוכה, וממליצה על הזוכים. חייו האישיים והתבטאויותיו הפרטיות של הזוכה, הרי הם שיקולים ‘חיצוניים’, ועל פני הדברים, הם זרים להחלטה זו. הצטיינות ומקצועיות, עשויות להימצא אצל מי שדעותיו האישיות נטועות בלב הקונצנזוס הישראלי, ובאותה מידה גם אצל מי שדעותיו קיצוניות. אלה כמו אלה, עשויים להימצא ראויים לעטרה נכבדה זו – פרס ישראל – אם הצטיינותם ותרומתם המקצועית רמה ומוּכחת. הדברים עולים מן האמור בחלק א’ לתקנון פרסי ישראל, שבו נקבע כך: “פרסי ישראל יוענקו על-ידי שר החינוך, ביום העצמאות במעמד ראשי המדינה, לאזרחי ישראל יחידים, שהצטיינו מאוד וקידמו את התחום באחד המקצועות והתחומים המפורטים להלן, ושנבחרו על-ידי ועדת שופטים ציבורית”. כדברים האלה אמר השופט (כתוארו אז) א’ מצא בבג”ץ 2769/04 יהלום נ’ שרת החינוך, התרבות והספורט, פ”ד נח(4) 823, 839 (2004) (להלן: עניין תומרקין): “הדעת נותנת שלא בכדי נמנעו שר החינוך בן-ציון דינור, שבימי כהונתו (בשנת 1953) נוסד פרס ישראל, וכל שרי החינוך שבאו אחריו מלעגן את פרס ישראל בחקיקה. נראה כי ייסודו של הפרס על הסדר וולונטרי מבטיח ביתר-שאת את עצמאותן של ועדות השופטים ומגן על הפרס – חרף היותו פרס ממלכתי – מפני השפעותיהם של גורמים פוליטיים. מאותם טעמים כנראה נמנעו נסחיו של תקנון פרסי ישראל מלכלול בתקנון תנאי סף להכרה בזכאות המועמד שעליו המליצה ועדת שופטים, לקבל את הפרס”.

3.         ניכר אפוא, כי השיקול המרכזי והעיקרי בבחירת זוכה, נוגע למידת הצטיינותו ותרומתו המקצועית בקשר עם התחומים והעניינים שפורטו בתקנון; בעוד שאישיותו המלבבת או נועם הליכותיו – אינם עומדים למבחן. כאמור, טעמים כבדי-משקל עומדים ביסוד קביעה זו, בהם רצון למנוע פוליטיזציה של הפרס, מתוך הבנה כי גלישה מן התחום המקצועי אל זה האישי, אשר מעצם טיבו וטבעו עמום יותר, יכול שיהיה כחומר ביד היוצר.

4.         יחד עם זאת, אין משמעות הדברים כי לעולם חוסן, וכי לא ניתן להתחשב בהתנהגות או התבטאות, שאינה קשורה במישרין למצוינות האישית שהביאה להענקת הפרס. כפי שציין חברי השופט עמית, ובהתאם להלכה הפסוקה, ועדת הפרס, כמוה גם שר החינוך, רשאים לשקול, במקרים החריגים המתאימים, גם שיקולים ‘חיצוניים’ שאינם נוגעים למידת המצוינות של מקבל הפרס. כך למשל, אם נמצא כי המועמד עשה שימוש בביטויים גזעניים קשים כלפי אדם או ציבור מסוים, אם נקט ביזוי קשה כלפי אלה, או אם שלל את קיומה של מדינת ישראל כמדינה יהודית ודמוקרטית, הסית לגזענות ולאלימות, או תמך במאבק מזוין נגד המדינה. אין זו רשימה ‘סגורה’. כפי שנקבע בבג”ץ 2454/08 פורום משפטי למען ארץ ישראל נ’ שרת החינוך (17.4.2008), מפי השופטת ע’ ארבל: “ניתן להעלות על הדעת נסיבות בהן יהא זה ראוי, ואף מתבקש, כי אל מול הישגיו המקצועיים של מועמד לפרס ישראל ישקלו שיקולים נוספים, כלליים. בהחלט יתכנו מקרים בהם לא ניתן יהא לשקול שיקולים שאינם מקצועיים גרידא אלא נוגעים בדמותו של המועמד ובמשמעויות הערכיות והחברתיות של הבחירה בו. כך למשל, מועמד המזוהה עם ערכים המנוגדים באופן ממשי לערכיה של מדינת ישראל, דוגמת מי שידוע כאוחז בעמדות גזעניות, או מקרים קיצוניים מעין זה. בנוסף, איני יכולה לשלול באופן מוחלט את האפשרות כי תהיינה התבטאויות שנשמעו מפי מועמד לפרס ואשר חומרתן כה חריפה וכה קיצונית, עד כי יהא זה בלתי ראוי ובלתי סביר להתעלם מהן ולשקול אך את זכויותיו המקצועיות של אותו מועמד. כידוע, גם רף הסיבולת הגבוה ביותר שנטל על עצמו הציבור במדינה דמוקרטית באשר לחופש הביטוי אין משמעו כי הנייר והאוזן סובלים הכל ותיתכנה התבטאויות שיש בהן השפלה או ביזוי כה קשים בכבודו של אדם או של ציבור. במצב מעין זה דומני כי לא יהא זה סביר להעניק לאותו אדם את אות ההערכה הגבוה ביותר שמעניקה מדינת ישראל לבניה ובנותיה”. בכלל זה, מקובלת עלי עמדת היועץ המשפטי לממשלה, כי גם קריאה לחרם על ישראל, באחת מן הדרכים הנזכרות בחוק למניעת פגיעה במדינת ישראל באמצעות חרם, התשע”א-2011 (להלן: חוק החרם), עשויה להיות נסיבה רלבנטית, הראויה לבחינה במסגרת אותם שיקולים ‘חיצוניים’.

5.         בהקשר זה אבקש להסתייג מעמדת חברי השופט עמית, הסבור שדווקא “קריאה לחרם על מדינת ישראל או לחרם על האקדמיה במדינת ישראל, במיוחד מפיו של מי שיוקרתו והישגיו צמחו לו בערוגות האקדמיה בישראל, עשויה להיכנס לגדר המקרים הקיצוניים והחריגים של התחשבות בשיקול ‘חיצוני’. זאת, מאחר שקשה להלום כי איש אקדמיה ישראלי, שפועל במסגרת האקדמיה הישראלית ונהנה מחסותה, ישתתף בקריאה לחרם על האקדמיה בישראל. מצב מעין זה הוא בבחינת אבסורד שקשה להעלותו על הדעת” (פסקה 20 לחוות דעתו; ההדגשות הוספו – נ’ ס’). לעמדתי-שלי, גם חרם כלפי אדם מסוים, או כלפי מוסד מסוים, עשוי לעלות כדי מקרה חריג, שיש בכוחו לאפשר התחשבות בשיקולים ‘חיצוניים’. זאת אני לָמֵד מהגדרת המונח “חרם על מדינת ישראל” בסעיף 1 לחוק החרם: “הימנעות במתכוון מקשר כלכלי, תרבותי או אקדמי עם אדם או עם גורם אחר, רק מחמת זיקתו למדינת ישראל, מוסד ממוסדותיה או אזור הנמצא בשליטתה, שיש בה כדי לפגוע בו פגיעה כלכלית, תרבותית או אקדמית” (ההדגשות הוספו – נ’ ס’). מלשון הסעיף עולה בבירור, כי חרם-הוא-חרם; בין אם הוא מופנה כלפי קהל עם ועדה, בין אם הוא מופנה כלפי יחידים; בין אם הוא מופנה כלפי האקדמיה בישראל, בין אם הוא מופנה ‘רק’ כלפי אוניברסיטת אריאל. סבורני אפוא, כי במקרים המתאימים ובנסיבות ההולמות, גם קריאה לחרם נגד אדם או גורם ספציפי, עשויה לבוא בקהל המקרים החריגים המצדיקים התחשבות באותו שיקול ‘חיצוני’.

6.         דעת לנבון נקל, כי מעשיו ופעולותיו של פרופ’ גולדרייך, בכל הנוגע לענייני החרם (6 מהם הובאו לפנינו), אינם בקונצנזוס; אדרבה – הם מעלים את חמתם של רבים, אשר מוצאים בהם טעם רב לפגם; בפרט כך, מקום שבו מדובר במי שנהנה מחסות אקדמית ישראלית מחד גיסא, ומנסה למנוע קשרים אקדמיים, שמא גם כלכליים, ממוסד הנמנה על מוסדותיה האקדמיים של המדינה, רק מחמת מיקומו הגיאוגרפי, באזור המצוי בשליטתה, מאידך גיסא; לא בכדי ראה היועץ המשפטי לממשלה, בצדק, להתייחס אל מעשיו ופעולותיו אלוּ של פרופ’ גולדרייך – “בחומרה רבה”. זהו אכן היחס ההולם. יחד עם זאת, אם נבקש לצמצם את יריעת המחלוקת, נמצא, כפי שטען לפנינו היועץ המשפטי לממשלה, כך:

           (א) כי 3 מן הפעולות שננקטו על-ידי פרופ’ גולדרייך, והובאו לעיוננו, נעשו לפני עשור ויותר, 2 מהן עוד קודם לחקיקת חוק החרם: כך לגבי המכתב משנת 2005, שבו נטען כי הקמת אוניברסיטת אריאל מנוגדת לחוק הבינלאומי, תוך תמיכה בקריאתו של ארגון אקדמאי בריטי להחרים את אוניברסיטת בר-אילן, מחמת שיתוף הפעולה שהיא מקיימת עם אוניברסיטת אריאל; כך לגבי העצומה מחודש ינואר 2008, שבה נקראה הכנסיה המתודיסטית המאוחדת, לתמוך בהצעה שלא להשקיע בחברות המאפשרות את ‘המשך הכיבוש’, בהקשר הישראלי של הדברים; וכך גם לגבי העצומה משנת 2011, שבה הובעה מחאה נגד חקיקת חוק החרם, על-ידי מאות אנשים, בהם פרופ’ גולדרייך, תוך קריאה להחרים מוצרים שמקורם באיו”ש.

           (ב) כי 2 מהפעולות הנוספות שנקט בהן פרופ’ גולדרייך אינן מעידות על קריאה ישירה לחרם: זאת ביחס למאמר שפִּרסם בשנת 2014, שבו נדונה שאלת ההצדקה על הטלת חרם, תוך ניתוח הסוגיה מזוויות שונות; וכן ביחס לעצומה שעליה חתם בשנת 2019, אשר מופנית אל מפלגות בגרמניה, ובה מובעת דאגה מפני העלייה באנטישמיות בעולם כולו ובגרמניה, כאשר לצד זאת מבקשים החותמים להזהיר מפני השוואה בין אנטישמיות לבין תמיכה בזכויות האדם של פלסטינים, נוכח הצעות מצד מפלגות בגרמניה לפרלמנט הגרמני, להשוות את תנועת ה-BDS לאנטישמיות.

           (ג) כי פרופ’ גולדרייך הבהיר במפורש, אם במסגרת התכתבויותיו עם ועדת הפרס ושר החינוך, אם בעת בירור העתירה לפנינו, כי הוא אינו תומך בתנועת החרם על ישראל, וכי הוא “מכבד את פרס ישראל וחש גאווה גדולה על שוועדת השופטים/ות המקצועית לפרס ישראל בחרה בו לזוכה בפרס על תרומתו לחקר מדעי המחשב לשנת תשפ”א”.

7.         נראה אפוא, כי הקושי העיקרי שנותר לפנינו נוגע לפעולתו האחרונה של פרופ’ גולדרייך – חתימתו על עצומה בראשית שנת 2021 (העצומה מתוארכת לחודש מרץ 2021, אך פרופ’ גולדרייך טוען כי חתם עליה בחודש ינואר 2021), שבה נכתב כי האיחוד האירופי נותן לגיטימציה למוסדות אקדמיים ישראלים, הפועלים בתחומי איו”ש, בכך ששיתף את אוניברסיטת אריאל בתוכנית מחקר במימונו, בניגוד לכללים שקבע האיחוד האירופי עצמו בעניין זה.

8.         על פני הדברים, כדברי חברי השופט עמית, “הלכה למעשה, יש בעצומה זו קריאה לאיחוד האירופי להפסיק שיתופי פעולה של מוסדות/תוכניות הקשורים לאוניברסיטת אריאל” (פסקה 18 לחוות דעתו); אם לא במישרין, ודאי בעקיפין. השאלה שלפנינו היא אפוא, האם די בחתימה על עצומה זו כדי להביא את העניין דנן בקהל אותם מקרי-קצה חריגים, אשר לגביהם נפסק כי ניתן לשקול בגדרם גם שיקולים ‘חיצוניים’, שאינם נוגעים במישרין לאיכותו המקצועית של הזוכה? היועץ המשפטי לממשלה סבור, כי יש להשיב על שאלה זו – בשלילה. לדבריו: “יושם אל לב גם שהמכתב מסב עצמו, ככתוב בו, על טענה שעל האיחוד האירופי לעמוד בכללים שקבע הוא עצמו בעניין, כללים שלמיטב ההבנה חלים מבחינת האיחוד האירופי ושמדינת ישראל מודעת להם וחרף קיומם התקשרה בעניין מול האיחוד האירופי; מה שדי בו כדי להדגיש ביתר שאת את ריחוקן של נסיבות כאלה מאותן נסיבות קיצוניות וקשות שבהן תיתכן התחשבות – חריגה – בשיקול חיצוני לצורך הענקת פרס ישראל”. לזאת מוסיף היועץ המשפטי, גם את הצהרתו של פרופ’ גולדרייך, אגב ההליך שלפנינו, כי הוא אינו משתייך לתנועת החרם. לעומתו, שר החינוך התייחס לסוגיה באופן שונה בתכלית; לגבי דידו, פרס ישראל איננו “פרס נובל לעניים”, הוא אינו ניתן על יסוד מצוינות מקצועית בלבד. לשיטת השר, טרם מתן החלטה בדבר הענקת פרס ישראל, יש לבחון את המועמדים בשתי מסננות שונות; האחת – מקצועית, האחרת – ערכית; והן דרות שתיהן בכפיפה אחת. לדבריו, השיקול המקצועי הוא אמנם תנאי-סף, בלעדיו-איִן, עליו אמוּנה הוועדה המייעצת, אך גם בהתקיימוֹ, הוא איננו ‘שובר-שוויון’; אין בכוחו לגרוע מן המשקל המשמעותי שיש ליתן גם לשיקול הערכי. השר מוסיף עוד, כי לטעמו, השיקול הערכי כפוף בעיקר לקביעותיו-שלו, משום שלוועדה המקצועית אין בהקשר זה עדיפות מיוחדת על פניו. בהינתן זאת, ובנסיבות העניין דנן, סבר השר כי “את תרומתו של פרופ’ גולדרייך כחוקר מאיינים מעשיו הנמשכים של פרופ’ גולדרייך המכוונים לפגוע במדינת ישראל ובחלקים מהאקדמיה הישראלית”. בהתאם החליט השר, כי “את פרס ישראל – הפרס של מדינת ישראל, המוענק על תרומה למדינת ישראל – אין פרופ’ גולדרייך ראוי לקבל, לפחות לא לעת הזו. […] כל עוד ידו האחת בונה והשניה הורסת, אין הוא עומד בתנאים לקבלת הפרס”. דומני, בהתייחס לעמדת השר, כי “טענו חטין, והודה לו בשעורים” (משנה, שבועות ו, ג). בעוד שהיועץ המשפטי לממשלה בחן את העניין כנדרש, בהתאם להלכה הפסוקה, שלפיה רק במקרים חריגים וקיצוניים ניתן יהיה לשקול אותם שיקולים ‘חיצוניים’, שאינם נוגעים למידת תרומתו ומקצועיותו של הזוכה; בחר השר לפעול בדרך שאינה עולה בקנה אחד עם ההלכה הפסוקה. במסגרת החלטתו הפך החריג לכלל, הוא החיל הליך דו-שלבי על בחירת הזוכה – שלב מקצועי ושלב ערכי – תוך מתן משקל רב לשיקול הערכי. דומה אפוא, כי תשובתו של שר החינוך לשאלה שהעלינו קודם לכן, אינה ממין העניין. השאלה איננה האם ראוי להעניק את הפרס לפרופ’ גולדרייך, אלא, כפי שפורט לעיל, האם מעשהו זה של פרופ’ גולדרייך – חתימתו על העצומה משנת 2021 – הוא כה מקומם, עד כי הוא בא בקהל אותם מקרי-קצה חריגים, המאפשרים לשקול אותו כשיקול ‘חיצוני’. משלא ניתן מענה לשאלתנו זו בהחלטת השר, שבה נבחנה הסוגיה באופן שונה בתכלית, עמדתי היא כי אין מנוס מלהשיב את העניין אל שרת החינוך, על מנת שתבחן את ההחלטה פעם נוספת – זאת הפעם בהתאם להלכה הפסוקה – ותחליט כחוכמתה.

9.         אמנם, בנקודת הזמן הזו, משהשר לא שקל את השיקולים המתאימים, יש בכוחנו להורות על קבלת העתירה, כדעת חברי, השופט עמית, תוך אימוץ המלצת הוועדה, כעמדת העותרים, שאליה הצטרף גם היועץ המשפטי לממשלה. ברם, אינני סבור כי כך עלינו לנהוג, ולהעניק, אנחנו, שופטי בג”ץ, במו-ידינו, את פרס ישראל, לראשונה מאז היווסדו. תמים-דעים אני עם השופטת (כתוארה אז) מ’ נאור, לגבי דבריה בעניין תומרקין: “לכל אחד משופטי בית-משפט זה, כאזרח במדינה, עמדה ערכית משלו בשאלה אם ראוי פלוני לפרס המכובד הניתן בשם כולנו, אם אינו ראוי לאצטלא זו. עמדות אישיות אלה ישמור כל אחד מאתנו לעצמו, ואל לנו להפוך את בית המשפט לוועדת-על לאי-הענקת פרסים” (ההדגשה הוספה – נ’ ס’). מצדי אוסיף: כשם שאל לנו להפוך את בית המשפט לוועדת-על לאי-הענקת פרסים, כך גם אל לנו להפוך את בית המשפט לוועדת-על להענקת פרסים. מוטב לנו, כשופטים, להימנע מלהכניס ראשנו למחלוקות ציבוריות-ערכיות מעין אלה.

10.      טרם סיום אציין עוד זאת: תחושה לא נוחה אופפת אותנו, כל אימת שאנו נדרשים, בעל כורחנו, להתפלפל בשאלות של הענקת פרס, לפלוני או אלמוני. ספק רב אם העניין שפיט, אם בית המשפט הוא הכתובת המתאימה לדון בדבר ולהכריע בו (ראו האמור בסעיף 61(ב) לחוק החוזים (חלק כללי), התשל”ג-1973, בצירוף סעיף 33 לחוק זה, הקובע כי “חוזה שלפיו יינתן ציון, תואר, פרס וכיוצא באלה על פי הכרעה או הערכה של אחד הצדדים או של אדם שלישי, אין ההכרעה או ההערכה לפי החוזה נושא לדיון בבית משפט”). לגבי דידי, נראה כי מדובר בשאלה מקצועית (כאשר הטרוניה היא כי המועמד אינו ראוי בפן המקצועי) וערכית (כאשר המועמד נתקף משום מעשיו הפרטיים והאישיים); כך או כך, השאלה היא לבר-משפטית. כך נאמר בעניין תומרקין: “החלטה להעניק את פרס ישראל לפלוני – הגם שהיא כמעט חסינה מפני התערבות מהותית בשיקוליה מצדו של שר החינוך, ואף מפני ביקורת שיפוטית – אין היא חסינה מפני ביקורת ציבורית. וזה, לטעמי, גם דינה הראוי של ההחלטה להעניק את פרס ישראל בתחום הפיסול לתומרקין, שאף היא פתוחה לביקורתו של הציבור הרחב” (ראו בהקשר זה: דניאל פרידמן “שפיטות החלטות בעניין פרס ישראל” המשפט ה’ 181 (תשס”א); מאיר הופמן “שפיטות החלטות בעניין פרס  ישראל – עד מתי?” המשפט ח’ 557 (תשס”ג)). דומה בעינַי, כי מוטב לבית המשפט להדיר רגליו מן העיסוק בכגון דא, למשוך ידו מהענקת פרס, או ממניעת הענקתו. עדיף לו, לפרס, להיות נתון למבחן הציבור.

11.         אשר על כן, משנמצא כי לא נשקלו השיקולים המתאימים על-ידי שר החינוך, אציע לחברַי כי לא נחליט אנחנו במקומו על הזכייה בפרס ישראל, לשבט או לחסד, וכי נשיב את העניין אל שרת החינוך, על מנת שתשקול את הסוגיה כדבעי ותחליט כהלכה.

ש ו פ ט

השופטת י’ וילנר:

1.        עיינתי בחווֹת הדעת של חבריי, השופטים י’ עמית ונ’ סולברג, ואני מצטרפת לעמדתם כי החלטת שר החינוך לדחות את המלצת ועדת השופטים להעניק לפרופ’ גולדרייך את פרס ישראל לשנת תשפ”א בתחום חקר המתמטיקה ומדעי המחשב – אינה יכולה לעמוד ויש להורות על ביטולה. באשר לתוצאה האופרטיבית של ביטול החלטת השר, שלגביה נחלקו חבריי, ראיתי להצטרף לחוות דעתו של חברי, השופט נ’ סולברג. אבאר להלן את נימוקיי לכך.

2.        כפי שציינו חבריי בהרחבה, לא אחת עמד בית משפט זה על שיקול הדעת הרחב הנתון לחברי ועדת פרס ישראל בתחום מקצועי זה או אחר, וכפועל יוצא מכך – אף על הצמצום המתחייב בשיקול דעתו של שר החינוך בהחלטה אם לאשר את המלצות הוועדה, אם לדחותן. בתוך כך, נקבע כי נקודת המוצא היא שחברי ועדת הפרס הם אנשי מקצוע המומחים בתחומם, ולכן אוחזים ביתרון ניכר, כמעט מכריע, בכל הנוגע לבחירת המועמד הראוי ביותר לקבלת פרס ישראל בשל כישוריו, תרומתו והישגיו המקצועיים. על רקע זה, הוטעם כי “בכל הנוגע למהות השיקולים שעל יסודם מחליטה ועדת שופטים להעניק את פרס ישראל בתחום פלוני לפלוני, נתונה לוועדה אוטונומיה מוחלטת, ואין שר החינוך רשאי להתערב בהכרעתה ובשיקולים שעליהם ביססה הוועדה את החלטתה” (ראו: בג”ץ 2769/04‏ יהלום נ’ שרת החינוך והתרבות, פ”ד נח(4) 823, 838 (2004); ההדגשה הוספה, י.ו.; וכן ראו: סעיף א לתקנון פרס ישראל). בהתאם לכך, נקבע עוד כי הסמכות הנתונה לשר החינוך ביחס להחלטות הוועדה תחומה אך לפיקוח על פגמים דיוניים-ארגוניים, כגון פגמים שנפלו בקיום הוראות התקנון, מבחני התקינות המינהלית, כללי ההימנעות מניגוד עניינים וכיוצא באלה (ראו: עניין יהלום, שם).

3.        כמו כן, הודגש כי ככלל, אין מקום לשלול את הזכייה בפרס ישראל מאדם אשר נמצא ראוי לו מחמת עשייתו המקצועית, אך בשל התבטאויות שנויות במחלוקת שאינן נוגעות לעשייתו זו. זאת, הן מאחר שהתבטאויות מעין אלה חורגות מן המסגרת המקצועית העומדת לבחינתה של ועדת הפרס, והן מחמת החשש לפגיעה בחופש הביטוי של מועמדים לפרס ישראל – הכולל גם את זכותם להביע עמדות חריגות ואף מכעיסות בעיני הציבור או חלקים ממנו (ראו: בג”ץ 2454/08 פורום משפטי למען ארץ ישראל נ’ שרת החינוך‏, פסקה 10 (17.4.2008) (להלן: עניין פורום משפטי); וכן ראו: בג”ץ 1977/20 האגודה למען הלהט”ב בישראל (“האגודה לשמירת זכויות הפרט”) נ’ שר החינוך, פסקאות 11-9 (26.4.2020)).

4.        יחד עם זאת, צוין בפסיקה כי לצד אופייה המקצועי המובהק של עבודת ועדת הפרס, הרי שאין לשלול את האפשרות כי בבחינת מועמדותו של אדם לפרס ישראל, יינתן לעתים משקל אף לשיקולים “חיצוניים” – חברתיים-ערכיים, שהם בעלי משקל ניכר ויוצא דופן בחריגותו (ראו: עניין פורום משפטי, שם).

5.        נמצאנו למדים, אפוא, כי בבחינת מועמדותו של אדם לזכייה בפרס ישראל, הכלל הוא כי יישקלו אך תרומתו וסגולותיו המקצועיות של המועמד בתחום שלגביו עתיד להינתן הפרס. בחינתם של שיקולים מקצועיים מעין אלה נתונה כל כולה לשיקול דעתם של חברי ועדת הפרס – המומחים בתחום הנדון, ושר החינוך ימעט עד מאד מהתערבות בהמלצותיהם, למעט במקרים שבהם נפל בהתנהלות הוועדה פגם הליכי המצדיק את דחיית המלצותיה, כפי שבואר לעיל. לצד האמור, מתן משקל לשיקולים “חיצוניים”, כגון סוגיות חברתיות-ערכיות אשר אינן נוגעות לעשייתו המקצועית של המועמד לפרס ישראל, הוא אך בבחינת חריג שבחריג לכלל המתואר, אשר שמור למקרים נדירים וקיצוניים ביותר.

6.        יישום דברים אלה על ענייננו מעלה כי בהחלטתו מיום 10.6.2021, בה דחה שר החינוך את המלצת ועדת פרס ישראל להעניק לפרופ’ גולדרייך את הפרס בתחום חקר המתמטיקה ומדעי המחשב – הפך השר את היוצרות, משל היה החריג לאחד מרכיבי הכלל ממש, כפי שציין חברי השופט סולברג. כך, למשל, כתב שר החינוך בהחלטתו כדלקמן:

“כאשר נשקלת מועמדותו של איש אקדמיה לקבלת הפרס בתחומו המקצועי, עניין התרומה לאקדמיה הישראלית, ובאמצעותה – למדינת ישראל, אינו הטפל ההולך אחרי העיקר אלא, לכל הפחות, שיקול שווה-ערך לשיקול המצוינות האקדמית, אף אם בסדר הדברים הוא נשקל רק לאחר שהמועמד צולח את תנאי המצוינות האקדמית…

אין חולק כי תנאי הכניסה שאין בילתו לשערי המועמדות לקבלת פרס ישראל הוא מצוינות אקדמית או חברתית. מבחינת סדר הדברים זהו גם התנאי הראשון הנבדק. על בחינת עמידת המועמד בתנאי זה מופקדים אנשי האקדמיה המרכיבים את ועדת הפרס… ואולם עמידת המועמד בתנאי זה שעניינו מצוינות מקצועית אינה מבטיחה לו את קבלת פרס ישראל שכן עליו לעמוד בתנאי נוסף והוא – התרומה למדינת ישראל. על בחינת עמידת המועמד בתנאי זה מופקד, להבנתי, שר החינוך באותם מקרים חריגים יחסית בהם תרומתו המחקרית והאקדמית של המועמד אינה מכריעה גם את שאלת תרומתו למדינת ישראל…” (חלק מההדגשות הוספו, י.ו.).

הנה כי כן, הקורא בהחלטת שר החינוך עשוי לטעות ולחשוב כי חרף פסיקותיו המפורשות של בית משפט זה, שיקולים חברתיים-ערכיים אשר עניינם ב”תרומה למדינת ישראל”, כלשון השר, משמשים כחלק בלתי נפרד מן השיקולים אשר יש לבחון בטרם הכרזה על הזוכה בפרס. זאת, אף תוך מתן משקל שווה ערך (אם לא למעלה מכך) לשיקולים “חיצוניים” אלה, לצד השיקולים המקצועיים הנבחנים על-ידי חברי ועדת הפרס. בתוך כך, אף הרחיב שר החינוך את שיקול הדעת הנתון לו בפיקוח על החלטות הוועדה, ואשר צומצם בפסיקה לכדי פגמים דיוניים-ארגוניים בלבד, ולמעשה הפך עצמו לגורם נוסף השוקל באופן מובחן, לעתים דה-נובו ממש, את עמידתו של מועמד לפרס ב”תנאי התרומה למדינת ישראל”. 

7.        נוכח כל האמור, אני מסכימה לעמדת חברי, השופט נ’ סולברג, כי החלטת שר החינוך ניתנה תוך מתן משקל יתר לשיקולים אשר על-פי פסיקתו של בית משפט זה, יש לשמרם אך למקרים חריגים ונדירים במיוחד. לפיכך, ברי כי יש לבטל את החלטת השר לדחות את המלצת ועדת הפרס.

8.        ואולם, בביטול החלטת השר לא די, ועלינו להוסיף ולבחון מה תהא תוצאתו האופרטיבית של ביטול ההחלטה האמורה. בסוגיה זו נחלקו חבריי, כאשר השופט עמית סבור כי עלינו להכריז על פרופ’ גולדרייך כזוכה בפרס לשנת תשפ”א; ואילו השופט סולברג גורס כי עלינו להשיב את ההכרעה בנדון לשרת החינוך על מנת שתשוב ותשקול את המלצת ועדת הפרס, זאת לאור אמות המידה שהותוו בפסיקת בית המשפט. במחלוקת זו, כפי שציינתי לעיל, אני מצטרפת לעמדתו של חברי, השופט נ’ סולברג.

9.        כלל ידוע הוא כי נקודת המוצא בהפעלת ביקורת שיפוטית על החלטותיהן של רשויות המינהל היא כי בית משפט זה אינו מחליף את שיקול דעתו של הגורם המינהלי המוסמך בשיקול דעתו שלו, וכי על ההתערבות השיפוטית בכגון דא להיעשות באיפוק ותוך כיבוד חלוקת התפקידים בין רשויות השלטון. כלל זה משליך אף על ההכרעה במקרים שבהם לא די בקביעה כי החלטת הרשות המינהלית בטלה בשל פגמים שנפלו בה או בהליך קבלתה, אלא יש צורך לקבל החלטה חדשה תחתיה. במקרים אלו, עומדות בפני בית המשפט שתי חלופות אפשריות – האחת, לקבל החלטה חדשה במקום זו שבוטלה, והשנייה, להשיב את העניין לרשות המינהלית על מנת שזו תקבל החלטה חדשה בהתאם להנחיות שבפסק הדין אשר הורה על ביטול ההחלטה המקורית. אני סבורה כי ככלל, ראוי לו לבית המשפט להעדיף את אפשרות הפעולה השנייה, שהגיונה בצדה, ולהשיב את הדיון בסוגיה הנדונה אל הרשות המינהלית המוסמכת לשם מתן החלטה מחודשת, זאת הפעם בשים לב להוראות שניתנו בפסק הדין המבטל את ההחלטה המקורית. יפים לעניין זה דבריה של פרופ’ ברק-ארז:

“תוצאות ההתערבות השיפוטית – במקרה הרגיל, כאשר בית המשפט פוסל את שיקול הדעת שהפעילה הרשות המינהלית, ההחלטה חוזרת אל הרשות על מנת שתחליט בה בעצמה פעם נוספת לאור פסק דינו של בית המשפט. זהו ביטוי נוסף לגישה הבסיסית הגורסת שההחלטה מסורה בידי הרשות, ואל לו לבית המשפט להחליט במקומה. חריגים לכלל זה ניתן למצוא במקרים שבהם קיים חשש ממשי כי בשל תהליך ההחלטה שהתקיים לא תוכל הרשות להחליט בנושא מחדש בלי להיות ‘מקובעת’ בהחלטתה הקודמת, או במקרים שבהם נותרה למעשה חלופת החלטה אחת בלבד (לדוגמה, כאשר הבחירה היא בין שתי חלופות)” (ראו: דפנה ברק-ארז משפט מינהלי כרך ב 624 (2010); ההדגשה הוספה, י.ו.).

           דברים ברוח זו כתב אף פרופ’ זמיר בספרו:

“במקרים רבים הביטול של החלטה מינהלית כשלעצמו מספק פיתרון מלא בעניין הנדון, אך יש מקרים שבהם עם ביטול ההחלטה המינהלית נוצר צורך בקבלת החלטה חדשה שתסדיר את העניין הנדון. כיצד לנהוג במקרה כזה? כפי שבית המשפט אמר, ‘ברירת המחדל במקרים שבהם נמצא פגם בהחלטת הרשות המינהלית היא להשיב את העניין לשולחנה’. כך הדבר משום שהסמכות להחליט באותו עניין ושיקול הדעת הכרוך בהחלטה הוקנו על פי החוק לרשות המינהלית” (ראו: יצחק זמיר הסמכות המינהלית כרך ד – סדרי הביקורת המשפטית 2909 (2017); ההדגשה הוספה, י.ו.).

           (כן ראו והשוו בתחום דיני המכרזים: עע”ם 8409/09 חופרי השרון בע”מ נ’ א.י.ל. סלע (1991) בע”מ, פסקה פ לחוות דעתו של השופט (כתוארו אז) א’ רובינשטיין ופסקה 3 לחוות דעתו של השופט (כתוארו אז) ס’ ג’ובראן (24.5.2010); בענייני הענקת מעמד בישראל: עע”ם 9371/08 סאלח נ’ משרד הפנים, פסקה 13 (15.2.2011); ובאשר לתוצאותיה של הפליה בהענקת זכות הנתונה לשיקול דעת הרשות, ראו: בג”ץ 637/89 חוקה למדינת ישראל נ’ שר האוצר, פ”ד מו(1) 191, 208-206 (1991); ברק-ארז, בעמודים 711-710).

10.     השבת הדיון במועמדותו של פרופ’ גולדרייך לפרס ישראל אל שרת החינוך, מוצדקת ביתר שאת לנוכח הפסיקה העקבית לפיה בית משפט זה מבכר למשוך ידיו מהתערבות בעתירות הנוגעות ל(אי-)זכייה בפרס ישראל. פסיקתו של בית המשפט בנדון נומקה בעיקרה לאור השיקולים המקצועיים העומדים ביסוד הפרס, והרצון להימנע מהחלפת שיקול דעתם של הגורמים האמונים על הענקתו. ודוק, נימוקים אלה יפים אף לעניין בחירת התוצאה האופרטיבית הראויה בעקבות ביטול החלטת שר החינוך (ראו: בג”ץ 2205/97‏ מאסלה נ’ שר החינוך והתרבות, פ”ד נא(1) 233, 238 (1997); עניין יהלום, בעמודים 836-832, ו-840; עניין פורום משפטי, בפסקה 6; בג”ץ 2324/11 גיל נ’ שר החינוך, פסקאות 10-9 (26.4.2011); והשוו: בג”ץ 1933/98 הנדל נ’ שר החינוך התרבות והספורט (25.3.1998); בג”ץ 2348/00 סיעת המפד”ל, המפלגה הדתית לאומית בארץ ישראל נ’ שר החינוך (23.4.2000); כן השוו בהקשר זה להוראת סעיף 33 לחוק החוזים (חלק כללי), התשל”ג-1973).

11.      אשר על כן, אני מצטרפת, כאמור, לעמדת חבריי כי יש לבטל את החלטת שר החינוך לדחות את המלצת ועדת הפרס בדבר זכייתו של פרופ’ גולדרייך בפרס ישראל לשנת תשפ”א בתחום חקר המתמטיקה ומדעי המחשב. בכל הנוגע לתוצאה האופרטיבית של ביטול החלטת השר, אני מסכימה עם חברי, השופט נ’ סולברג, כי יש להחזיר את הדיון בענייננו אל שרת החינוך על מנת שתשוב ותבחן את המלצתה של ועדת הפרס במסגרת אמות המידה שהותוו לשם כך בפסיקתו של בית משפט זה, ובכלל זה בהתאם לפסק הדין דנן.

12.     בשולי הדברים, אך לא בשולי חשיבותם, ראיתי להוסיף ולהעיר כי אף אני מצטרפת לעמדת היועץ המשפטי לממשלה אשר ראה בחומרה רבה את התבטאויותיו של פרופ’ גולדרייך, כמו גם לעמדתו לפיה לא מן הנמנע כי קריאה לחרם על ישראל, באחת מן הדרכים הנזכרות בחוק למניעת פגיעה במדינת ישראל באמצעות חרם, התשע”א-2011 (להלן: חוק החרם), עשויה, במקרים המתאימים, להיות נסיבה “חיצונית” רלוונטית, אשר תישקל בבחינת זכאותו של מועמד לפרס ישראל. בתוך כך, כפי שהדגיש חברי השופט סולברג, אף קריאה לחרם על מוסד אקדמי יחיד (ובכלל זה על אוניברסיטת אריאל) עשויה לשמש כשיקול כאמור, וזאת, בין היתר, אף לאור הגדרתו המפורשת של המונח “חרם על מדינת ישראל” שבסעיף 1 לחוק החרם. ואולם, השאלה העומדת להכרעתה של שרת החינוך היא אם יש בחתימת פרופ’ גולדרייך על העצומה בראשית שנת 2021, משום נסיבה חיצונית חריגה ויוצאת דופן שיש בה כדי להצדיק את שלילת פרס ישראל ממנו, חרף הישגיו המקצועיים וטיבו המקצועי המובהק של הפרס, ולשם כך, כאמור, ראינו להשיב אליה את הנושא למתן החלטה חדשה.

13.     לבסוף, יש לקוות כי הדיון החוזר ונשנה בפרס ישראל יוותר בזירה הראויה לו – היא הזירה הציבורית – לטובת העניין ולכבודו של פרס ישראל.

ש ו פ ט ת

           אשר על כן, הוחלט פה אחד לבטל את החלטת שר החינוך לדחות את המלצת ועדת פרס ישראל להעניק לפרופ’ גולדרייך את הפרס לשנת תשפ”א בתחום חקר המתמטיקה ומדעי המחשב.

           כמו כן, הוחלט על דעת השופטים נ’ סולברג וי’ וילנר, כנגד דעתו החולקת של השופט י’ עמית, להשיב את בחינתה של המלצת הוועדה אל שרת החינוך על מנת שתשוב ותשקול אם לאשר המלצה זו.

           ניתן היום, ‏ד’ באלול התשפ”א (‏12.8.2021).

ש ו פ טש ו פ טש ו פ ט ת

_________________________

   21021990_E17.docx   עכב

מרכז מידע, טל’ 077-2703333, 3852* ; אתר אינטרנט,  https://supreme.court.gov.il

=====================================================
https://www.the7eye.org.il/147127

חוזרים להנחלה

העיתונים מדווחים על המאבק הפוליטי סביב פרס ישראל 

חנוך מרמרי 11.02.2015 

המנחילים

המושג “הנחלה” מופיע פעמים רבות במשנתו של בן-ציון דינור (דינבורג), אדריכל התרבות של הישראליות בחיתוליה. “צריך למצוא דרך להנחיל לעם לא יצירות גרידא ולא ידיעתם של סופרים”, כתב, “אלא תמצית עמדתו הרוחנית של ישראל בעולם”. ומהי עמדה רוחנית זו? “להחדיר בהם במוקדם את גישת החיים שלנו שהיא קשורה עם יסודות התרבות וההשכלה שלנו”.

דינור, שחיפש “דרכים חדשות אל ההמונים”, היה אינטלקטואל ופקיד שלטון גם יחד שכיהן כשר החינוך מטעם מפא”י בארבע ממשלות (1951–1955). דינור, שיזם את חוק החינוך הממלכתי וחוק זכרון השואה והגבורה, הגה וייסד בין השאר את פרס ישראל על כל דקדוקי בחירותיו ופרטי טקס הענקתו. דינור, שהיה בוודאי אדם ראוי, זכה פעמיים בפרס ישראל (ללימודי יהדות ולחינוך), ולא סירב לקבלו, כבן-גוריון למשל. לא רק את הפרס כונן, אם כך, אלא גם את הסבב המעגלי שבו איש המחקר מעניק את הפרס לאיש החזון והרוח, וזה בתורו מעניק את הפרס לאיש המחקר.

מרטין בובר היה נואם הכבוד בטקס הענקת פרס ישראל הראשון, שנערך ב-5 באפריל 1953. בנאומו הציג שתי גישות שונות ליחסים שבין מדינה לאנשי הרוח שבה. המודל הראשון הוא של הכפפה מוחלטת של התרבות למדינה. “המדינה היא שקובעת את קנה-המידה התרבותי, היא שמגדירה את האמת למדע ואת היופי לאמנות, וכל יצירה תרבותית נעשית בהכוונתה וביוזמתה”. המודל האחר הוא “הכרה של המדינה בערך התרבות העצמאית, והפקת תועלת ממנה דווקא מתוקף עצמאותה”. לפי גישה זו, “המדינה והתרבות הן שותפות במפעל משותף, למען מטרה משותפת. החופש שמוענק לתרבות הוא שמאפשר יצירה מקורית, ובזכות היצירה הזו מגיע העם לגישוּם אחדותו העמוקה שגם המדינה שואפת לו”.

בובר בירך על כך שישראל, בזכות “מורשתה ומסורתה הקדומה”, שייכת לסוג השני של המדינות.

חרף שלטונו הריכוזי של בן-גוריון, יחסי האליטה האינטלקטואלית והמדינה התגבשו ברוח תקוותו של בובר יותר מאשר ברוח חזונו של דינור. ואמנם, רק בשנים ההן יכלה להתקיים תופעת אבא חושי, ראש העיר הנצחי של חיפה, שיזם פרויקט להעתקת משכנם של סופרים לעיר בתקווה לכונן בה סצינה ספרותית. עידוד היצירה מבחינתו התגלם בהענקת דירות עם מרפסת המשקיפה לים לאלה שיהגרו מן המרכז ומירושלים להר הכרמל.

אבל זה היה קוריוז מקומי, שהתאים לזמנו, ובסך-הכל צמחה כאן סצינה אינטלקטואלית עצמאית, תוססת, שנבנתה ממחלוקות פנימיות עזות בתוכה וכמה מאנשיה לא חששו להטיח את הפרס בחזרה במעניקיו – לא חשוב מאיזו ממשלה – ולא מתוך סגפנות בן-גוריוניסטית, אלא מתוך חתרנות לשמה. משנים די מוקדמות הפרס לא רק נתפס כאן כאות הערכה, אלא גם כאינטרס שלטוני, והחזרת הפרס לנותניו ביטאה גם מחאה כלפי העובדה שהפרס החליף ידיים בין ההגמונים לבין עצמם.

מי שירצה יוכל לכרוך את כל מהפכות התרבות המתחוללות כאן עם שקיעת ההגמוניה הוותיקה – בפיקוד הבכיר על צבא, בריסוק האוניברסיטאות, במאבק המר נגד התקשורת – ועכשיו היד הנעלמה נשלחת אל המחקר והיצירה. היה אפשר לברך על חילופי הדורות אילו היו מתרחשים מתוך שיח פנימי, כפי שדורות יוצרים מרדו באבותיהם הרוחניים. אבל כאן נראה שמחזירים את השעון לאחור. לימי דינור ובן-גוריון. נראה כי הפקידות התרבותית תופסת מחדש את השלטון שהופקע מידיה. לא מהפך, אלא מהפכת נגד. האם ההגמונים החדשים מתכוונים להקים כאן את המדינה מחדש?

תרעלה רוחנית

“להחזיר את פרס ישראל לישראל”, קורא נדב העצני במאמרו בעמוד הדעות של “מעריב”, שמובאה ממנו מודפסת בעמודו הראשון. “כמה טוב שיש מערכת בחירות מדי פעם. מסתבר שזו אולי הדרך היחידה לגרום לליכוד, ובעיקר לעומד בראשו – בנימין נתניהו, לפעול להגשמת המנדט שקיבל מהבוחרים שלו ולא רק לדאוג לג’ובים ובקבוקים. כל-כך הרבה שנים הליכוד בשלטון והנה, לראשונה, עושה ראש הממשלה צעד ראשון לקראת מה שהיו חייבים לעשות ראשי הממשלה מאז 1977 – לשמוט את השליטה של השמאל הקיצוני בתחום התרבות”.

העצני מציג כמה פריטים ברשימה השחורה שלו: פרופ’ הירשפלד התייצב בגלוי וחתם על עצומה המביעה תמיכה במי שמסרבים לשרת ביו”ש והוא חבר המועצה הציבורית של הארגון האנטי-ישראלי בצלם; פרופ’ נסים קלדרון כתב מאמר תמיכה נלהב בסרבני 8200; דוד טרטקובר, “שמוציא את דיבתנו רעה באופן שיטתי”, ומאז קיבל את הפרס נוסף לכל עצומה ויצירה מסיתה שהוא חתום עליהן התואר המכובד “חתן פרס ישראל”; א”ב יהושע, עמוס עוז, “וכמובן יוסי יונה – הציוני מהמחנה. הדעות הקיצוניות של אלו ידועות מזה שנים. רק לאחרונה חתמו מי מהם על עצומה שקראה לפרלמנטים זרים להכיר במדינה פלסטינית, אבל התייצבותם בפאתי השמאל הקיצוני לא מונעת מהם ומרבים שכמותם – במאים, תסריטאים, אמנים, שחקנים ועוד – לקבל מענקים ופרסים ממלכתיים ולהזריק לעורקי התודעה שלנו את התרעלה הרוחנית שהם משווקים”.

“אינני אוהב התערבות פוליטית בתהליכי תרבות, וחבל שאבנר הולצמן, חוקר ראוי, חטף בעקבו של אריאל הירשפלד”, כותב דרור אידר ב”ישראל היום”, “אבל מה הטענה? הוועדות הללו הן ברובן פוליטיזציה אסתטית במסווה. אפשר להבין את חבורת פורסי הפרסים שהתרגלה להעניק יוקרה ומעמד לאנ”ש ולהם בלבד. פתאום גם הם עומדים למבחן, ולא רק בני-טיפוחיהם. המצב העלוב של מדעי הרוח והחברה באוניברסיטאות נובע, בין השאר, בשל פוליטיזציה יתרה שבמסגרתה הפכו חוקרים ומרצים את הקתדרה שלהם לבמה פוליטית חד-ממדית. לפוליטיקה יש סימני קריאה ולחוקרים מהמחקר המדעי – סימני שאלה.

“הירשפלד הסתובב אמש באולפני הטלוויזיה כקדוש מעונה. הוא תהה כיצד פסלוהו משיקולים פוליטיים ולא תרבותיים, בעוד זה מה שהוא עצמו עשה במשך שנים. כי זאת האמת, מכלול מפעלו הביקורתי של הירשפלד בתחום הספרות נגוע בפוליטיזציה. באוקטובר 2006 התקיים פסטיבל המשוררים הבינלאומי בירושלים שהירשפלד היה מנהלו האמנותי. באותו זמן פירסמה המשוררת חוה פנחס-כהן את ספר שיריה השישי. כמי שחקר את שירתה, מדובר לטעמי במשוררת המוכשרת, הפורייה והמעמיקה ביותר כיום בשירה העברית. פשוט קראו את שירתה וראו את שכבות העומק הלשוניות, תרבותיות, ספרותיות, מיתולוגיות, יהודיות, נשיות המככבות תדיר בכתיבתה. והנה הירשפלד לא הזמין אותה לפסטיבל, כפי שלא הזמינו אותה לפסטיבלים הקודמים.

“[…] כך החבורה הזאת עובדת: יש לה מונופול על המוסר, האינטלקט, האסתטיקה. בקיצור, בדיחה. לא רק חוה פנחס-כהן, אלא מכלול יוצרים גדול, מלא ומקיף זכה להדרה מכתיבתו ומפעליו של הירשפלד ואחרים המשתמשים בקריטריונים אמנותיים כמסווה לקריטריונים פוליטיים, והדוגמאות מרובות […] עכשיו הירשפלד תוהה כיצד מערבים פוליטיקה בתרבות. אז מה עשית כל השנים, ספרות?”.

כותב דן מרגלית ב”ישראל היום”: “בקבלו מהשר שי פירון את האחריות למשרד החינוך מצא בנימין נתניהו שקודמו קבע כי הפרופסורים אריאל הירשפלד ואבנר הולצמן (וכן הסופרת גיל הראבן) ישמשו השנה כחברי הוועדה לבחירת חתן פרס ישראל לספרות. לשכתו הורתה להדיח את הירשפלד והולצמן (מדוע גם אותו? שאלתי במשרד ראש הממשלה ולא קיבלתי תשובה). הירשפלד כתב בקיץ מאמר חריף נגד נתניהו ב”הארץ”, אבל ההסבר להדחתו היה שקרא לסרב לשרת בצה”ל. איני חוקר כליות ולב, אבל גם אם נכון שהמניע הוא תמיכתו בסרבנות, היה זה משגה דרמטי מאת נתניהו לפטרו. מפני שהדחתו בדיעבד עלולה ליצור מראית עין של ז’דנוביזם (רדיפה).

“[…] רק שמנגד קיימת תהייה: כיצד קורה שכל התקציבים לעידוד התרבות זורמים בישראל למי שבכתיבתם נוטים לצד הפלשתיני בעודם עוסקים בסכסוך הישראלי-ערבי? ניתנים גם למי שבכל מחלוקת חילונית-דתית כותבים נגד חובשי הכיפות. לא סביר שכבר עשרות שנים לא נראה על הבמה או על צג הטלוויזיה מחזה כלשהו המתאר דווקא את האור הגדול של הציונות. גם זה דורש תיקון”.

שתי מודעות

“הארץ”, עמוד ראשון, מודעת רבע עמוד של מרצ: כותרת: “פרס חורבן ישראל”. מתוך הטקסט: “ביבי הופך את פרס ישראל לפרס ארץ ישראל השלמה”; “היום זו משטרת דעות, מחר זו תהיה משטרת מחשבות”.

“הארץ”, עמ’ 6, ריבוע בן 3 טורים: “קראנו בתדהמה על החלטת לשכת ראש הממשלה לפסול ללא נימוק את מועמדותם של שני חברים בוועדת השופטים לפרס ישראל בספרות, פרופ אריאל הירשפלד ופרופ’ אבנר הולצמן. אנו קוראים לראש הממשלה לחזור בו”. על הקריאה חתומים 26 שמות. 19 פרופסורים, 3 דוקטורים, 3 סופרים ומשוררת. 8 מהחתומים זכו בפרס ישראל – 6 חתנים ו-2 כלות.

מחכים להוראות מלשכת רה”מ

הכותרת הראשית ב”הארץ”: “בצל גל הפרישות: חשש לביטול פרס ישראל השנה”. על הידיעה חתום אור קשתי, מי שפירסם לראשונה את דבר פסילתם של הירשפלד והולצמן מחברות בוועדת הפרס. קשתי דיווח כי בעקבות החשיפה התפטרו במחאה 4 מ-5 חברי ועדת השופטים בפרס ישראל לחקר הספרות (שהוקמה במקביל לוועדה לפרס הסופר): פרופ’ נסים קלדרון, פרופ’ נורית גרץ, פרופ’ זיוה בן-פורת וד”ר אורי הולנדר. זאת, נוסף לסופרת גיל הר-אבן, שהתפטרה מהוועדה לפרס הספרות, וליוצר הקולנועי רם לוי, שהתפטר מהוועדה לפרס הקולנוע (בעקבות פסילת מפיק הקולנוע והטלוויזיה חיים שריר לחברות בוועדה זו). אמש הודיע פרופ’ יגאל שוורץ כי החליט לוותר על מועמדותו לפרס.

עופר אדרת סוקר ב”הארץ” כמה מן השערוריות שעורר הפרס ב-51 שנותיו. ב-1968, במלאות שני עשורים לקום המדינה, סירב דוד בן-גוריון לקבל את הפרס על מפעל חיים, וכך כתב לשר החינוך זלמן ארן: “פועלי בארצנו לא היה יותר ממילוי חובתי האזרחית. אני רואה כחובה להודיע לכבודו שאינני רואה לי כל זכות לקבל פרס זה […] לפי הכרתי לא מגיע לי כל פרס בעד מילוי חובה, ולכן הפרס נשאר לרשותך ותוכל למסור אותו למי שתראה צורך בכך”. ב-1961 התבשר הרב צבי יהודה הכהן קוק על-ידי שר החינוך אבא אבן כי יקבל את פרס ישראל לספרות תורנית על ההוצאה לאור של כתבי אביו, הרב קוק. הוא סירב לקבל את הפרס בטענה שאינו ראוי לכך ובשל התרחקותו מכל כיבוד.

“ב-1993 הודיע פרופ’ ישעיהו ליבוביץ כי אינו מעוניין לקבל את הפרס בשל המהומה שעוררה ההחלטה להעניק לו אותו והודעתו של ראש הממשלה יצחק רבין כי יחרים את הטקס באופן חסר תקדים. על ליבוביץ נמתחה אז ביקורת ציבורית רחבה בשל ההשוואה שערך בין חמאס למסתערבים”. יצחק שמיר אמר אז כי ההחלטה להעניק לו את הפרס “מעוררת בי גועל נפש” וכי היא “תקלקל את אווירת יום-העצמאות”. שרת החינוך והתרבות דאז, שולמית אלוני, לא התרשמה מהביקורת ואמרה כי לממשלה ולכנסת אין מעמד בהחלטה על מקבלי הפרס. “אי-אפשר לבחור רק אנשים שמקובלים על הכל. מי שמקובל על כולם מותר לחשוד בו שאינו מקורי ויצירתי כל-כך”, אמרה.

ב-1976 זכה אורי זוהר בפרס ישראל לקולנוע ולטלוויזיה על סרטיו, לצד מוטי קירשנבאום, שזכה על “ניקוי ראש”. “ירידה ברמה” ו”מעשה ליצנות” היתה רוח התגובות שהציפו את העיתונים באותה תקופה במחאה על הבחירה בשניים. “אחד שהשתמש בסמים – צריך לתת לו את פרס ישראל?”, תהה אדם אחר, בהתייחסו לזוהר, שלבסוף ויתר על הפרס.

ב-1992 הוענק הפרס למשורר הערבי-ישראלי אמיל חביבי. הביקורת נגד ההחלטה באה משני עברי המתרס – פלסטינים ויהודים כאחד. העיתונאי הערבי הנודע לוטפי משעור ליגלג, ומחמוד דרוויש דרש מחביבי לא לקבל את הפרס. “ואולי נפל חביבי טרף לתכסיס תעמולה של הממסד הישראלי, המבקש להראות כי הדמוקרטיה חוגגת בישראל עד כדי כך שמעלים על נס את הישגיו של סופר ערבי”, תהה פרופ’ שמעון בלס מהחוג לספרות ערבית באוניברסיטת חיפה.

חביבי לא נרתע מהביקורת וקיבל את הפרס. “אני אוחז בתהילה בשני קצותיה. דבק בעמדותי בלי לוותר על מקומי […] איני בוגד […] אני ממשיך להילחם על זכויותי ובמשנה מרץ. עובדה היא שכיום, לאחר דרך ארוכה של מאבק למען זכויות עמי, מכירים בי גם השלטונות הישראליים. עצם הענקת הפרס מביעה את השלמתם עם היות ערביי ישראל עובדה קיימת, וכי לא יוכלו לגרשם מכאן”, אמר.

במחאה על הענקת הפרס לחביבי, החזיר יובל נאמן, ראש תנועת התחייה, את פרס ישראל בפיזיקה שניתן לו ב-1969, ויצא עם תומכיו מהאולם. הקהל, מצדו, הגיב בתשואות לחביבי, שבהמשך העניק את הפרס לסהר-האדום בעזה.

התערבות פוליטית בפרס ישראל נרשמה ב-2003, כששרת החינוך לימור לבנת שללה את הפרס ממשה גרשוני, בעקבות סירובו ללחוץ את ידה ואת ידו של ראש הממשלה אריאל שרון. שנה אחר-כך שוב נגררה לבנת למחלוקת, כשפנתה לוועדה בבקשה לדון מחדש בהמלצה להעניק את הפרס לאמן אחר, יגאל תומרקין. זאת, “בשל התנהגות והתבטאויות פוגעות של הפסל”. הוועדה, שבחנה את הנושא פעם נוספת, עמדה על החלטתה והפרס הוענק לו.

לאורך השנים הוגשו כמה עתירות לבג”ץ נגד מקבלי פרסים. כולן נדחו. ברשימה היו גם השרה שולמית אלוני והפרופ’ זאב שטרנהל. בהתייחסה לאחרון, כתבה השופטת עדנה ארבל: “בעוד פרס ישראל ניתן בגין הישגים מקצועיים ראויים להערכה, ההתבטאויות בהן מדובר על פי רוב נעשות מחוץ למסגרת המקצועית בגינה ניתן הפרס. במצב דברים זה קשה שלא לראות את מניעת הפרס ממי שנמצא ראוי לו בשל הישגיו המקצועיים, אך על בסיס עמדות שהביע, כפגיעה בחופש הביטוי”.

ב-1997, באופן חריג, התערב בג”ץ בהחלטה על מתן הפרס. השופטים ביטלו אז את החלטת שר החינוך זבולון המר לאשר את מתן פרס ישראל לעיתונות לשמואל שניצר מ”מעריב”, והורו לוועדת הפרס לקיים דיון חוזר. הוועדה נקראה להתחשב בכך ששניצר הורשע בעבירת אתיקה עיתונאית על פרסום מאמר שבו תיאר את בני הפלשמורה כ”שחורים” ומפיצי מחלות מסוכנות. בדיון בבג”ץ התברר כי ועדת השופטים שהמליצה לשר לתת את הפרס לשניצר כלל לא ידעה על פרסום המאמר, וגם לא על העובדה שבית-הדין לערעורים בענייני אתיקה של מועצת העיתונות קבע שעבר בו עבירה אתית.

בפסק הדין שביטל את החלטת המר קבע השופט תיאודור אור, בהסכמת השופטים דליה דורנר ודורית ביניש, כי העובדה שהשר והוועדה לא ידעו על המאמר, על ההרשעה ועל סירובו של שניצר לחזור בו פוגמת בהחלטת השר באופן המצדיק את ביטולה. אור הדגיש כי אין בפסק הדין משום קביעת עמדה בשאלה אם ראוי לתת את הפרס לשניצר.

כמה ימים לאחר מכן התכנסה הוועדה שנית והחליטה שלא להעניק את הפרס לשניצר, בשל אי-יכולתם של חבריה להגיע להסכמה פה אחד בנושא. בהודעה שפירסמו אמרו, עם זאת, כי אין במאמר של שניצר בכדי לערער את תרומתו לעיתונות העברית במשך למעלה מחמישה עשורים, אך התנצלותו עליו לא הניחה את דעתם.

ביקורת על התנהלות הוועדה מתח מבקר המדינה מיכה לינדנשטראוס ב-2010. “יוקרתו של פרס ישראל מחייבת שתהליך בחירת הזוכים יהיה הוגן, שוויוני, נטול כל ליקויים בהליך בחירת חתני הפרס, בשל זיקה בין יועצי השר לענייני הפרס לבין ארגונים שקיבלו אותו”.

המבקר התייחס אז לשני יועצים לשר החינוך, שבדיקתו מצאה כי המליצו על הענקת הפרס לגופים שהיו קשורים עימם מקצועית. המבקר קבע עוד כי בחירת החברים לוועדות השופטים אינה שקופה לציבור, וכי תהליך זה מוביל גם לכך ש”אין הלימה בין התפלגות האוכלוסייה לבין מקבלי הפרס במשך השנים”. כך, מבין כ-620 זוכים יחידים בפרס רק כ-90 הן נשים, ורק חמישה אינם יהודים.